View Poll Results: Is living aboard full time for you?
I currently live aboard and love it. 30 40.54%
I currently live aboard and hate it. 0 0%
I have never lived aboard, but want to 22 29.73%
I have never lived aboard, and never will. 6 8.11%
I have lived aboard in the past, and will again. 16 21.62%
I have lived aboard in the past, and never will again. 0 0%
Voters: 74. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-19-2018, 11:54 PM   #41
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Hi,


We spend about 3 months in the boat every year during the summer period, and I could imagine my entire life on the boat, but here it is not possible because of the harsh winter, for a few years to dream of a long cruise and spend a winter season near southern Europe where there is no sea go ice in winter.


Now it seems like ice is melting from the sea and I move from boat to water. Hope I can start boating season -18 next week.


NBs
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Old 04-20-2018, 01:46 AM   #42
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You might want to have a survey on the size of boat's liveaboards have.
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Old 04-20-2018, 01:52 AM   #43
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.

Many have maintained their land home, renting it for two reasons. One, to allow them to be sure living aboard is right for them. The other doesn't apply as much at your age and that is to have a home to come back to at retirement from boating time.
There is the third reason - income.

Our boat fell in our lap on short notice and we hadn't planned to do it all so soon but we slipped her and got her ready to live on at anchor, relaunched and moved aboard all within a month.

We literally walked away from the house and have only been back a few times in two years to grab a few bits and pieces and spray the yard in agent orange to keep the grass dead.

Really need to get back there, throw what's left in a rubbish skip ( havent used it in two years, dont need it) sell the car and motorbike and get some tenants in.

While we are managing just fine on the income we purchased over the years, the extra income in rent could come in handy for our upcoming plans.
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Old 04-20-2018, 01:56 AM   #44
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You might want to have a survey on the size of boat's liveaboards have.
Might need to define what living is.
One mans palace is another's prison.
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Old 04-20-2018, 02:02 AM   #45
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Do not believe that nearly half of "trawler" owners live on their boats. By the way, liveaboards in California are limited to 10 percent of marina berths, and there aren't that many permanent anchor-outs.
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Old 04-20-2018, 02:17 AM   #46
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By the way, visited my boat's (Coot 35) younger and bigger sister, a Coot 38, more designed for liveaboard living, at the Richmond, CA boat show today.. It's three feet longer. Forward cabin is given 18 inches more length so there is a central bed with access on both sides. Eighteen more inches in the rear cockpit. Also has larger oven and refrigerator, with addition of washer/dryer. Bigger interior also since the upper structure is fiberglass rather than steel. It's railings are on steroids.
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Old 04-20-2018, 06:37 AM   #47
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I could be happy as a liveaboard. Having spent my adult life aquiring a home, and possessions, I can see real tranquility in not having to deal with and yes pay to insure and maintain a lifetimes worth of stuff. I do not think I am alone in sometimes thinking I am tied down by our possessions.

My wife could not live aboard. She on the other hand likes the big house, and all the stuff. She really likes the flowers she grows in the summer, and room to roam in the winter.

So...we compromise. We have a boat that I spend a few months on a year, and she spends a bit less, probably a month or so. With both of our needs in mind we own a boat that allows us to maintain our home life and our boat life.

I still work part time, and in a couple of short years that will end. After that we will both probably spend more time on the boat, but how much more neither of us knows.

What I do know is that we both agree that our home represents a sizable apreciating asset. Neither of us are willing to risk that asset, to buy a larger more comfortable boat.

We both recognize that at some point almost all boaters retire from boating. We feel that we need the financial security that a land based home provides. When we retire from boating the boat will be worth a fraction of what we paid for it, while our home is now worth several times what we paid for it decades ago. That home value provides us options in our elderly years that just owning a boat would not provide.

All that said, and all those thoughts expressed, I think the idea of freedom from being burdened by possessions (like a house) has a very strong appeal. I will admit that if it were just me, I would choose a cruising lifestyle and make the best of it, and live a life of adventure along the way.
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Old 04-20-2018, 10:04 AM   #48
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Living aboard is a lot like going "full time" in a Motorhome. Many where we winter do that, and we have had similar discussions with them. We have boat and Motorhome and house. 4 months in the MH, 8 months between Europe (Grandkids) boat and house. Right now the house wins. The Pool table had to go to make room in the family room for sewing stuff (Janet's main hobby) and the garage had to give way to my woodworking shop (still a little cramped).
I think the most important factor is size. You need to know how big, or small, is enough.
Our boat is just the right size for what we do, and have been doing for 24 years, but wouldn't be enough for full time living aboard. Our house is a little cramped in places, but generally close to our ideal size, our first Motorhome wasn't big enough for the 4 month thing, so we upsized and now it is.
We used to have a house in the Vancouver market, rarely visited, it wasn't appreciating as fast as the stock market in the first 4 years of retirement, so it had to go. Naturally, since being out of that marked for 4 years now, that market has skyrocketed and we will never be able to get back in. Our present house is much smaller, but is exactly where we want it to be. In today's market, selling out may not be what you will want to do.
So many factors play into a decision that is your whole lifestyle, that full and complete consideration of them all is difficult.
I too have not ticked any boxes in the poll, as none are correct for me.
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Old 04-20-2018, 12:29 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Do not believe that nearly half of "trawler" owners live on their boats. By the way, liveaboards in California are limited to 10 percent of marina berths, and there aren't that many permanent anchor-outs.
Mark: That’s 26 of the 61 that have voted live on their boats and that’s with 1,400 plus views of this thread.

As far as size goes that’s a good question. We’re 43’ and have lived and cruised on Hobo for 10 plus years full time. Our last boat was 42.5’ and we lived and cruised on that for 10 years
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Old 04-20-2018, 01:56 PM   #50
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Part of the reason we sold the house. If there's no house, they can't come back. EZPZ

I tried that, sold the house and bought a smaller waterfront home with a dock for the boat. The only thing I missed was changing my phone number. They found me again.
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Old 04-20-2018, 03:13 PM   #51
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I'm not sure that size is the most important factor, to be honest. I think It's more a question of layout, but that's entirely subjective. For example: I like raised pilothouses, galleys down, and single engines. That obviously wouldn't work for everyone, no matter what the size. I've been aboard 40 footers that I couldn't possibly live aboard, (mainship 390 springs immediately to mind) while a nice late model Monk 36 would definitely work for me.

Larry, I think the KK42 is just about the perfect layout for me. If I could afford a decent example of one, it would be really high on my list.

I guess the main objective I had in posting the poll was to find out how many people had been bitten by the same bug at some point in their lives, and to find out what they did about it, and how they feel about the choices that they made. I know it's a small sample size, and I'm not likely to find anyone here that tried it out and hated it so much that they never set foot on a boat again, but it's a start. Also I've been here long enough to know that I'll get some good information from you all.
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Old 04-20-2018, 03:16 PM   #52
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OK, OK, I said "Liveaboard and love it" here's the dirty truth:

We've been aboard 3 years and have recently started talking about a house. I want a garage, she wants a garden. Neither of us wants to fear for our house in the next hurricane. I'm sick of always doing boat maintenance, she's sick of everything breaking and stinking like bilge/diesel/poop/coolant/boat/whatever. We go out more than any other boat in our (very tiny) marina. But even that's only 1-2 times a month for a weekend or less at a time.

HOWEVER

We're both terrified of having to buy all that junk you dirt people have (Furniture, beds, TVs, Washer, Dryer, etc, etc, etc), we cannot afford a dirt house with the scenery we wake up and fall asleep to, and HOLY MOLY is a good day on the water TOTALLY WORTH IT!


Sorry to continue to muddy the waters of decision making
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Old 04-20-2018, 03:41 PM   #53
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Do not believe that nearly half of "trawler" owners live on their boats. By the way, liveaboards in California are limited to 10 percent of marina berths, and there aren't that many permanent anchor-outs.
If all goes according to plan, I'd be a liveaboard as far as I was concerned, but would hopefully be on the move enough to be a transient in the eyes of any marinas I'd be stopping at. I love the idea of changing the view frequently. Also, thanks for the heads up on the Coot 38. I didn't realized they'd come out with a bigger one. They're nice, but since they're all still fairly new, they're still a bit to steep for me.

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There is the third reason - income.

While we are managing just fine on the income we purchased over the years, the extra income in rent could come in handy for our upcoming plans.
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What I do know is that we both agree that our home represents a sizable apreciating asset. Neither of us are willing to risk that asset, to buy a larger more comfortable boat.

We both recognize that at some point almost all boaters retire from boating. We feel that we need the financial security that a land based home provides. When we retire from boating the boat will be worth a fraction of what we paid for it, while our home is now worth several times what we paid for it decades ago. That home value provides us options in our elderly years that just owning a boat would not provide.
My thought process has been that the equity I have in my home would significantly reduce the amount of boat I would end up financing. I've had something of an aversion to renting my place out, but the more I think about it, the less I dislike the possibility. If only to make sure I have a plan B for a while.

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I could be happy as a liveaboard. Having spent my adult life aquiring a home, and possessions, I can see real tranquility in not having to deal with and yes pay to insure and maintain a lifetimes worth of stuff. I do not think I am alone in sometimes thinking I am tied down by our possessions.
You are most certainly NOT alone in that.

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All that said, and all those thoughts expressed, I think the idea of freedom from being burdened by possessions (like a house) has a very strong appeal. I will admit that if it were just me, I would choose a cruising lifestyle and make the best of it, and live a life of adventure along the way.
It's very romantic, isn't it? It's really impossible for me not to get excited about the idea. I often have to pull myself back down out of the clouds and remind myself about black water tanks, antifouling, mildew, and fiberglass work.

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Living aboard is a lot like going "full time" in a Motorhome.
You're absolutely right. If I was susceptible to seasickness or aquaphobia, I'd likely be posting this poll on an RV site. I love a good road trip. I spent six weeks driving 11,000 miles across 26 states last winter, and loved every single second of it. Except Nebraska.

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So many factors play into a decision that is your whole lifestyle, that full and complete consideration of them all is difficult.
Ain't that the truth... lol.
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Old 04-20-2018, 03:43 PM   #54
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OK, OK, I said "Liveaboard and love it" here's the dirty truth:

We've been aboard 3 years and have recently started talking about a house. I want a garage, she wants a garden. :
A bigger boat can work.
Was on a 55ft houseboat yesterday that had chilli tree, pawpaw tree and an extensive herb garden.
It also had a large tool room including MIG welder and all the power tools needed for building in aluminium.

Quote:
Neither of us wants to fear for our house in the next hurricane.
turn the key, push the throttle forward and move out of hurricane zone for those few months.
Its what many do here for cyclone season.

Quote:
I'm sick of always doing boat maintenance,
.
Always?
And since when have houses been maintenance free?
Quote:
she's sick of everything breaking and stinking like bilge/diesel/poop/coolant/boat/whatever
Sorry if this offends but i have been on boats that stink and they are usually poorly maintained.
If you have a diesel or effluent leak fix it properly and clean up afterwards.

I live on one that doesn't stink and all the live aboard boats I have visited don't stink either.
Maintenance, love and getting on top of things before they break is the answer.
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Old 04-20-2018, 03:46 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by Gabe n Em View Post
OK, OK, I said "Liveaboard and love it" here's the dirty truth:

We've been aboard 3 years and have recently started talking about a house. I want a garage, she wants a garden. Neither of us wants to fear for our house in the next hurricane. I'm sick of always doing boat maintenance, she's sick of everything breaking and stinking like bilge/diesel/poop/coolant/boat/whatever. We go out more than any other boat in our (very tiny) marina. But even that's only 1-2 times a month for a weekend or less at a time.

HOWEVER

We're both terrified of having to buy all that junk you dirt people have (Furniture, beds, TVs, Washer, Dryer, etc, etc, etc), we cannot afford a dirt house with the scenery we wake up and fall asleep to, and HOLY MOLY is a good day on the water TOTALLY WORTH IT!


Sorry to continue to muddy the waters of decision making
No, definitely don't be sorry! This is the kind of feedback that this thread so sorely lacks. I want to hear more truth, be it dirty or otherwise. Thanks for posting that.
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Old 04-20-2018, 04:23 PM   #56
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We live on board four months a year, through the summer. When we get back home in the fall, moving ashore feels good. I guess we're switch hitters? As Tiltrider said, PNW winters living onboard test your resolve, as in cold, dark and wet. It's not for us.
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Old 04-20-2018, 05:16 PM   #57
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A bigger boat can work.
Was on a 55ft houseboat yesterday that had chilli tree, pawpaw tree and an extensive herb garden.
It also had a large tool room including MIG welder and all the power tools needed for building in aluminium.

turn the key, push the throttle forward and move out of hurricane zone for those few months.
Its what many do here for cyclone season.

.
Always?
And since when have houses been maintenance free?

Sorry if this offends but i have been on boats that stink and they are usually poorly maintained.
If you have a diesel or effluent leak fix it properly and clean up afterwards.

I live on one that doesn't stink and all the live aboard boats I have visited don't stink either.
Maintenance, love and getting on top of things before they break is the answer.
Haha, Simi, you've kind of hit the nail on the head. We're also looking at other boats.

I'm exaggerating a little just to make a better story. I agree - if it stinks, fix it.

Its not ALWAYS but sometimes feels like it.

We can't get out of hurricane zone unfortunately, our jobs are here. I'm currently scouting and making my own charts of the local rivers to see which one I can get the farthest up in case of a hurricane.
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Old 04-20-2018, 06:49 PM   #58
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Here is another aspect to consider...

If you take away the asset portion of the equation, and don’t use home ownership as a comparison...

Living on a boat large enough to be comfortable provides a lifestyle that would be unaffordable otherwise.

Try renting (or buying) a waterfront condo (or home) sometime. The price can be litterally unobtainable.

Compare that to the cost of buying a boat and putting it in a nice waterfront location... say Downtown Seattle, or Downtown San Diego for example.

You can get a liveaboard 50’ slip in Downtown San Diego for something around what $1400 a month (including liveaboard fees) plus the price of a boat.

How much would a condo cost you a month that had direct 0 steps to the water access for your Kayak?

This is still something I am considering as a retirement snowbird destination. Park the boat in San Diego or somewhere else warm. and go spend 3-4 months on it a year. Spend a month or so moving it north in the spring, and south in the fall, and enjoy the Alaskan summers.
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Old 04-20-2018, 09:12 PM   #59
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I’m just going to vent for a minute here. Joy and I have been talking this sell out and live aboard thing for a while now , but much more lately. We have an old house that needs constant upkeep and we have always done everything ourselves , whether it’s building a house , rebuilding a house , reworking a boat or whatever. We have this mindset that we can do it all ourselves better and for less money. Just this week while I’m at work Joy has working on a scaffolding scrapping and painting some of our 100 year old wood windows at the house. We’re not old but we ain’t no spring chickens either. I don’t think this madness will ever end. I know our kids would just hire somebody to get this done but no not us we got to do it ourselves.And then there is the boat to try and keep in shape , that’s a whole nother thang. I think we are getting close to having one or the other or at least one that somebody else keeps up. Sorry for the rant but that’s how it is .
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Old 04-20-2018, 09:45 PM   #60
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Iím just going to vent for a minute here. Joy and I have been talking this sell out and live aboard thing for a while now , but much more lately. We have an old house that needs constant upkeep and we have always done everything ourselves , whether itís building a house , rebuilding a house , reworking a boat or whatever. We have this mindset that we can do it all ourselves better and for less money. Just this week while Iím at work Joy has working on a scaffolding scrapping and painting some of our 100 year old wood windows at the house. Weíre not old but we ainít no spring chickens either. I donít think this madness will ever end. I know our kids would just hire somebody to get this done but no not us we got to do it ourselves.And then there is the boat to try and keep in shape , thatís a whole nother thang. I think we are getting close to having one or the other or at least one that somebody else keeps up. Sorry for the rant but thatís how it is .
Sounds like you've identified a problem. Now can or will you and Joy correct it? As one ages, it seems to me life should get simpler and sometimes that takes effort. If you enjoy all the labor, then that's fine, but if it's filling your life with work and unpleasant effort when you could be enjoying things instead, then it's a problem. If one would make life easier or having someone else keep up one would, then you should move in that direction. While I'm not tempted to do the kind of work you do, I would be doing a lot of things that my wife is the wise one who limits me.

One can always do things at less cost than having someone else do them. We could make our own clothes, grow our own food, do all our own repairs. We have to determine what things to do ourselves and that will likely change many times over the years.
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