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Old 09-27-2021, 06:31 PM   #1
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Gulfcoast filter

I already have installed the gulfcoast f1 fuel filter and it worked so good was thinking of adding oil bypass filter as well,anyone with one installed i have a few questions i noticed they used to make the jr model it was for a roll of toilet paper but discontinued the smaller model and now have the o1 model for engines under 250 hp,what i also found was another company that uses the gulfcoast design and is call jackmaster anyone use or heard of them
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Old 09-28-2021, 07:16 AM   #2
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I already have installed the gulfcoast f1 fuel filter and it worked so good was thinking of adding oil bypass filter as well,anyone with one installed i have a few questions i noticed they used to make the jr model it was for a roll of toilet paper but discontinued the smaller model and now have the o1 model for engines under 250 hp,what i also found was another company that uses the gulfcoast design and is call jackmaster anyone use or heard of them
Hi,
I am certainly one of the rare trawlers cruising in european waters with Gulf Coast Filters and polishing fuel system. I am very happy with these products and recommand them. Of course when I needed to order from US new filters, it was a little bit expansive. I understood the possibility to insert roll of paper and order these Bounty from Wallmart. I am also certainly the only guy who is importing a full packet of Bounty roll papers from America!!!
I do not know about jackmaster but the plastic system with a sock used by original Gulf Coast filters can be installed several times with new roll of paper.
Below, install of my oil polishing system on a John Deere 6081 AFM75 heavy duty, fuel polishing system acting like a transfer pump for the three tanks, and the two prefilters with a jauge for the engine. Note that the box for oil filter is smaller, but the roll of paper is same size as diesel filters. The difference is the space let to collect water in diesel GFC filters.
As Mr Steve D'Antonio explained so well, polishing means only filtration. After a very poor experience with a small centrifugal separator in France, I am now installing a new Westfalia OTC2 centrifuge in addition of GFC polishing system.
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Old 09-28-2021, 08:40 AM   #3
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Is it true that with the oil filter you no longer have to fully change oil, just top up and change filters? Plus regular oil analysis of course.
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Old 09-28-2021, 08:45 AM   #4
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Is it true that with the oil filter you no longer have to fully change oil, just top up and change filters? Plus regular oil analysis of course.
Honestly, I consider this oil filter as a +. But I always replace my oil and filter installed on the JD engine every year.
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Old 09-28-2021, 01:00 PM   #5
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Honestly, I consider this oil filter as a +. But I always replace my oil and filter installed on the JD engine every year.
Whether it needs it or not?
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Old 09-28-2021, 01:07 PM   #6
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Thatís a good question Jack. Iíve always learned to just follow the manufacturerís direction. Thatís all thatís needed - no need to overkill.
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Old 09-28-2021, 01:27 PM   #7
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Is there much ash where you keep your vessel?
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Old 09-28-2021, 02:41 PM   #8
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I think you still need to check the additives in the oil. But they say it will extend oil changes a long time. You change the filter element and have to add oil for the oil that was left in the filter element. So there are some new additives in the make up oil. I would still do an oil sample at the recommended oil change interval to see how the oil is doing.
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Old 09-28-2021, 04:31 PM   #9
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I've used bypass filters since 1961. They clean the oil much better and allow longer times between changes if you test your oil. When the original toilet paper filter came out, people with gas engines were going 100,000 miles in their car before changing oil. And oil was still clear. I don't remember the interval for changing the paper, but I think 2000 miles. The cheap TP worked best. 10 rolls for a dollar, then. You can still find the Frantz filter online.

I've probably used most bypass filters made, but never Jackmaster. Looks like a big TP filter. I know fleets using Gulf Coast or similar, testing their oil, and going much longer between oil changes, I think 50,000-100,000 miles. There is a brand that uses 2 rolls of Bounty that works well, can't remember the name. It's commonly used by truckers. I know several truckers going more than a million miles before a rebuild. But if you keep up the filter changes on any bypass filter, you get less wear because the debris in the oil is much smaller. Also fuel is much cleaner with less debris. I use a 2 micron filter and haven't changed an injector in about 10 years. Some years 500+ hours on the mains.

I use a stand alone centrifuge now and never change my oil, just add as needed Detroits), and test about every 500 hours. Last oil change was 10 years ago. 2 Detroits and 2 generators, that's a lot of oil not bought. Excellent oil tests from oil before cleaning. If I test centrifuged oil it comes back new or near new. Last time I tested centrifuged oil I got a call asking why I was testing new oil.
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Old 09-28-2021, 05:38 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Lepke View Post
I've used bypass filters since 1961. They clean the oil much better and allow longer times between changes if you test your oil. When the original toilet paper filter came out, people with gas engines were going 100,000 miles in their car before changing oil. And oil was still clear. I don't remember the interval for changing the paper, but I think 2000 miles. The cheap TP worked best. 10 rolls for a dollar, then. You can still find the Frantz filter online.

I've probably used most bypass filters made, but never Jackmaster. Looks like a big TP filter. I know fleets using Gulf Coast or similar, testing their oil, and going much longer between oil changes, I think 50,000-100,000 miles. There is a brand that uses 2 rolls of Bounty that works well, can't remember the name. It's commonly used by truckers. I know several truckers going more than a million miles before a rebuild. But if you keep up the filter changes on any bypass filter, you get less wear because the debris in the oil is much smaller. Also fuel is much cleaner with less debris. I use a 2 micron filter and haven't changed an injector in about 10 years. Some years 500+ hours on the mains.

I use a stand alone centrifuge now and never change my oil, just add as needed Detroits), and test about every 500 hours. Last oil change was 10 years ago. 2 Detroits and 2 generators, that's a lot of oil not bought. Excellent oil tests from oil before cleaning. If I test centrifuged oil it comes back new or near new. Last time I tested centrifuged oil I got a call asking why I was testing new oil.
I just did an oil analysis on my Chevy Duramax, 661 hours on the oil, through a by-pass filter head. Oil reported still good to use.
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Old 09-28-2021, 07:25 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Lepke View Post
I've used bypass filters since 1961. They clean the oil much better and allow longer times between changes if you test your oil. When the original toilet paper filter came out, people with gas engines were going 100,000 miles in their car before changing oil. And oil was still clear. I don't remember the interval for changing the paper, but I think 2000 miles. The cheap TP worked best. 10 rolls for a dollar, then. You can still find the Frantz filter online.

I've probably used most bypass filters made, but never Jackmaster. Looks like a big TP filter. I know fleets using Gulf Coast or similar, testing their oil, and going much longer between oil changes, I think 50,000-100,000 miles. There is a brand that uses 2 rolls of Bounty that works well, can't remember the name. It's commonly used by truckers. I know several truckers going more than a million miles before a rebuild. But if you keep up the filter changes on any bypass filter, you get less wear because the debris in the oil is much smaller. Also fuel is much cleaner with less debris. I use a 2 micron filter and haven't changed an injector in about 10 years. Some years 500+ hours on the mains.

I use a stand alone centrifuge now and never change my oil, just add as needed Detroits), and test about every 500 hours. Last oil change was 10 years ago. 2 Detroits and 2 generators, that's a lot of oil not bought. Excellent oil tests from oil before cleaning. If I test centrifuged oil it comes back new or near new. Last time I tested centrifuged oil I got a call asking why I was testing new oil.
Lepke,

I like would to know your opinion on the Spinner II bypass filter and what would you use instead of it (for a 12v 71n)

Thank you
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Old 09-29-2021, 04:41 AM   #12
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Balder
Is there much ash where you keep your vessel?
Hi Sunchaser,

I do not want to biaise the thread but to give you a clear answer, we take care and keep an eye 100% open with what is going on in La Palma, the very close islands where Cumbre Vieja is still very active with lava entering now in the water. We expected one month ago, book a berth in Puerto Tazacorte on the west side of La Palma but there was no space available for my 60' trawler so I decided, fortunately to go to Santa Cruz de Tenerife! Presently, winds coming from NE so no ash at the moment but this can change...
There is some debate concerning the american theory of a big tsunami which should seriously damage the east coast of US and further North, not considering destruction of Canaraias islands, coasts of >Spain Portugal and also south of UK. BBC english TV network produced a documentary about this, but many scientists answered: fake news... I hope so!
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Old 09-29-2021, 04:45 AM   #13
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Thatís a good question Jack. Iíve always learned to just follow the manufacturerís direction. Thatís all thatís needed - no need to overkill.
Yes that's true but we use our trawler on a blue water mode, most of times offshore so, as an ex sailor, I prefer have a security maximum and all back up systems ready...
As well, we keep too much diesel in our three tanks ( 8600 L) and I am afraid of starvation. Very typical of leisure powerboats or trawlers: many hours running in a short period of time when travelling from point A to point B and after, sleeping mode in a marina for some months...
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Old 09-29-2021, 04:55 AM   #14
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Thatís a good question Jack. Iíve always learned to just follow the manufacturerís direction. Thatís all thatís needed - no need to overkill.
As to oil changes, the manufacturer's recommendation does not consider whether oil analysis is being used to determine when to change oil.
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Old 09-29-2021, 05:27 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Lostsailor13 View Post
I already have installed the gulfcoast f1 fuel filter and it worked so good was thinking of adding oil bypass filter as well,anyone with one installed i have a few questions i noticed they used to make the jr model it was for a roll of toilet paper but discontinued the smaller model and now have the o1 model for engines under 250 hp,what i also found was another company that uses the gulfcoast design and is call jackmaster anyone use or heard of them
Frantz has been around for a long time.

https://www.frantzfilters.com/

I'm not sure I get the point of installing a bypass oil filter on a recreational trawler vs commercial vessel. Ratio of boats with above/below an arbitrary 5000 hours is probably 1:50, perhaps 1:100. I just don't recall a trawler owner wearing-out an engine let alone an instance due to old oil. Something else kills recreational diesels......such as a blown oil hose to an aftermarket bypass filter.

Peter
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Old 09-29-2021, 12:15 PM   #16
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Frantz has been around for a long time.

https://www.frantzfilters.com/

I'm not sure I get the point of installing a bypass oil filter on a recreational trawler vs commercial vessel. Ratio of boats with above/below an arbitrary 5000 hours is probably 1:50, perhaps 1:100. I just don't recall a trawler owner wearing-out an engine let alone an instance due to old oil. Something else kills recreational diesels......such as a blown oil hose to an aftermarket bypass filter.

Peter
My Detroit 671's require 8 gallons of oil each to change. With some top-off supply that means carrying 20 gallons of it on board to be ready for a change. It would be really nice to decrease the change interval for a number of reasons, including cost of oil and simply wasting oil that still could be used. If I was able to do a filter change and oil analysis every 100 hours, with fluid changes as directed by the analysis that would be worthwhile endeavor in my book. Using a high quality set of lines would minimize the chance of a blown oil line, my full flow filters are already on remote mounted lines.
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Old 09-29-2021, 09:54 PM   #17
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Lepke,

I like would to know your opinion on the Spinner II bypass filter and what would you use instead of it (for a 12v 71n)

Thank you
I know someone that had a spinner II and replaced it with a stand alone centrifuge. The speed of the spinner II is controlled by engine oil pressure thru a nozzle causing the spin. Higher oil pressure=higher rpm. So if you have low oil pressure like old Detroit, maybe 25#, you don't get as much cleaning as an newer engine with 80#. A hack is to use a separate oil pump that will cause a much higher centrifuge speed. The spinner II is an improvement over the stock filter, and probable cleans as well as most bypass filters. But you have to remove the top and scrape out the debris. I understand there's a model that replaces the part with the debris and newer models include a paper filter.
I think I would rather have a bypass filter and just change the filter rather than the cleaning. There are models (https://www.amsoil.com/c/bypass-oil-...ms-mounts/32/l) that are spin on filters like full flow filter. If I was going to buy a bypass filter, I'd probably buy a Amsoil, Kleenoil or Gulfcoast. They all clean down to below 5 microns. Kleenoil Bypass Oil Filter System - Bypass Oil Filtration - Home
The person that had the spinner II has a stand alone centrifuge like mine and observed more cleaning in 10 minutes than the spinner in continuous service. That's why I bought mine. I wanted clear oil. My Detroits are 1947 models and the stock filter is a bypass. (Probably why they lasted so long.) So between centrifugings the oil stays somewhat golden transparent. The stock bypass filter gets changed rarely. Thinking of adapting a newer style filter.
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Old 09-30-2021, 04:18 AM   #18
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I know someone that had a spinner II and replaced it with a stand alone centrifuge. The speed of the spinner II is controlled by engine oil pressure thru a nozzle causing the spin. Higher oil pressure=higher rpm. So if you have low oil pressure like old Detroit, maybe 25#, you don't get as much cleaning as an newer engine with 80#. A hack is to use a separate oil pump that will cause a much higher centrifuge speed. The spinner II is an improvement over the stock filter, and probable cleans as well as most bypass filters. But you have to remove the top and scrape out the debris. I understand there's a model that replaces the part with the debris and newer models include a paper filter.
I think I would rather have a bypass filter and just change the filter rather than the cleaning. There are models (https://www.amsoil.com/c/bypass-oil-...ms-mounts/32/l) that are spin on filters like full flow filter. If I was going to buy a bypass filter, I'd probably buy a Amsoil, Kleenoil or Gulfcoast. They all clean down to below 5 microns. Kleenoil Bypass Oil Filter System - Bypass Oil Filtration - Home
The person that had the spinner II has a stand alone centrifuge like mine and observed more cleaning in 10 minutes than the spinner in continuous service. That's why I bought mine. I wanted clear oil. My Detroits are 1947 models and the stock filter is a bypass. (Probably why they lasted so long.) So between centrifugings the oil stays somewhat golden transparent. The stock bypass filter gets changed rarely. Thinking of adapting a newer style filter.
Lepke,

What you said makes soo much sense.

The 12v 71N that I am thinking about buying is 1973 vintage - engine removed and toatally rebuilt 2 years ago, very few hours. It probably is in the catagory of older Detroits with the lower oil pressure. I read the spin on filters filter somewhere between 1 and 5 microns, as you mentioned "below 5 micron". What I like about the Spinner II is it claims filtering down to 1/10 of a micron. I realize that claim is probably with a lot higher oil pressure than older designed Detroits at 25#'s of oil pressure. I am thinking the hack of using a oil pump (after the full flow filter and before the Spinner II?) is an interesting solution. I wonder does the oil presure releaf valve on the full flow filter release a constant flow of oil or does it vary? Why I am concerned is would the "hack" oil pump suck open the relef valve on the full flow filter and cause it to not work as designed creating a problem?

Why I am trying to make the Spinner II work is because of the filtration to 1/10 of a micron. As far as having to clean the canister I enjoy seeing what it is taking out and to what extent it is working, I guess I am wierd as I used to cutt open all my filters on my last boat. Another issue is I like that the Spinner II does it continuiously as the engine is running. I realize the stand alone centrifuge does a superior job but using the Sinner II would save me the extra step of centrafuging the oil after the engine stops if that is when you use the stand alone centifuge. I am thinking the Spinner II would be doing a good enough job if I can get its rotation speed up.

I have learned so much from your posts I can't thank you enough and hope this is not to elimentary for you.
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Old 09-30-2021, 05:31 AM   #19
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Regardless of how good the oil filtration , I think its wise to carry 2 or 3 oil changes on board .

A busted exhaust manifold or oil cooler could fill the engine or a cylinder with water, and multiple oil changes are required .

Stuff does happen.
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Old 09-30-2021, 05:49 AM   #20
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Who among us has worn out a diesel in a recreational trawler? Assuming there is someone, how much longer would thr engine have gone if it had ultra-filtration (1/10th micron!!!)?

That said, point about reducing expense of oil changes is a good one, though I thought DDs were capable of perpetual oil changes due to frequent addition of make-up oil.
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