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Old 01-20-2018, 06:43 PM   #21
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For me, applying some judicious power, maybe more than once, after setting, is as much a test of the set as a dig in procedure.
The abstemious Nigel Calder recommends making a cup of tea after anchoring, and watching chosen landmarks for any change of position which might suggest dragging.
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Old 01-20-2018, 07:45 PM   #22
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I usually anchor in limestone covered by shallow sand or weeds. I use a Marsh anchor which is very uncommon outside South Australia, but is the most popular anchor here.

The anchor doesn't "set" like other anchors. In shallow sand it drags along the limestone bed until it finds a ledge to grab. In weedy/reefy areas the bottom is usually more broken up, and the the anchor will grab immediately.

Either way I test the hold with a strong pull (about 2000 rpm) after setting anchor, and again after a tidal or wind change if I'm awake.
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Old 01-20-2018, 07:54 PM   #23
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This bring a question to my sick mind. Up here most of the anchorage I go are thick heavy clay. When set you are set and to pull the anchor I pull the rode by hand (if no wind) then chain until I am right on top of the anchor than need to put engine in strong reverse to break out. My question is when you are set on rock, limestone or any type of rock, what is the process to pull out?

L
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Old 01-20-2018, 08:02 PM   #24
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absolutely...no one way is correct....

only experience and trial and error give each boat and skipper the right answer.
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Old 01-20-2018, 08:48 PM   #25
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I drop it and let the current set it, check landmarks and gps location.
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Old 01-20-2018, 10:14 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Lou_tribal View Post
This bring a question to my sick mind. Up here most of the anchorage I go are thick heavy clay. When set you are set and to pull the anchor I pull the rode by hand (if no wind) then chain until I am right on top of the anchor than need to put engine in strong reverse to break out. My question is when you are set on rock, limestone or any type of rock, what is the process to pull out?

L


Lou, The same method is used to retrieve an anchor with almost any type of bottom. The only thing that varies is the likelihood of getting stuck.

I havenít lost an anchor yet but some people run a second line from the bottom of the anchor to a buoy at surface. This can be used to pull the anchor backwards.
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Old 01-20-2018, 10:48 PM   #27
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I carry dive gear, but have not hung an anchor since I started carrying it. I stuck one once, a much larger boat was unable to free it and gave up, then "magically" it freed itself. I was in about 40' of water, and the current must have carried the line under a rock (big rocks around there) when the tide switched.

The Danforth Hi Tensile had one damaged fluke on it...

I have seen lots of anchors damaged by "power pulling" them on a float up here. I think usually the float buoy is too small for the anchor and there isn't enough lift to start the anchor "up", so it just rips it out of the bottom instead of lifting it off.
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Old 01-20-2018, 11:29 PM   #28
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I motor upwind of my desired location, and then turn back downwind (or down current) and take it out of gear while coasting. Drop while still moving and play out enough line to be happy, then cleat off on the Sampson post and watch my rode stretch out and feel the boat pivot on the hook.
I can tell if it's a good set by how the boat stops, pivots, and what the rode does when the hook sets. Another happy Rocna owner, and I usually set at about 4:1 scope unless I expect high winds.
I do that also...it's sometimes called the yachtsman's drop - love it.

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I own a Rocna. You drop the anchor with 7:1 scope (all chain), attach the snubber, and turn the engine off. Mother nature takes care of the rest.
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...or this, depending on situation and direction I came from. I have a Super Sarca. 's'all they need...
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Old 01-20-2018, 11:34 PM   #29
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Lou, The same method is used to retrieve an anchor with almost any type of bottom. The only thing that varies is the likelihood of getting stuck.

I havenít lost an anchor yet but some people run a second line from the bottom of the anchor to a buoy at surface. This can be used to pull the anchor backwards.
Or you get yourself a Super Sarca, which can be tripped if the need arises, without all that floaty stuffing round. 'Cause the time you foul, by Murphy's law, will be the time you didn't set the floaty thingy.
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Old 01-21-2018, 01:03 PM   #30
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How do you set your anchor?

Had a Delta anchor and anchoring was always a stressful experience for a newbie like me. Upgraded to a Mantus and now I just look to see how other boats are oriented, point that way, drop the anchor to the bottom (I marked every 25 ft on the rode), go into reverse and continue to slowly let out the rode so it makes a line on the ocean floor, then stop laying it down at around 3:1 if it's a short stay and conditions are good (more scope otherwise).

I then continue in reverse and use my finger against a reference point to ensure we're not dragging, then stay in neutral for a minute or two until I "feel" comfortable that we're not going anywhere, then cut the engine and put on the snubber system I bought from Mantus as well. Or of it's a short stay I'll use one of my bow lines and tie it across both cleats on the bow while capturing the rode in the middle so it takes the stress off the windlass.

For what it's worth, the Mantus has set on the first time everytime so far. The Delta would sometimes take 2 or 3 attempts.

QUESTION: Should I not be setting the anchor without first using snubber to take the stress off the windlass?
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Old 01-21-2018, 01:11 PM   #31
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QUESTION: Should I not be setting the anchor without first using snubber to take the stress off the windlass?
Do you have a Sampson post or some other strong tie off point on your bow?
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Old 01-21-2018, 01:27 PM   #32
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Do you have a Sampson post or some other strong tie off point on your bow?


No. Just have two bow cleats and the windlass.Click image for larger version

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Old 01-21-2018, 01:37 PM   #33
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QUESTION: Should I not be setting the anchor without first using snubber to take the stress off the windlass?

Many will set the anchor using the windlass only. I think their rational is that in a typical set, they arenít putting a lot of pressure on the windlass and the pressure is short lived.

I donít necessarily agree. I have a snubber that I use to set the anchor (a chain lock would be ideal). After the anchor is set, I then setup a bridle.

I have a cheap chain hook spliced to a 6í length of three strand nylon. When setting, I just put the hook on the chain and the line is cleated. The windlass is then detensioned and the anchor is set. If it is just a lunch hook in calm conditions, Iíll use all 6í of the snubber and leave it at that. If overnight or there is wind and/or current, the bridle is put out.

I am sure that I am more cautious than I need to be. OTOH, my windlass is an expensive piece of equipment that Iíd like to last a while. So, I try to take care of it.
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Old 01-21-2018, 01:37 PM   #34
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No. Just have two bow cleats and the windlass.Attachment 72279
That seems weird to me, but I've only been at this for about five years...others with more experience should be chiming in soon.

Perhaps it's okay for a soft-ish tug while setting the anchor?
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Old 01-21-2018, 01:47 PM   #35
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BruceK wins for the use of "abstemious"!!!

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Old 01-21-2018, 02:48 PM   #36
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BruceK wins for the use of "abstemious"!!!


I had to look that one up. I may try to use it one day.
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Old 01-22-2018, 01:16 AM   #37
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BruceK wins for the use of "abstemious"!!!

Absolutely. I'm with Nigel Calder as well. Get a decent anchor, then have a cup of tea and let it gently set itself. Then there are no concerns re overloading the windlass, (winch in Oz speak), or fiddling around swapping from short snubbers to long bridles, etc, etc, etc. Remember, it's all meant to be fun people..!
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Old 01-22-2018, 06:31 AM   #38
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Veerryyy Sloowlly ...

I get on my reenforced rubber gloves and go out on the bow. Open the box w the rode in it and pull out the chain and wire rope (3í). Then go back and canoiter w Chris at the helm through the window. When we are stopped at the preferred drop spot (established prior by going around the anchorage staring at the GPS and the shore). I go fwd and lower the anchor paying out the rode. Faster if itís windy .. slower if not. When the anchor hits bottom I pick it up about a foot and give Chris the back down very slowly hand signal. When I see a bit of way on I slowly pay out some rode keeping the anchor on the botton just barely. This way we lay out the rode basically in a straight line w the anchor shank pointing at the boat. Then I pull a small amount of tension and feel the bottom through the rode and have an Idea what itís like especially if itís rocky. Very rare in the PNW. After the rode gets close to a 45 degree rake to it I pay out line faster w little or no tension. Signal Chris to cut power w enough way on. Power on and off. I make the line fast to my dedicated anchor cleat when (per the marked rode) there is enough line out for one more scope # than we plan to anchor at. 4-1 to anchor at 3-1 ... typical. Then reverse again in and out of gear a few times (2 or three typ) and let soak at idle for a minute or so then increase to 1400rpm until the line gets real tight. 1000rpm is idle. While doing that I pull hard sideways by hand against the line on deck and feel for telltale vibrations and tightness or a tendency to loosen up. After 5 or ten seconds of that I give Chris the cut power signal and secure all loose gear. Turn on the propane for dinner.
That's almost exactly what I used to do until I got a Mantus. Now, I just let it down to the bottom, let out the proper scope as the boat drifts back, give a quick check with some reverse, and open a beer.
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Old 01-22-2018, 06:41 AM   #39
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For water depth under 10 ft, turn upwind/into current, stop, drop, reverse easy paying out chain until the 60 ft marker is at the roller. Let the chain come tight. Pay out a little more and attach the Mantus hook and snubber line so that the 60 ft marker is at the waterline. Put in reverse at idle and check for holding. All good, engine off. For 10-20 ft, same drill except 90 ft mark at the waterline. Over 20 ft, move somewhere else. 20 Kg Rocna Vulcan and 105 ft of 5/16 chain.
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Old 01-22-2018, 07:18 AM   #40
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That seems weird to me, but I've only been at this for about five years...others with more experience should be chiming in soon.

Perhaps it's okay for a soft-ish tug while setting the anchor?
Your point is valid. A Samson post or similar stout center line tie point is essential. But, look at the commercial guys in your area that have those stout on deck drums, an alternative that I'd guess Beneteau wouldn't consider.
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