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Old 07-03-2022, 11:55 PM   #11821
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For those not so worried about fuel prices;
40gph at 25kn with twin 680hp Volvos on Hamilton Jets.

https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/motors/b...4?bof=p58a4XKd

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Old 07-04-2022, 12:15 AM   #11822
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For those not so worried about fuel prices
There will be less and less of these as time passes, I am thinking. These figures make my 45 litres/hour at 10kn for both engines look positively thrifty, yet at $2.40/litre, that's still significant.

On the other hand, totally understand Nick and the Admiral's perspective, too.
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Old 07-04-2022, 12:26 AM   #11823
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Originally Posted by darkside View Post
For those not so worried about fuel prices;
40gph at 25kn with twin 680hp Volvos on Hamilton Jets.

https://www.trademe.co.nz/a/motors/b...4?bof=p58a4XKd

Attachment 130121
200nm :- 25 kn = 8hrs X 40gph = 320gal X $7 = $2,240 :- 200nm = $11.20 per mile X 52 times per year = $116,480 annual fuel expense.

Whip out the plastic!
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Old 07-04-2022, 05:48 AM   #11824
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Would note the comments about waiting for tides doesn’t consider steerage. In general it’s easier to steer going upstream (against a current) than down. Not infrequently in places where’s there strong currents and the need for frequent course corrections to avoid fixed obstacles if you can’t go faster than the current you have no steerage and can get into a whole lot of hurt. As a younger sailor had some very underpowered boats and some with no engines at all. Then needed to time both ebb and flow both coming in and out. Others due to difficult slip and fairway issues may want to go at slack or against the tide both coming in and out. Even in sailboats or FD hulls you need sufficient power available to stay safe.
Very much like David Gerr’s discussions about needed shaft HP, props and related issues to achieve a safe useable boat.
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Old 07-04-2022, 07:55 AM   #11825
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Would note the comments about waiting for tides doesn’t consider steerage. In general it’s easier to steer going upstream (against a current) than down. Not infrequently in places where’s there strong currents and the need for frequent course corrections to avoid fixed obstacles if you can’t go faster than the current you have no steerage and can get into a whole lot of hurt. As a younger sailor had some very underpowered boats and some with no engines at all. Then needed to time both ebb and flow both coming in and out. Others due to difficult slip and fairway issues may want to go at slack or against the tide both coming in and out. Even in sailboats or FD hulls you need sufficient power available to stay safe.
Very much like David Gerr’s discussions about needed shaft HP, props and related issues to achieve a safe useable boat.
If you're doing 7 kts through the water, you're doing that regardless of current direction and you'll have the same steerage. Against a 3 kt current you'll just see a lower SOG of 4 kts, going with the current you'd be going 10.

The steerage problem only really happens if you slow down while moving with the current.
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Old 07-04-2022, 08:54 AM   #11826
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If you're doing 7 kts through the water, you're doing that regardless of current direction and you'll have the same steerage. Against a 3 kt current you'll just see a lower SOG of 4 kts, going with the current you'd be going 10.

The steerage problem only really happens if you slow down while moving with the current.
So true!

As I'd mentioned on previous posts... I'd set our engines' rpms [perfectly synchronized by flashing light meter - and sound] so GPS read 7 knts in completely slack tide at trip beginning. Had purposefully started [timed] the cruise to ride with the current. Once the current really got underway... GPs read all the way up to 10.5 knots SOG. Meaning we were traveling with a 3.5 knot current [no appreciable wind]. And, of course boat handling was eze pezy! At end of cruise, as we exited SF Delta waters and entered SF Harbor the tide direction changed. Luckily we had but a few miles going against the tide and its current; which reached not more than 1 knot. Therefore, our GPS then read 6 knots SOG.

Now - if you run into "boiling" waters due to many factors boat handling can be affected at slower speeds whether going with or against the current.

And, in a row boat - you better plan well!!
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Old 07-04-2022, 09:40 AM   #11827
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This is an interesting boat and inexpensive. One error in the listing is that the boat is built of wood, which is described in the detailed text of the listing, but the summary lists it as fiberglass.



https://www.yachtworld.com/yacht/197...awler-8377886/
Someone needs to bring Strumpet back to the West (wet) coast where it would be appreciated.
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Old 07-04-2022, 09:40 AM   #11828
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Originally Posted by Kit_L View Post
There will be less and less of these as time passes, I am thinking. These figures make my 45 litres/hour at 10kn for both engines look positively thrifty, yet at $2.40/litre, that's still significant.

On the other hand, totally understand Nick and the Admiral's perspective, too.
There's no way around physics. With fuel at over $6/gal, running a power boat is $EXPENSIVE$. It's just a question of where in the excruciatingly expensive$$$ to unbearably expensive$$$$$ range you fall.

The only way around it seems to be either sail, or human power. I'm too old to go back to sailing, and cruising under human power means canoe camping, which I'm also too old for.

In another thread (I think semi-displacement?) there were some mentions of the old style (1920s/1930s) narrow powerboats that would make reasonable speed on modest power (at the trade off of less interior cabin space). A boat like that might bring the cost down to merely breathtakingly$$ expensive. I wonder if there might be at least of a bit of an increase in those styles of boats coming (like the Andreyale)?
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Old 07-04-2022, 01:37 PM   #11829
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Someone needs to bring Strumpet back to the West (wet) coast where it would be appreciated.
But the cost of restoring and maintaining that wood boat…if the expertise still exists.
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Old 07-04-2022, 01:54 PM   #11830
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But the cost of restoring and maintaining that wood boat…if the expertise still exists.
Of course the expertise exists. There are yards that still build wood boats and the skills are still being taught… even on the east coast if one can believe it.
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Old 07-04-2022, 02:07 PM   #11831
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[QUOTE=There will be less and less of these as time passes, I am thinking.[/QUOTE]

Perhaps. This one sold four days after listing, sight unseen. At least two other buyers were ready to pounce. At present they are still very much sought after down here.
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Old 07-04-2022, 02:18 PM   #11832
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Of course the expertise exists. There are yards that still build wood boats and the skills are still being taught… even on the east coast if one can believe it.
There are a number of renowned boatyards in Maine (as well as Rhode Island and Massachusetts) that only work on and build wood boats.

They turn out true works of art and beauty. The craftsmanship is breathtaking. So are the costs.

I think at this point, owning a wood boat is for either skilled boatrights, or the very wealthy for whom cost is no object.
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Old 07-04-2022, 02:36 PM   #11833
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Originally Posted by Kit_L View Post
There will be less and less of these as time passes, I am thinking. These figures make my 45 litres/hour at 10kn for both engines look positively thrifty, yet at $2.40/litre, that's still significant.

On the other hand, totally understand Nick and the Admiral's perspective, too.
Feeling pretty chuffed about our 15 litres/hour pushing a 60 ft 65 tonne house through the water @ 7.5kn

We have always used currents where we can, a leftover from our sailing days.
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Old 07-04-2022, 02:45 PM   #11834
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Originally Posted by Nick14 View Post
There's no way around physics. With fuel at over $6/gal, running a power boat is $EXPENSIVE$. It's just a question of where in the excruciatingly expensive$$$ to unbearably expensive$$$$$ range you fall.

The only way around it seems to be either sail, or human power. I'm too old to go back to sailing, and cruising under human power means canoe camping, which I'm also too old for.
Or actually go cruising to other lands.
Diesel pics in Malaysia currently $1.85/gallon US
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Old 07-04-2022, 08:53 PM   #11835
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Ex Pineapple Cup Racer Converted to Trawler

1999 Ex Racer, de rigged, re-fitted to the dark side.
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Old 07-04-2022, 09:01 PM   #11836
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Western Flyer launched!
https://youtu.be/VwFWctNHckE
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Old 07-05-2022, 01:36 AM   #11837
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Wow! what a difference in just a few years since she was sitting on the bottom of the Swinomish!

Like the fellow said it must be a true privilege to be part of that crew.
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Old 07-05-2022, 03:32 AM   #11838
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So around here there’s places where steering gets real mushy because speed through the water is quite different than speed over ground going with the current and quite sensitive when against. Are you telling us it makes no difference in how much rudder or distance is needed to make the same turn upstream or down?
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Old 07-05-2022, 03:43 AM   #11839
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A great projected use as well. Wonder the specifics of the propulsion system. Totally electric when in sensitive areas.
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Old 07-05-2022, 04:05 AM   #11840
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So around here there’s places where steering gets real mushy because speed through the water is quite different than speed over ground going with the current and quite sensitive when against. Are you telling us it makes no difference in how much rudder or distance is needed to make the same turn upstream or down?
Of course it does
But you learns your boat and works her accordingly
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