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Old 12-30-2018, 09:28 AM   #21
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Perhaps you could store it in the water and get some use out of it occaisionally between now and retirement. It would give you a chance to get to know her gradually. Kind of like dating before you get married.
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Or even better, don't just store it in the water... begin using it, too. From time to time, while focusing more on all that other stuff.

-Chris
Hey, I'm right there with you, guys. Made that argument, myself. I'd love to be running her from time to time. $550 per month to store on the hill with free electric when onsite to work on her. Plus hotel fees if we stay overnight on the weekend to work two days in a row. (too warm in Florida for most of the year to sleep onboard without a/c) $640 per month for a wet slip plus electric. One hotel stay, once a month, would make the two options about equal. However, the wet option would include additional insurance and monthly bottom cleaning fees. Right now we're trying to minimize expenses until the actual retirement date so it looks dry is the best option.
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Old 12-30-2018, 10:04 AM   #22
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If the boat is outside, put the solar panels on first and they will keep the batteries fully charged. My boat sits for 7 months every year and I have no issues with the engine.


To keep the boat dry, shrink wrap is the best. You do need to install several active (solar) vents. Solar panels will pick up enough light through shrink wrap to trickle charge your batteries.
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Old 12-30-2018, 04:40 PM   #23
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$550 a month is up there. I do not recommend running the engine(s) at all. Perform normal winterizing/long term storage per the manual and do not run them after that. Keep the batteries charged, completely dry the bilge, put out a bunch of "Damp-Rid" and keep the boat closed up tightly to keep out the moisture. Boats around the Northeast are put up this way for 7 months EVERY year with no issue.

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Old 12-31-2018, 08:00 AM   #24
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Hey, I'm right there with you, guys. Made that argument, myself. I'd love to be running her from time to time. $550 per month to store on the hill with free electric when onsite to work on her. Plus hotel fees if we stay overnight on the weekend to work two days in a row. (too warm in Florida for most of the year to sleep onboard without a/c) $640 per month for a wet slip plus electric. One hotel stay, once a month, would make the two options about equal. However, the wet option would include additional insurance and monthly bottom cleaning fees. Right now we're trying to minimize expenses until the actual retirement date so it looks dry is the best option.

Fair enough...

But remember "intellectual income" can be priceless.

Would you enjoy staying in that hotel? Would you enjoy staying on the boat?

Only you can decide, of course.

-Chris
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Old 12-31-2018, 08:12 AM   #25
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Fair enough...

But remember "intellectual income" can be priceless.

Would you enjoy staying in that hotel? Would you enjoy staying on the boat?

Only you can decide, of course.

-Chris
Oh, I'm a big believer in intellectual income. And there is no doubt I'd rather stay on the boat than in a hotel... any hotel. Two year, two months, eleven days until retirement and I'm chomping at the bit every single day. Just a couple more things that need to be put into place first.

John
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Old 12-31-2018, 08:18 AM   #26
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Hey, I'm right there with you, guys. Made that argument, myself. I'd love to be running her from time to time. $550 per month to store on the hill with free electric when onsite to work on her. Plus hotel fees if we stay overnight on the weekend to work two days in a row. (too warm in Florida for most of the year to sleep onboard without a/c) $640 per month for a wet slip plus electric. One hotel stay, once a month, would make the two options about equal. However, the wet option would include additional insurance and monthly bottom cleaning fees. Right now we're trying to minimize expenses until the actual retirement date so it looks dry is the best option.
John,

In that case, keeping it in the water is a no brainer! If you're saving thousands on the hard and dockage is horribly expensive, different story. At $90 more a month, that's bupkis.... put it in the water!

Need a bit more info. Tell us about the boat, size, age, equipment, etc? Where are you located... is that Lakeland, FL? Where is the boat located

You say no AC, I'd assume you'd add that?

Gut feeling.....

Keep it on the hard until you get the stuff done that is harder or impossible to do on the water, including your AC. Make the boat livable (assume it's the kind of boat you will be staying on?). Then get it on the water. What additional insurance on the water?

Once you have it livable, you don't have motel bills, and staying on the boat is fun, and you'll learn what things you'll want when you launch it for traveling.
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Old 12-31-2018, 08:31 AM   #27
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Even in dry storage you need insurance so add that to your cost. There is also depreciation on newer boats to consider. IMO either keep it in the water and uses it occasionally or wait to buy until you are ready.
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Old 12-31-2018, 08:35 AM   #28
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Even in dry storage you need insurance so add that to your cost. There is also depreciation on newer boats to consider. IMO either keep it in the water and uses it occasionally or wait to buy until you are ready.
Yeah, that's also a discussion my wife and I have had. Numerous times.
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Old 12-31-2018, 08:47 AM   #29
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John,

In that case, keeping it in the water is a no brainer! If you're saving thousands on the hard and dockage is horribly expensive, different story. At $90 more a month, that's bupkis.... put it in the water!
I know, right? That was the subject of much discussion. Factors that must be added in to the equation are shore power at the dock and the additional insurance. On the hill, we could get away with Comp only. In the water, collision and liability would be a requirement. All factors. There are several others, including the last young 'un is about to start college in the fall.

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Need a bit more info. Tell us about the boat, size, age, equipment, etc? Where are you located... is that Lakeland, FL? Where is the boat located
Yes, we're located in Lakeland, FL. For another two years, two months, and eleven days. Then I hit retirement and we plan to sell the house and become full time cruisers.

It's a 1987 54' Ocean Alexander. Some of the electronics are not the current version but they're still very functional and do all of the things we would want. It need a paint job from the rails up, need wall paper stripped off, carpet replaced, a new stove, a couple of minor leaks sealed, etc.

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You say no AC, I'd assume you'd add that?
There is A/C. But if the boat is kept in the yard, instead of the water, it's pretty hard to run the A/C. There are already four A/C units installed. Two are a bit leaky and need to be repaired or replaced but two are fairly new.

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Gut feeling.....

Keep it on the hard until you get the stuff done that is harder or impossible to do on the water, including your AC. Make the boat livable (assume it's the kind of boat you will be staying on?). Then get it on the water. What additional insurance on the water?

Once you have it livable, you don't have motel bills, and staying on the boat is fun, and you'll learn what things you'll want when you launch it for traveling.
Yup! That's our plan. At least for now.
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Old 12-31-2018, 11:20 AM   #30
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Lakeland in not all that far from Tampa Bay . Little harbor on the west side of the bay would be easy to access from I 75 and is protected. there are also several marinas in Bradenton. They may not be the best marinas for frequent boating but would work for weekend work visits and boat trips.
probably only 1.5 hour drive.


IMO it is too early for you to buy a boat. There are always lots of boats for sale. Save the money and buy the same boat in two years more cheaply. Your savings go up while the boat price goes down. A double win.
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Old 12-31-2018, 11:24 AM   #31
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Lakeland in not all that far from Tampa Bay . Little harbor on the wet side of the bay would be easy to access and is protected. there are also several marinas in Bradenton. They may not be the best marinas for frequent boating but would work for weekend work visits and boat trips.
probably only 1.5 hour drive.


IMO it is too early for you to buy a boat. There are always lots of boats for sale. Save the money and buy the same boat in two years more cheaply. Your savings go up while the boat price goes down. A double win.
We spend a size-able amount of our time over in the Tampa/St Pete/Clearwater/Bradenton area. we kept our previous boat at Riviera Dunes in Palmetto. One hour, door to door.

Yeah, we've been going back and forth on that second issue. We're trying to be cognizant of life sometimes throwing good opportunities at you at previously-considered-inconvenient times. Best laid plans... you know. Life's a balancing act.
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Old 12-31-2018, 11:48 AM   #32
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If your sure your not going to use it I believe I'd wait until a little bit closer to retirement. Give it a year. Still plenty of time to buy, and recondition, your boat. Look at every boat you can that's even close to what you want.
I'm one who thinks sitting is harder on a boat than using it.
Still working on land does have it's advantages and necessary for some work. I'm thinking money isn't an issue but the $$ savings from waiting would buy you new electronics if needed or go a ways towards reconditioning..
Still no reason you couldn't buy and refurbish for a year then splash and use. Only way to really know what you want is to use it.
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Old 01-04-2019, 02:16 PM   #33
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This requires some elements of a winterization and some of attended living aboard. Among other things, I would not recommend periodic starting of engines unless they could be loaded (and thus oil warmed up), something you can't do when hauled. Properly stored they will not suffer, I've put vessels to sleep, properly, for 5+ years with no ill effects to engines and gens.

This was an issue that I encountered often during the recession, which prompted me to cover the subject in this article https://stevedmarineconsulting.com/w...rage122_04.pdf

If the boat was afloat and you could use it from time to time, that would be best. Disuse is the worst thing for machinery and systems.
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Old 01-04-2019, 02:31 PM   #34
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The attached might be helpful. My office is nearby Green Cove Springs Marina where many snow birds hole up for hurricane season. I attended a few partial submersion events that occurred on the hard there that were entirely preventable so wrote this article. As far as I know they keep them on hand to give out to their tenants.
Bill

A very good guide for extended storage, well done.

Re. #7, closing all seacocks could prevent deck, cockpit and other drains from draining. I would not close a seacock unless I was certain of everything it served (deck drains are sometimes T'd into other drains. I've had this a couple of times in my career when a tech closed a cockpit drain seacock during winterization, the cockpit filled and overflowed into the cabin.

Also, unless the vessel has a garboard plug, I would not disable the bilge pump system by plugging the discharge and/or turning off batteries. Sailing vessels in particular are notorious for leaking water through masts and partners. While the self-discharge rate of an AGM battery is low, if it's relied upon for bilge pumps it should remain on float charge (true for any battery that is powering a bilge pump). You do allude to this in section 14C, but owner experience really should not matter.
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Old 01-04-2019, 03:29 PM   #35
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"Also, unless the vessel has a garboard plug, I would not disable the bilge pump system by plugging the discharge and/or turning off batteries."

All good advice and a good place to point out at least 1 bilge pump should be wired to the hot side of the batteries or shut off switch with an inline fuse. In other words always on and ready, no matter what.
If I need a bilge pump, I want it to run until the batteries die hoping somebody would see it running a lot and investigate.
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Old 01-04-2019, 09:50 PM   #36
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Biocide

For that long it would not hurt to put a little biocide in your tanks. Bacteria live on the water-fuel interface and have a lot of undisturbed time in 18 months.
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Old 01-07-2019, 09:51 AM   #37
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Keeping a boat on the hard for a year and a half

John,

I lived aboard in Palmetto for about 18 months before heading north.

When I bought her she hadn't been "run" regularly for 1-2 years. She was basically a floating office & "playpen". Her fuel was pea green and there was only 1/8 tank left. Biocide, full tanks, new filters, rebuilding the injectors, and cleaning the fuel injector pumps made her a happy camper. It taught me a ton about my engines.

I've been on & off the hard for the last due to mechanical issues & it looks like I may be there for another one.

I was aboard after 2 months without power. Green mold everywhere! Get a dehumidifier running asap. Sinus infections and bronchitis aren't your friends.

John.
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Old 01-07-2019, 01:47 PM   #38
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...put out a bunch of "Damp-Rid"
Have a plan to check and empty them periodically. Refresh/replace as necessary and make sure not to place them on surfaces that'd be harmed by any errant moisture.

It's good idea to get onboard and remove all of them before it gets moved so they any filled ones don't spill.

I keep a simple written list onboard of stuff that should be dealt with before re-commissioning. Simple stuff like a list of the seacocks or drains that might need a different position than how they're stored (water heater bypass, for one), plugs to be removed/replaced, filters to be changed, quantity of damp rid containers/bags onboard, etc. I scribble notes on what else worked/failed and keep it as a guide for next year.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:27 AM   #39
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We took 2 years to both visit many boat types and qualify our requirements then created shortlist. Then looked again and bought 3 months before retirement. Then took 12 months for deep dive restoration. Now happily with lovely craft wintering marathon ready for spring travel up the coast. But when you need itno sooner. Dial in refit go from there.
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Old 01-09-2019, 11:49 AM   #40
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Leaving her on the hard for a few years should be no problem if you've done a good job winterizing her. A good Shrinkwrap job with support and ventilation is a must. All cabinets and doors as well as some ports should be left open. Have a good door on the wrap and check on her every couple of months. Winter has snow, ice, rain and humidity. Summer has heat, bugs and humidity too. Pull the bilge plug, drain and wax everything. One of those solar powered vents would be good too but I've never.



There will still be some surprises when you wake her up. Shouldn't be anything major.



Angelina has been on the hard during fuel tank changes, college, grad school, again during the "bad" year. Each time she came back smiling.
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