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Old 07-10-2018, 03:12 PM   #81
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5" plus 14" above the waterline plus a flap sounds good to me. Then water backing up into your exhaust manifold is unlikely to be the cause of the water.


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Old 07-10-2018, 03:50 PM   #82
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I think water ingestion from a muffler exhaust etc... on a diesel engine is going to have catastrophic results, so unlikely. Gas engine has some combustion chamber room to suck water in by the exhaust and not result in instant destruction.
Maybe steam vapor could build up, I dont know, still seems unlikely.

If you can not find anything wrong, then something unknown, one time event, not likely to repeat.
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Old 07-10-2018, 04:27 PM   #83
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I think water ingestion from a muffler exhaust etc... on a diesel engine is going to have catastrophic results, so unlikely. Gas engine has some combustion chamber room to suck water in by the exhaust and not result in instant destruction.
Maybe steam vapor could build up, I dont know, still seems unlikely.

If you can not find anything wrong, then something unknown, one time event, not likely to repeat.
And if it was a back flow of water into cylinder I don't think that I would have been able to start the engine so easily right? I don't see how the engine could ave start right away if cylinders contained water.
But I need to find out what is the cause, I don't like the one time event as this could reproduce again without knowing hat is the cause.

Another cause I was thinking about is a cracked exhaust manifold that would make water leak in the engine when you stop and exhaust gases pressure drop but again would mean water in cylinders and would be hard to start the engine.

Just thinking out loud.


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Old 07-10-2018, 05:47 PM   #84
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Greetings,
Mr. ps. Not to dispute your "engine guy" but the "grayish" bit at the end of the dipstick could well be a reflection through clear oil of a shiny bit of stick as opposed to the slightly oxidized bit of stick between ADD and the end. Say hello to your engine guy. I still owe him and his mate a fancy dinner. Maybe Wendy's. I don't think they'll let me back into IHOP again after what happened last time...


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Old 07-10-2018, 07:10 PM   #85
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There is a tool that tests for hydrocarbons in your heat exchanger. If you have a blown head gasket hydrocarbons will leak into the cooling water. The tool should cost around $60.

Water in exhaust systems ends up in the cylinder and cause a hydrolocked engine. Oil cooler failures usually leave a trail of oil behind the boat, it is possible that your raw water pressure is higher than your oil pressure causing the water to enter the oil circuit. It’s also possible that the problem only occurs under certain conditions. I would have the oil cooler pressure tested by a radiator shop to be sure.
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Old 07-10-2018, 07:18 PM   #86
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Greetings,
Mr. ps. Not to dispute your "engine guy" but the "grayish" bit at the end of the dipstick could well be a reflection through clear oil of a shiny bit of stick as opposed to the slightly oxidized bit of stick between ADD and the end. Say hello to your engine guy. I still owe him and his mate a fancy dinner. Maybe Wendy's. I don't think they'll let me back into IHOP again after what happened last time...


I cannot wait to know what happened last time at IHOP, knowing you it must be something interesting lol

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Old 07-10-2018, 07:27 PM   #87
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And if it was a back flow of water into cylinder I don't think that I would have been able to start the engine so easily right? I don't see how the engine could ave start right away if cylinders contained water.
But I need to find out what is the cause, I don't like the one time event as this could reproduce again without knowing hat is the cause.

Another cause I was thinking about is a cracked exhaust manifold that would make water leak in the engine when you stop and exhaust gases pressure drop but again would mean water in cylinders and would be hard to start the engine.

Just thinking out loud.


L
If you have an Autozone, they will let your borrow the pressure tester for the engine. You put it on the radiator cap, and hand pump the pressure. Then watch and see if the gauge drops.
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Old 07-10-2018, 07:45 PM   #88
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There is a tool that tests for hydrocarbons in your heat exchanger. If you have a blown head gasket hydrocarbons will leak into the cooling water. The tool should cost around $60.

Water in exhaust systems ends up in the cylinder and cause a hydrolocked engine. Oil cooler failures usually leave a trail of oil behind the boat, it is possible that your raw water pressure is higher than your oil pressure causing the water to enter the oil circuit. Itís also possible that the problem only occurs under certain conditions. I would have the oil cooler pressure tested by a radiator shop to be sure.
Instead of having it pressure tested, I will do a test run without it and then if the test shows a smoking gun, I will replace it right away, after 24 years of service it deserves a peaceful retirement in the box of "keep it even if you won't ever use it anymore". In fact I will either replace it and add bypass valves or totally remove it base on temp reading during my test run. And this will give the opportunity of correctly fixing both oil coolers that are now just hanging in the air as well as changing all the oil lines that show aging signs. When I get the hands dirty I like to do everything at once

BUT, is it the one responsible for my pain, that is the real question that keep me awake at night!

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Old 07-10-2018, 08:31 PM   #89
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Is it possible over the winter a little coolant dribbled in, but laid in the bottom of the sump and only mixed with the oil when you ran it what, ten hours?

Oil laying in the sump will not be visible on the stick. Has to get mixed first.
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Old 07-10-2018, 08:49 PM   #90
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Is it possible over the winter a little coolant dribbled in, but laid in the bottom of the sump and only mixed with the oil when you ran it what, ten hours?

Oil laying in the sump will not be visible on the stick. Has to get mixed first.
I think that this would be an explanation that fit perfectly as this occurred at the first ride. But what would be the cause of the coolant leak during winter? Seal? Crack in the block?
One thing, in spring I changed the water heater. When removed coolant hoses I attached them high to avoid pouring coolant everywhere. Similarly when I installed the new heater, I connected one hose and hang the other high to fill it with coolant, fill the heater, etc by gravity. Would there be any way that this caused coolant overflow in engine? I don't think so but I may be wrong.

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Old 07-10-2018, 09:09 PM   #91
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Another point, if coolant would have moved to oil sump I would think that the coolant circuit would have lost any pressure. When in spring I removed the old water heater I was forced to cut the connected hose as I was not able to remove it. I must confess hoses were pressurised as as soon as I did a small cut in the hose I received a good spray of coolant in the face

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Old 07-11-2018, 05:26 AM   #92
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I don't think water heater work could do it, provided engine did not overheat afterward.

Gaskets and seals can weep when very cold and seal ok once warm. And engine got very cold last winter.
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Old 07-13-2018, 01:18 PM   #93
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Found identical problem on our sailboat with an 80 hp Lehman. I removed the oil cooler, sealed one of the water fittings and one of the oil fittings. Blew through the unsealed water fitting and could feel air coming out the unsealed oil fitting. Clearly had a breakthrough in the oil cooler. I had a spare on board. Change the oil twice and all was well. When I ordered a new oil cooler to replace my spare I was told that it is actually a little unusual for water to get in the oil since the oil pressure is generally higher than the water pressure. Obviously that wasn't the case with my engine...
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Old 07-13-2018, 01:34 PM   #94
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Found identical problem on our sailboat with an 80 hp Lehman. I removed the oil cooler, sealed one of the water fittings and one of the oil fittings. Blew through the unsealed water fitting and could feel air coming out the unsealed oil fitting. Clearly had a breakthrough in the oil cooler. I had a spare on board. Change the oil twice and all was well. When I ordered a new oil cooler to replace my spare I was told that it is actually a little unusual for water to get in the oil since the oil pressure is generally higher than the water pressure. Obviously that wasn't the case with my engine...
Thank you for your input. Hopefully it will be the same for me and it will make me a very happy man just to fit a new oil cooler.

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Old 07-14-2018, 05:42 PM   #95
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I still think an oil assay is needed.
Oil in water is mustard color.
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Old 07-14-2018, 06:07 PM   #96
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I still think an oil assay is needed.
Oil in water is mustard color.
Don't worry it is my intend to get an oil analysis of the emulsified grey mud and the next oil change I will do next weekend so I get a clear picture of what is in.

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Old 07-14-2018, 09:10 PM   #97
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I still think an oil assay is needed.
Oil in water is mustard color.



You keep saying that. I agree with the oil sampling just to get an idea of overall engine health. I have never seen freshwater oil mix turn any form of yellow though. Out of 25 years working on engines of all kinds, it's always looked like milk or a light grayish color. If I'm not mistaken, Lou_tribal has said that his engine uses coolant, not raw water, and his coolers are raw water cooled. I may be understanding that wrong. I have never seen brackish or salt water in oil, it may be yellow. I don't think that is the case here. I am in agreement with everyone else, it's probably an internal oil cooler leak somewhere. With Lou stating that there's not been an overheat situation, and the engine is running a touch cold, I doubt it to be an engine issue. I feel that he has a good handle on things and we should wait to hear back from him before making more suggestions.
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Old 07-14-2018, 09:17 PM   #98
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You keep saying that. I agree with the oil sampling just to get an idea of overall engine health. I have never seen freshwater oil mix turn any form of yellow though. Out of 25 years working on engines of all kinds, it's always looked like milk or a light grayish color. If I'm not mistaken, Lou_tribal has said that his engine uses coolant, not raw water, and his coolers are raw water cooled. I may be understanding that wrong. I have never seen brackish or salt water in oil, it may be yellow. I don't think that is the case here. I am in agreement with everyone else, it's probably an internal oil cooler leak somewhere. With Lou stating that there's not been an overheat situation, and the engine is running a touch cold, I doubt it to be an engine issue. I feel that he has a good handle on things and we should wait to hear back from him before making more suggestions.
First thing first, I will live my world cup final tomorrow . Then for sure I will keep you updated next weekend when I will be back to the boat do pursue with this mess cleanup.

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Old 07-14-2018, 09:28 PM   #99
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First thing first, I will live my world cup final tomorrow . Then for sure I will keep you updated next weekend when I will be back to the boat do pursue with this mess cleanup.

L

Ahhh life. It gets in all of my ways. Honey made sure the honey dos were honey dids this weekend.
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Old 07-16-2018, 10:21 AM   #100
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You keep saying that. I agree with the oil sampling just to get an idea of overall engine health. I have never seen freshwater oil mix turn any form of yellow though. Out of 25 years working on engines of all kinds, it's always looked like milk or a light grayish color. If I'm not mistaken, Lou_tribal has said that his engine uses coolant, not raw water, and his coolers are raw water cooled. I may be understanding that wrong. I have never seen brackish or salt water in oil, it may be yellow. I don't think that is the case here. I am in agreement with everyone else, it's probably an internal oil cooler leak somewhere. With Lou stating that there's not been an overheat situation, and the engine is running a touch cold, I doubt it to be an engine issue. I feel that he has a good handle on things and we should wait to hear back from him before making more suggestions.
I too have seem a lot of water in oil and it has always been milky or mustard. Web searches tend to report the same. YMMV
https://www.powertraindirect.com/how...ng-engine-oil/
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