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Old 09-14-2017, 04:50 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McGillicuddy View Post
Cleats should never be used as lifting points. They are not designed to support the vertical weight of a vessel. Using cleats to lift during a salvage operation would be a huge red flag to me that the salvor does not understand what he is doing.
Well, I guesx it depends on experience and knowledge.

While cleats are not necessaruly used in a salvage, that wasnt my real point.

It was how often boats are found hanging from them and not necessarily top of the line boats.

And like always, dont read into any method too far ....my salvage supervisor record stands on its own, your red flags or not....even my boss would agree in part with you, but he trusts me to solo salvage boats he usualky uses a crew for.
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Old 09-15-2017, 12:22 PM   #22
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We spent the hurricane in a friends newer home with hurricane glass right on Pine Island Sound so we had a great if not a little scary view. The water was pulled out for about 6 hrs and when the wind direction changed it came back in very quicky..20 to 30 minutes!
The picture shows the bottom that would normally have 6' of water over it. The picture was taken during a lull.
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Old 09-22-2017, 12:24 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Nimble1 View Post
We spent the hurricane in a friends newer home with hurricane glass right on Pine Island Sound so we had a great if not a little scary view. The water was pulled out for about 6 hrs and when the wind direction changed it came back in very quicky..20 to 30 minutes!

The picture shows the bottom that would normally have 6' of water over it. The picture was taken during a lull.


I am on slides all the way up in Gulf Breeze. We lost about one foot of water more than normal for our low tide. I had about two feet of travel left on my slide moors. Not sure what would happen if we lost eight. I guess I need to drop pilings down flat under the slip to ensure I cannot sink into the muck and come off the bottom of the slides!
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Old 09-22-2017, 07:04 AM   #24
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My Mainship is no Nordic but I still love it.

My cleat didn't fare so well.

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Old 09-22-2017, 08:33 AM   #25
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My Nordic Tug story. In 2006, the first year I had the tug, we had a typical October low pressure system come through, with winds and gusts over 60 knots, that lasted for 2 days. My tug is riding it's Dor-Mor mooring without any issues. The 40' Hunter Legend sailboat in front of me breaks off it's mooring (dual mooring lines parted, no chafe gear), and comes down on my boat. Hunter's bow anchor drills a hole behind my bow anchor guards, scrapes down the port side accent stripe, bangs and bends the frame of the back salon window, and impales the bow anchor into the transom of my boat. Boatyard crew goes out to free the Hunter from my transom, and ties the 9 ton boat on the 2 stern cleats on my transom. The Hunter spends the next couple of days bobbing in the wind off my transom cleats until the storm dies down and we move it back on its mooring. Damage to my boat was essentially cosmetic (bow and stern holes filled and painted, accent strip re-painted, salon window replaced). Cleats took the load, no problem. Speaks to the build quality of the NT's.
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Old 09-23-2017, 06:53 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrwesson View Post
My Mainship is no Nordic but I still love it.



My cleat didn't fare so well.





Your lucky it was a clean break.
Go on you tube and find out how to use
West Systems Repair. It could be enjoyable.
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Old 09-23-2017, 07:29 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Pgitug View Post
Your lucky it was a clean break.
Go on you tube and find out how to use
West Systems Repair. It could be enjoyable.
Already fixed it. Owning a Mainship means knowing how to do fiberglass work .
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Old 09-24-2017, 06:52 AM   #28
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"Cleats took the load, no problem."

It seems sad that a properly installed cleat is so rare that it can be bragged about.
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