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Old 10-07-2020, 08:40 PM   #1
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How does your dinghy hang?

It took me 4 days to get out of Lake Michigan thanks to some harsh weather. There were a few light casualties, and thankfully no injuries or serious losses. I discovered this in the slip at Cheboygan and had to sit down. So very close to damaging the dinghy and maybe losing the outboard.



The dinghy hangs from St. Croix davits on Dyneema lines connected to wire gated carabiners mounted to a block and tackle rig. In the course of the big Lake Michigan waves, the stern carabiner let loose of its wire gate leaving the Dyneema line eye hanging on to the notch in the 'biner. Very thankful it did not let go.

Rather than carabiners, my mentor recommends Pelican Hooks. They are on order. What do you guys use to hang your dinghy from davits?

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Old 10-07-2020, 08:57 PM   #2
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The pelican hook pictured does not look like a good choice for the intended use
and it could cause abrasion to the lines passing through it.
A rigging carabiner with a safety closure would be a better choice, IMO.
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Old 10-07-2020, 09:09 PM   #3
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I'm a little tentative on carabiners, but what about this variant? The hook carries all the load; the gate only keeps the lines inside.
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Old 10-07-2020, 09:38 PM   #4
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I've got the same davit but it has a couple threaded quick links on it. Kind of a pain to attach but secure.
I'm surprised that pelican hook straightened out, must have had a hell of a force or the bail was not locked for some reason.
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Old 10-07-2020, 10:50 PM   #5
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How about a pair of these, some of which have a 6,600-lb break strength?
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Old 10-08-2020, 12:45 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeadedToTexas View Post
I'm a little tentative on carabiners, but what about this variant? The hook carries all the load; the gate only keeps the lines inside.
This one looks good to go for me.
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Old 10-08-2020, 04:53 AM   #7
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How about a pair of these, some of which have a 6,600-lb break strength?
I use these, quick tug on the tag lines.... off I go.

If you ever need a release without lowering the dink or a line fouls and remains under tension, carabiners are troublesome
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Old 10-08-2020, 06:56 AM   #8
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Title of the thread had me wondering . . .
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Old 10-08-2020, 11:23 AM   #9
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One issue you have with that and any opening shackle is that you have two lines on it pulling at about 90 degrees, and pulling the shackle apart. Most are not designed for that type of loading. They are designed for a single point load pulling directly in line. Any shackle that opens is a C shape, inherently weak in the direction you are loading it.

What I'd do is to get a high quality welded ring. Undo the eye splices in the Dyneema and resplice them though the welded ring. Then shackle to the ring. Those are Brummel splices, very easy to do. If you don't want to mess with that, then a substantial SS chain quick link. Or even a screw shackle. Both of these may distort from overload, but the ends of the C are held together with something more than hope.

Another way might be to cow hitch the existing eye splices onto a welded ring, it the other ends of those lines can be freed.
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Old 10-08-2020, 11:35 AM   #10
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Not sure what you are talking about 90 degrees...unless you rig the opening part to the two legs of the bridle to the dingy.

If you rig then so the opening part is UP and hanging from a loop or metal part of the falls, it isn't an issue and is the way I use them.
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Old 10-08-2020, 02:19 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by HeadedToTexas View Post
I'm a little tentative on carabiners, but what about this variant? The hook carries all the load; the gate only keeps the lines inside.
Its what we use for hanging a 14ft alloy tender with a 30hp electric start ob and 25 litres of fuel
About 350kg

Lifted using hand crank trailer winch and 6mm dyneema
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Old 10-08-2020, 03:35 PM   #12
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Not sure what you are talking about 90 degrees...unless you rig the opening part to the two legs of the bridle to the dingy.
Which is exactly what he did.

Quote:
If you rig then so the opening part is UP and hanging from a loop or metal part of the falls, it isn't an issue and is the way I use them.
Then the hook has to be small enough fit through the small shackle on the triple block, and the bridle will not separate.

But that is how I rig them as well. Still should use one with a closed or welded eye.
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Old 10-08-2020, 04:26 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowgoesit View Post
Title of the thread had me wondering . . .
"How`s It Hanging? might work.
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Old 10-08-2020, 08:27 PM   #14
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My setup is similar in design, But:

I have had a failure of the block at the aft end of the dinghy, which weighs ~500 lb.
I now add a pair of safety lines from the davit arms to the transom of the dinghy, after hoisting. Once the safety lines are in place, I lower the dinghy so they take the weight, and set the hoisting line so that it is taking a small portion of the weight.

The safeties are attached at the davit arms, to a welded eye about 20" in from the end, and to the end. Once the dinghy is lowered onto those lines, it can't sway.
With the weight on the block significantly reduced, I don't have any concerns about its capacity being challenged.

The bow end of the dinghy weighs ~250 lb. so doesn't need the same, though at times I do add a safety there too.

This approach will take the strain off your gated carabiner to the same extent.
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Old 10-08-2020, 08:32 PM   #15
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Safety lines that bear the weight instead of the lifting apparatus. Smart! I like that.
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Old 10-23-2020, 12:55 PM   #16
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Everyone has mentioned a better way to attach it. My hanging davits had the to lines permanently attached to a ring and stayed attached to the pulley at the bottom of the line. The two ends then hooked to separate eye hooks attached to the dinghy.

I might recommend also that once you have the dinghy raised all the way up, that you take the tail end of the lines and wrap the line over and under the end of your inflated sponson on the dinghy and they pull it snug and cleat it off or tie it to the hardward on your davits.

Do the same on your bow eye or rings.

This keeps the dinghy from swinging violently if you start tossing and turning.

Lastly, that little 1/8" diameter pin on your pulley/tackle broke on mine and the only thing holding the dingy to the boat was the line around the sponson.
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Old 10-23-2020, 01:21 PM   #17
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I switched from cables with crimped lugs over to these a few months ago and couldn't be happier. no more "frayed" cables that scratch/cut your hands/legs. More "plyable" and easier to clip in, especially if water is a bit rougher.


The C-Level Davit Lifting Sling is designed for boats that are stored on davits
(2) Slings Required for a (2) Arm Davit Systems*
May also be used for single point lifting systems or lifting with a halyard
Safe Working Load: 1000 lbs per pair
Test Strength: 3800 lbs
1" UV resistant webbing
Stainless Steel quick-release snap shackles & Stainless O-ring
Size: 21" Davit Sling (Based on the length of webbing on one leg))

https://www.defender.com/product.jsp?id=98591
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Old 10-23-2020, 01:41 PM   #18
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Dinghy on Davits

I have found that securing the raised dinghy from Any Movement is critical to reducing loads and risks. I use a ratchet strap (from far side of transom to opposite end davit - transom mount end), a line tied from near side of transom to same end davit - transom mount end) and a line from far side of dinghy bow to same end davit - transom mount end). The two lines are doubled back and tied through a bowline for 2X mechanical advantage. All this once the dinghy is fully hoisted and cleated. Takes about 2 minutes and holds the dinghy/outboard nearly perfectly motionless, even in a seaway. Any movement while underway is exaggerated and bad.
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Old 10-23-2020, 05:18 PM   #19
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Regardless of what you use in the routine use of the dink, any time spent in transit with the least threat of challenging seas should be preceded by a walkaround of the vessel looking for trouble - basic seamanship. My own review has always included extra lines to secure dinks beyond the normal lifting tackle. I used to have cargo straps with stainless steel ratchets to secure the dink on the trawler.
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Old 10-23-2020, 05:35 PM   #20
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"I have found that securing the raised dinghy from Any Movement is critical to reducing loads and risks."
This advice from Bill is not only excellent, but critical in my estimation. I first received this info from the owner of a davit manufacturing company, and he stated that it should always be done before getting underway. You never know when you may experience unexpected waves including large wakes, or bad (a turn) weather.
To achieve this, you can use the "safety" lines discussed above, but the dinghy needs to be secure for not only up and down but side to side and fore and aft swinging as well. The inboard tube of the inflatable should be nestled as close as possible into the elbow of the davit and secured in place. The securing methods will vary slightly based on the exact davit, boat, and inflatable. Attachment points, etc. vary.
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