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Old 09-25-2022, 10:26 AM   #1
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Hurricane Prep and Bimini/Enclosures...

So at what wind speed do you start taking down the enclosures (which then necessitate shrink-wrapping the helm station) and then the bimini?

I am seeing 30ish knots max so far here in JAX (yes much can happen is 3-4 days) and the enclosure has certainly seen that without drama, so was wondering what the SOP is.

Thanks in advance.
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Old 09-25-2022, 10:36 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Osprey69 View Post
So at what wind speed do you start taking down the enclosures (which then necessitate shrink-wrapping the helm station) and then the bimini?

I am seeing 30ish knots max so far here in JAX (yes much can happen is 3-4 days) and the enclosure has certainly seen that without drama, so was wondering what the SOP is.

Thanks in advance.

I'd say it depends on your enclosure. Some will have an issue at 30 - 40 kts, others will handle significantly more. Depends on how well stitched together it is, the materials, whether anything can flap, how strong the supports are, etc.



I know my canvas can take 40 kts from the side without issue. I'd be slightly more concerned with wind on the stern, and less concerned with wind on the bow.
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Old 09-25-2022, 12:34 PM   #3
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Remember, itís not only if your enclosure can take the wind, but can it take projectiles flying off of your neighbors boats?
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Old 09-25-2022, 01:41 PM   #4
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You’re in a good marina with mostly responsible boat owners. Hobo was there when Irma hit Florida in 2017. The marina being between 2 bridges plus the condos to the NW helps cut the wind and definitely reduces the fetch.

That being said, we stripped all the exterior canvas, doubled up on the dock lines/bumpers. We also lowered or tied off all our radio antennas.

The marina did loose power for day and you couldn’t easily get off the dock. The river level was so high that the dock ramps from shore went almost vertical as the floating docks rose with the river.

As far as marinas go, you are in one of the best imho to ride out a major storm.
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Old 09-25-2022, 06:14 PM   #5
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Even if your enclosure survives a tropical storm, the fabric and clear plexi can be stretched horribly. If you are going to have sustained gale plus winds then take it all down and tie down everything.
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Old 09-26-2022, 06:55 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Osprey69 View Post
So at what wind speed do you start taking down the enclosures (which then necessitate shrink-wrapping the helm station) and then the bimini?

I am seeing 30ish knots max so far here in JAX (yes much can happen is 3-4 days) and the enclosure has certainly seen that without drama, so was wondering what the SOP is.

Thanks in advance.
Can't see value in shrink wrapping after removing an enclosure. I'd expect the wrapping to go south (or wherever) too.

We once removed our enclosure (previous boat) for a hurricane that came through this area. Can't remember wind speeds; didn't matter, since the storm was really no kidding coming right through here.

In place of enclosure, I taped each instrument cover down independently and thoroughly with duct tape. (Which of course means residue afterwards... but not too bad since it didn't have to sit that way for long.) I might have been able to cobble something together for instruments with garbage bags, bubble wrap, more tape, etc. but the cover that came with each obviously fit best and were sufficient.

Different occasion, a derecho came through our home marina just a few days after we had the front portion of our original enclosure replaced with new. Wind speeds were reported anecdotally as near 80 mph... and our new enclosure was fine... whereas a few neighbor boats lost theirs, a nearby 100-ft oak tree was uprooted...

I was never able to tell whether our experience had something to do with the new construction (new Sunbrella, Goretex/Tenara thread, etc.)... the enclosure support system (hardtop instead of bimini)... or whether we just happened to not have as much of a direct hit as some of the other nearby neighbors... or...

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Old 09-26-2022, 07:32 AM   #7
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Usually, the tighter your enclosure is, the better it will fare in a blow. Flapping canvas is the enemy, it will work every fastener and stitch.
If there was a big blow coming, I think removing canvas is a good idea. Not just to save the canvas, but to reduce your boats windage.
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Old 09-26-2022, 09:54 AM   #8
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All it takes is one line of stitching to fail and you can lose the entire enclosure.

Anything above 30 knots for older but in good shpe canvas is my threshold, maybe 40-50knots but short duration for better canvas. Short duration I consider under 12 hrs.

A good canvas guy probably would have better numbers.

Insurance companies really hate canvas replacement. Costly but preventable. Boat US adjuster sad it was one of their biggest expenses a few years back.
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Old 09-26-2022, 10:00 AM   #9
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Thanks guys. its all coming down. Its good opportunity to clean it as well.

Thanks for the replies.
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