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Old 09-19-2022, 01:47 PM   #1
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Heating

What do you use for to heat the interior of your trawler when you are on the hook or a mooring away from shore power? My heating is a unit incorporated with air conditioning and needs shore power or the generator to operate. Fall, winter, spring boating gets pretty cool sometime.
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Old 09-19-2022, 02:01 PM   #2
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Diesel heater. Eberspracher (sp?). Webasto also makes them. We have reverse cycle a/c, but MUCH prefer the diesel heater for heating. Energy bovines that we are, we have been known to run rhe diesel heater and a/c together for brief periods to dehumidify in extreme humidity situations in Scandinavia, without getting too cold.
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Old 09-19-2022, 02:17 PM   #3
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We have reverse cycle a/c, but MUCH prefer the diesel heater for heating.
I’m debating heating source right now. Any reason you much prefer diesel heat? Is this hydronic or forced air?
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Old 09-19-2022, 02:41 PM   #4
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Forced air. You can duct the outlets where you want them…which is close to the floor. Keeps feet warm and the heat rises. A reverse cycle a/c has the outlet registers much higher. Heating with this can result in a ”warm” cabin which is still uncomfortably cold where your feet are.
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Old 09-19-2022, 02:43 PM   #5
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In the PNW, diesel heat makes a lot of sense. You already have the fuel, it heats up a cold boat quickly, and doesn’t take the generator to run. I’ve got a hydronic diesel furnace on our boat and love it. My prior two boats (both sailboats) I had forced air diesel heat. Also very nice.
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Old 09-19-2022, 02:58 PM   #6
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I have 2 heat sources. A 30,000 BTU diesel fireplace by Toyotomi and a Newport Dickinson Propane fireplace. Both are awesome and heat the boat up very quickly.
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Old 09-19-2022, 03:24 PM   #7
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We are big fans of our Wallas Spartan forced air diesel heater. Low amp draw and very fuel efficient while on the hook. We actually keep it on almost all winter while in the slip, too. Bonus is it's the quietest forced air heater on the market.
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Old 09-19-2022, 04:02 PM   #8
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Diesel is the most sensible heat source for on the hook.

Propane and alcohol are also sources.

Propane and alcohol do not need to be vented to the outside but that advantage does not over come the negative of fumes and moisture being released inside the cabin.

There are many options with diesel. Forced air, hydronic and stove.

Hydronic is the nicest for multiple zone comfort. It is also the most expensive to install. Forced air is almost as nice as hydronic for multiple zone control. It’s cheaper than hydronic to install but it’s more difficult to run a 3” hose than a 3/4” hose and forced air is noisier.

Stove style is the simplest and cheapest. Usually just mounted on a wall and vented straight up through the cabin top. It is the Worst with multiple zone control. It is visibly the least appealing. It is the lowest maintenance system.

Not knowing what your usage is it is hard to make a recommendation on which of the three systems would be appropriate.
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Old 09-19-2022, 04:06 PM   #9
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I use a 5 zone Hurricane Hydronic system but that would be overkill on a 35’.
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Old 09-19-2022, 05:01 PM   #10
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I am thinking more of a portable propane heater that I can move with me from the salon to the stateroom when I go to bed. Safe to run while I sleep. I have a 1997 Mainship 350.
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Old 09-19-2022, 05:08 PM   #11
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Be careful about risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.
https://www.thechecker.net/stories/b...xide-poisoning
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Old 09-19-2022, 05:13 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jclays View Post
I am thinking more of a portable propane heater that I can move with me from the salon to the stateroom when I go to bed. Safe to run while I sleep. I have a 1997 Mainship 350.
I am not a big fan of non vented alcohol or propane use. However, to answer your question. Look here.

https://www.practical-sailor.com/bel...-the-chill-off
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Old 09-19-2022, 05:18 PM   #13
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I do not like propane in a boat with out sniffers.
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Old 09-19-2022, 05:20 PM   #14
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Hydronic heater. They come with pex now to making the installation easier.
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Old 09-19-2022, 05:49 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tiltrider1 View Post
Diesel is the most sensible heat source for on the hook.

Propane and alcohol are also sources.

Propane and alcohol do not need to be vented to the outside but that advantage does not over come the negative of fumes and moisture being released inside the cabin.

There are many options with diesel. Forced air, hydronic and stove.

Hydronic is the nicest for multiple zone comfort. It is also the most expensive to install. Forced air is almost as nice as hydronic for multiple zone control. It’s cheaper than hydronic to install but it’s more difficult to run a 3” hose than a 3/4” hose and forced air is noisier.

Stove style is the simplest and cheapest. Usually just mounted on a wall and vented straight up through the cabin top. It is the Worst with multiple zone control. It is visibly the least appealing. It is the lowest maintenance system.

Not knowing what your usage is it is hard to make a recommendation on which of the three systems would be appropriate.
Propane produces DEADLY CARBON MONOXIDE so must always be vented outside.
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Old 09-19-2022, 05:54 PM   #16
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Odd that reverse cycle a/c is notably absent from conversation. Of course, it demands genset on all nite. But it is my go to for heat. Maybe 3 x per year.
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Old 09-19-2022, 06:01 PM   #17
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We bought an inexpensive (~$250) Chinese diesel heater for use when we were on the hard for a few months. It was just for temporary use. But we really liked it and are continuing to use it. It's mounted midship and keeps us cozy. 1/2 gallon per 24 hours.
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Old 09-19-2022, 06:33 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by jclays View Post
I am thinking more of a portable propane heater that I can move with me from the salon to the stateroom when I go to bed. Safe to run while I sleep. I have a 1997 Mainship 350.
One winter as a liveaboard in Seattle I used a Little Buddy portable propane heater on the coldest days and nights to add a little more heat. Unitl it ran away at full heat and could not be shut down. I could not close the valve either. I think it was frozen condensation that froze up the valve and regulator. It all looked pretty frosty to me. One of the waste components of propane is water. There may have been some water in the fuel. I just don't know. The entire unit was overheating. I took it out to the dock and tipped it over. Fortunately the tip over safety worked and it shut down. I never again ran it on high, nor did I run it when sleeping.
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Old 09-19-2022, 06:43 PM   #19
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Propane produces DEADLY CARBON MONOXIDE so must always be vented outside.
Propane does produce small amounts of Carbon Monoxide. This does not make it unsafe. The heaters all come with low Oxygen sensors and recommend the use of carbon monoxide sensors, something that should already be on all boats.

I already stated that I don’t like propane because of its higher risk. However, stating it must be vented outside is incorrect.
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Old 09-19-2022, 06:59 PM   #20
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American Tug 34, NL 6kw, 2 installed resistance heater, 2 reverse cycle A/C.
When the resistance are ON no room on the A/C bus for ANYTHING else other than the battery charger. Sure cant make coffee on the AC bus with both heaters ON. The water heater is a big NO NO too. Even in FL winters I have used the 2 resistance heaters to heat up the boat until the sun comes alive.
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