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Old 02-25-2020, 09:22 PM   #1
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How often do you change Racor Filters

With a Racor 2 Filter set-up with the left. right and both valve - How often do you change filters?

I have one on-line until changed at the next service. The one that has been standby then becomes the active filter.

Service is done yearly so each filter has had one year standby, (flooded with fuel), and one year online.

I have never had a problem with fuel - or the hint or a problem, and I don't use additives. Starboard tank supplies the engine, Port tank is isolated and fuel polished when the swell gets up. Fuel transferred when the trim changes.

Changing one filter for the engine and one for the polisher per year seems to work for me - and is cost effective.

Am I missing something?
Is there actual guidance on using this set-up?
Racor filters have' Aquablock' media. I've never seen a limit on the time a Racor filter can be immersed in fuel.

Comments welcome!
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Old 02-25-2020, 09:40 PM   #2
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One season or 250 hours. The first time I pulled my racor elements after purchase they looked like they were dipped in asphalt. Black and chunky. Since then they have never looked like that again. The PO must not have changed them in 1000 hours.
I change the element, fill the filter, purge the air, check for leaks, then run on that filter one full day. The next day during pre-start checks switch over to the other clean filter and run on that for the next 250 hours or season. That way I KNOW the backup is ready to go. This season I added a tell-tale vacuum gauge. So far it has not moved off zero.
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Old 02-25-2020, 09:53 PM   #3
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Roughly annually also. I swap the engine primaries every few runs.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:02 PM   #4
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Every oil change 150 hours when a oil change is scheduled. I have a single raycor. The peace of mind when in water i should have not chanced, is worth the small price of a filter cartage.
The first thing I start thinking as the water conditions worsen, is the state of the fuel filter and the engine hours from the last change out.
I use a fuel conditioner. A couple of oz. of SeaFoam and Marvel Mystery oil. every fueling. I use 5 gallon jerry jugs to fuel,, bring 10 gallons down to the boat each check stop till tank is full.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:04 PM   #5
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Whenever the vacuum guages say it is time. If you don't have the ability to view them "live", then get the kind with the drag needles.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:05 PM   #6
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I have not been very good about changing mine but they have never been dirty. My Racors are easy to change but the secondaries are a pain to change and bleed. I replaced my port Racor with a MA version and also added the Racor 12 volt priming pump so it will be easier to prime the secondaries in the future. I have a MA version for the starboard engine that I will install next year when I pull the starboard engine.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:42 PM   #7
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A vacuum gauge between the Racor and the lift pump will show you when. I change at 500 hours when my gauge has moved from zero to about 7".
But I run clean fuel & tanks, add a good biocide every fueling and have 2 micron elements. In 500 hours my Detroit mains have moved more than 35,000 gallons thru the Racor.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:48 PM   #8
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Change on-engine fuel filters every engine service (every year or so). Use Racor "off" engine filters one at a time. One is changed about every year or so, and definitely when engine can't achieve maximum RPM. I'm not over-propped.
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Old 02-26-2020, 02:02 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al View Post
Every oil change 150 hours when a oil change is scheduled. I have a single raycor. The peace of mind when in water i should have not chanced, is worth the small price of a filter cartage.
The first thing I start thinking as the water conditions worsen, is the state of the fuel filter and the engine hours from the last change out.
I use a fuel conditioner. A couple of oz. of SeaFoam and Marvel Mystery oil. every fueling. I use 5 gallon jerry jugs to fuel,, bring 10 gallons down to the boat each check stop till tank is full.
Marvel Mystery Oil is about the worst additive for today's ultra low sulphur fuel which is already deficient in lubricity. MMO decreases lubricity even further. Let me guess. Bob Smith recommended its use in Lehman engines. Not trying to flippant but I humbly suggest that you do a bit of research rather than rely on my assertions.
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Old 02-26-2020, 05:19 AM   #10
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It amazes me that anyone actually used a product called "sea foam" or "marvel mystery oil".
Reeks of quackery and snake oil to me.

Is there any actual science behind any of them?
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Old 02-26-2020, 06:47 AM   #11
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I change my primary fuel filter filters according to the vacuum gauge or when I start getting surface rust on the filter, whatever comes first. My tanks are clean so its always been a bit of rust that tells me its time.
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Old 02-26-2020, 08:40 AM   #12
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Primary when cued by vacuum gauge or when I felt like it (usually the latter since I can only recall doing it per the gauge once). Typically changed secondary at same time, easy to do with fuel primer pumps and in our case very easy access to the spin-on secondary.

Detroit 8v92TI. Added pressure gauges before the secondary just because I could; they never came into play in telling me the secondary needed changing. Primaries were 30 micron, secondaries Detroit branded, 7 micron IIRC, both per Detroit rec. Always managed refueling around high volume fuel docks or straight from the truck. No additives unless they had already been mixed in by the fuel dock, like ValveTec.
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Old 02-26-2020, 09:04 AM   #13
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OK, I'll admit it. I rarely look at my vacuum gauge. I did check it once when my engine died (both supply lines were OFF) It was pegged. Otherwise I don't generally look at it.

I change both filters, the two big Raycors and the two secondaries on the engine, every year, in the fall. I do switch the valve every outing. My outings are generally a week or so long. When I first got the boat the filters were nasty with sediment. They look like new every year since then.

Now about "Seafoam" and "Mystery Oil". Both are fine products. I use each of them when conditions call for their use. I have a scooter which had sat for 5 years and ran rough, a shot of seafoam for the first few tanks helped a lot. Same for my riding lawnmower when it got water in the gas. I used Mystery oil to break a "stuck" engine once and used it in my tractor just because the tractor was 50 years old and someone told me it would help. Maybe it did..

Both are reasonably priced, what can it hurt?

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Old 02-26-2020, 09:05 AM   #14
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From Racor FAQs. I believe the annual change is based on their 1 year for aquabloc media after package is opened....


As a guideline, change a fuel filter element every 500 hours, 10,000 miles, every other oil change, annually, or at first indication of power loss, whichever occurs first. Ideally, you use a vacuum gauge to monitor filter restriction, and change your filter when the gauge reads 5 to 8 inHg above the starting vacuum (about 7 to 10 inHg is typical). This insures that your filter is still removing water at high efficiency. You can change out at higher vacuum, but water removal efficiency will be impacted as the vacuum goes up.


https://www.racornews.com/racor-faq
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Old 02-26-2020, 09:46 AM   #15
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I normally change mine annually in the spring after my 6 hour run from the winter storage marina to my summer slip.
This is typical of how they look.
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Old 02-26-2020, 11:07 AM   #16
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Personally, I now change my fuel filters every year, which averages about 200 - 250 hours. I tried going 2 seasons which was over 500 hours, and the vacuum gauge still was not showing any appreciable increase (read about 4 iirc).
I contacted Racor directly (Parker) and specifically asked about the "concern" with leaving the second (backup) filter sitting for a year full of clean fuel before switching over to use it for an additional year. Parker said that was no problem and it would not diminish the filter's performance at all. They also stated that you did not (within reason) need to be concerned with shelf life, however, try to use your oldest filter first (rotate stock in other words) but protect them from sources of contamination when stored.
Each to their own, but I don't understand the "alternate from one filter (primary) to the other" each time out. Wouldn't that mean that you are "dirtying" both filters and should one become blocked, the other would already be almost as bad?? I thought the concept of 2 filters with a control mechanism was to allow a seamless switchover just for that purpose? Seems switching back and forth would defeat the purpose. If concerned about how dirty your filters are, change them mid season or more often???

Anyway, changing annually (one Racor and the on engine) is probably actually overkill, but it does ensure my engine runs well. My fuel system flows about 50-60 gal/hour with the vast majority of it being returned to the tank so my fuel is polished regularly by the engine system. The fuel in the clear bowl always looks "pristine", and I can never get any water out of the bowl (always fuel).
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Old 02-26-2020, 11:30 AM   #17
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Quote:
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Roughly annually also. I swap the engine primaries every few runs.
Doesn’t this essentially leave you with two dirty fuel filters and no clean one to switch to if needed?

I change the used filter yearly and switch to the standby. I screwed a 5” PCV pipe to the ceiling of each engine room and I can store 1/2 dozen unopened filters there for immediate use. Just cut a slot in the side of the pipe and you can get a finger in to slide the next one to the front. New filters are added to the rear. I too have an electric priming pump for each engine. I use a single small Racor on each of my generators and change them when I do the mains yearly. I top them up from a jug of diesel I keep in the generator room.
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Old 02-26-2020, 11:30 AM   #18
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I was told every 250hrs or every other year. Which for us is about the same.
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Old 02-26-2020, 11:44 AM   #19
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I was told every 250hrs or every other year. Which for us is about the same.

Told by Racor/Parker?
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Old 02-26-2020, 11:55 AM   #20
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It amazes me that anyone actually used a product called "sea foam" or "marvel mystery oil".
Reeks of quackery and snake oil to me.

Is there any actual science behind any of them?
Sea Foam has been around a long time. I've used it on my outboard motors a lot over the years, and it's pretty good at de-carboning the cylinders. I admit I don't understand the actual mechanics, but I have seen some pretty amazing results. The best was a Ford Galaxie I bought with a 351 Cleveland in it, that was knocking like crazy until I did the de-carboning thing with the Sea Foam. Instantly, no more knock. (The science behind that is that the carbon deposits can cause pre-ignition of the gasoline, which results in the knock, just as if you didn't have enough octane).

For at least that purpose, it works well, in my experience.

SEA FOAM HISTORY:

Sea Foam Sales Company was born with a focus on safe and effective products that help engines and equipment run cleaner and last longer.

The Sea Foam story began in the 1930s, when Fred Fandrei, a salesman in the petroleum industry, wanted to spend more time fishing than fixing his outboard motor because of fuel-related problems. With the goal of finding the perfect petroleum blend, Fred created a formula that would stop fuel from going bad and help his motor run better. The formula became quite popular among his fishing friends. He began selling it to local fishermen in beer bottles and quart jars, naming the formula “Sea Foam” after a friend in Florida called and asked for some of that “Sea Foam stuff.”

Sea Foam Motor Treatment is now one of the best-selling automotive additives in North America. Sea Foam products have attracted a passionate following as the proven choice for mechanics, vehicle enthusiasts, and all sorts of people who love or depend on engines.

We’ve grown since our humble beginnings, but our focus is still the same: safe products that are proven to work and keep engines and equipment running their best.
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