Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-16-2021, 04:47 AM   #1
Member
 
City: Campbell River
Join Date: Feb 2021
Posts: 8
Hello from a lost noob on Vancouver Island

Hello, I basically know nothing about boats other than what I have managed to learn on the internet. I am looking to buy a boat asap maybe but it has to be the right boat. I am quite poor but have about $100000 fun money for this venture. I have an interesting story and looking for a lot of advice.
I am looking for maybe a 30 - 36 foot cruiser the one I have my eye on now is a Ugggh 1996 Bayliner 3587.
__________________
Advertisement

Salty Dawgg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 05:23 AM   #2
Member
 
City: Campbell River
Join Date: Feb 2021
Posts: 8
Smile more info

I started reading New Member Orientation and realized I needed to give more info I was trying to be brief, my mistake.

I am a 61 year old lone male and like it that way.
I am somewhat disabled, we can get into that if you wish.

The boat I seek is for I dont know exactly what yet but either to cruise the local islands, liveaboard or just as a man cave docked at a local marina.
Fun money is to be enjoyed, perhaps wasted. If I lose $100k once I wont cry.
Wrong attitude perhaps but you dont know my story. I am not reckless or dangerous in any manner but I have no fear and I dont take life seriously anymore.
The boat I want is a low maintenance twin diesel minimum of 350 Hp total. Reliable, not a ton of hours. I dont want a lot of speed but I dont want to crawl either. 20 knots sounds maybe about right.
Please help , all responses matter. Thank you
__________________

Salty Dawgg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 06:19 AM   #3
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,311
Greetings eh?
Welcome aboard. The very first thing I might suggest is put aside the ASAP for a bit and take your time in your search. Finding the "right" boat might take longer than you expect.
Nothing wrong with a Bayliner IMO. Horses for courses.
Enjoy the chase and get a GOOD marine survey
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 06:34 AM   #4
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 23,300
$100,000 fun money and "quite poor"?


Ugggg to a Bayliner when self described as "quite poor"....????


Please remember there are a lot of boat owners here that could only afford a lot less and some with all kinds of financial backgrounds own Bayliners...even being their first choice.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 06:55 AM   #5
Member
 
City: Campbell River
Join Date: Feb 2021
Posts: 8
Thank You, advice taken
Salty Dawgg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 06:56 AM   #6
Member
 
City: Campbell River
Join Date: Feb 2021
Posts: 8
Thx, advice taken
Salty Dawgg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 09:33 AM   #7
Guru
 
IRENE's Avatar
 
City: Sequim, WA, USA
Vessel Name: Irene
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 40II
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 1,009
Welcome

So these folks ran a Bayliner 4087 all over BC, putting on over 4000 hours. This should give you an idea of the adventures you can have with that boat.

https://mvdirona.com/2010/01/bayliner-4087/

The 3587 is the same boat, I believe, without the cockpit. They were offered with gas and diesel power.

Good Luck
__________________
Jeff
MV IRENE
IRENE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 10:23 AM   #8
Guru
 
Pete Meisinger's Avatar
 
City: Oconto, WI
Vessel Name: Best Alternative
Vessel Model: 36 Albin Aft Cabin
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,928
One thing you should rethink is the twin diesel and 20 mph cruise speed. Read th thread about trawler vs express. Especially cruising mostly alone and at your age, SLOW DOWN, you will be glad you did. Go with a single diesel.

pete
Pete Meisinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 11:21 AM   #9
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 11,145
Welcome aboard. Have a lot of fun with your search.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you arenít one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 12:06 PM   #10
Guru
 
Max Simmons's Avatar
 
City: Everett, WA
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 38'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 681
Welcome. Camber River is a great home port for access to some of the most beautiful cruising on the planet. I'm jealous! Have you looked at the Bayliner 3488? Most have the twin Cummins 250HP and a decent layout for the size. With a "somewhat disability" it may help to have a open cockpit style boat for dock access rather than a aft cabin. I looked at a 3488 with a friend awhile back. The main drawback I saw was very skinny side decks for accessing the bow, which swayed him to purchase a 36' Lindel instead.
Happy Hunting!
Max Simmons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 01:23 PM   #11
Member
 
City: Campbell River
Join Date: Feb 2021
Posts: 8
Thank you , looking forward to an adventure
Salty Dawgg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 01:25 PM   #12
Member
 
City: Campbell River
Join Date: Feb 2021
Posts: 8
twin diesel is a preference , nothing locked in stone. 8 knots sounds like a perfect cruising speed but I dont want to be stuck at that speed, maybe I am thinking it wrong
Salty Dawgg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 01:30 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Spinner's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Vessel Name: Spinner
Vessel Model: 2003 Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 388
Good luck with your boating plans! Are you going to be running single-handed? Definitely think about access on and off the boat . I think a cockpit and door off the helm are both important, the cockpit being #1 on the list.

Regarding 20 knot “reasonable” speed, I have a few observations:
1) even with Diesel engines you are going to be burning a lot of fuel. Slow down and see your economy improve!
2) in my opinion, running at 20 knots in wood-strewn BC waters can be quite tiring if you are going to be the only operator. Back to comment 1, you get a lot more time to spot logs at speeds close to hull speed (around 7-8 knots for that length, I think).
__________________
Regards

Sue
42 Nordic Tug Spinner
Spinner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 02:14 PM   #14
Guru
 
Moonfish's Avatar


 
City: Port Townsend, WA
Vessel Name: Traveler
Vessel Model: Cheoy Lee 46 LRC
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,202
Welcome aboard, Salty Dawgg!

As you likely already know, there is a lot you don't know... LOL However, that does not mean you can't literally "dive off the deep end" and have a wonderful, grand, and fulfilling adventure. Look at LOTS of boats, talk to lots of folks, and have FUN!
__________________
Darren
Port Townsend, WA
m/v Traveler - '79 Cheoy Lee 46 LRC
https://www.pacificnwboatertested.com
Moonfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 02:15 PM   #15
Guru
 
firehoser75's Avatar
 
City: Nanaimo
Vessel Name: former owner of "Pilitak"
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,549
Hi Salty,
Welcome to the Forum from just south of you!
I agree with Sue (Spinner). Listen to her, especially regarding single handing which she does all the time.
My NT 37 burns 2 gallons of fuel per hour at 7-8 knots, but if I "crank it up" to 14 knots my fuel goes to about 17 gallons per hour (that's about $83 per hour vs. less than $10 per hour at hull speed!). Partially submerged debris is very common in this area, and having a chance to see it so you might avoid it, goes down the faster you go. Log strikes can be dangerous, and also can be expensive even if not dangerous.
I also recommend a single engine boat over twins, especially if you are "on a budget". With twins you have twice the maintenance costs and potentially twice the repair costs compared to a single.
Anyway, just my opinion.
__________________
Tom
Nanaimo, BC
firehoser75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 02:22 PM   #16
Guru
 
City: gulf coast
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 3,441
Rather than buying the wrong boat why not take some lessons and charter a boat or two to experience what it s all about and perhaps learn what features you might prefer in a boat. The company below is well known and in your area.

Anacortes Yacht Charters

Also might find charters and instruction here.

https://www.vancouverboatshow.ca/
bayview is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 02:33 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Island Cessna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 236
Welcome!
Campbell River is a beautiful area for a boater. I would echo the advice you have received so far.

I have been a pleasure boater around your area on and off for nearly 50 years, with my boating ranging from live aboard through weekend social and guest on friendís boats.

Take your time. You are in a perfect area to walk the docks and chat with owners. Most of us canít resist dropping whatever makes us look busy to talk about our boats, other boats, and boating life. Probably even show off our boat to someone truly interested. Your stated range of interests is still too wide to zero in on a specific size or style of boat.

Slow down your speed range! 4 of the 5 boats I have owned were slow, low powered, rugged displacement boats. The 5th was a twin engine planing hull, and the only one I regret buying. 8 knots would be my maximum, not my minimum speed. I spent a lot of time on a friendís twin 210hp 41í planing boat, usually based in CR in the summer. For the first year or two he cruised at 14 kts or so, and was constantly on pins and needles as the slightest bit of flotsam was potential disaster, it would literally suck driftwood you had avoided under the side of the hull into the prop. Remember when you admire all that water rushing out the stern in the wash, it had to rush into the prop from ahead too. He constantly fretted about fuel range and while he was anything but poor the cost was shocking. For the next 15+ years on the same boat he cruised at 8 or 9 knots, relaxed and enjoyed the journey, and refueled when it was conveniently available.

There are life circumstances, and geographical areas where speed is unquestionably a good or even essential thing, but your goals and geography donít sound like itís a necessity.

My comfort zone is a rugged, low powered single Diesel with a propeller deep down protected by a long keel.

Take your time and enjoy the ride, both in acquiring, and using your boat. You are dead center in a boating geography that is the envy of most of us!
Island Cessna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2021, 10:53 PM   #18
Member
 
City: Campbell River
Join Date: Feb 2021
Posts: 8
My biggest reason for twin diesels is that we have strong currents , even whirlpools in desolation sound , dont I need power?
Salty Dawgg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2021, 11:04 PM   #19
Guru
 
City: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island
Vessel Name: Capricorn
Vessel Model: Mariner 30 - Sedan Cruiser 1969
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,809
My suggestion is budget $80,000 for the boat and the remaining $20,000 for updating and repairs that will pop up quickly if they don't already exist. You can get something decent for $80,000.
rsn48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2021, 11:22 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Spinner's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Vessel Name: Spinner
Vessel Model: 2003 Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 388
You don’t need twins because of tides and currents. You go through the various tidal rapids at slack current for reasons that don’t include making way against the current. Tip: get a copy of the current year’s edition of Ports and Passes for tide and current information from Olympia, WA through Glacier Bay, Alaska.


There are many, many opinions (and posts) about twins vs single engine engines, but the one that I have seen most for having twin engines is the question of having an operable engine should one fail.
That risk can be mitigated by attention to fuel quality and good maintenance practices, in my opinion.
__________________

__________________
Regards

Sue
42 Nordic Tug Spinner
Spinner is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×