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Old 08-27-2017, 08:59 AM   #61
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Undoubtedly twin screws but still...
That's amazing!
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Old 08-27-2017, 10:13 AM   #62
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With the right boat and practice it can be done. I just don't have the right boat.
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Old 08-27-2017, 11:02 AM   #63
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General docking question

As others have noted, with no significant wind and current, and the right equipment, that is relatively easy. I did something similar on my recent trip.

As others have noted, you could hear a thruster in that video (I only now have the bandwidth to watch it). In my single, that maneuver is relatively easy in calm conditions. Helm hard to starboard, alternate forward and reverse thrust while in idle to walk the stern to port, use the bow thruster to keep the bow parrallel.

Much wind or current, and I'm looking for another place to dock.
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Old 08-27-2017, 12:31 PM   #64
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As others have noted, with no significant wind and current, and the right equipment, that is relatively easy. I did something similar on my recent trip.

As others have noted, you could hear a thruster in that video (I only now have the bandwidth to watch it). In my single, that maneuver is relatively easy in calm conditions. Helm hard to starboard, alternate forward and reverse thrust while in idle to walk the stern to port, use the bow thruster to keep the bow parrallel.

Much wind or current, and I'm looking for another place to dock.
Thanks Dave. Coming from a sailboat, docking and thrusters is a key question of mine. I started off reading about and viewing the larger trawlers, but at least for awhile, I値l just use it in the Chesapeake, and I知 coming to the conclusion something small and simple like a Nordic 26, NP28 or Rosborough RF-246 I can easily get in and out of a slip my myself with perhaps a dog or two for crew is a better choice.
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Old 08-27-2017, 02:09 PM   #65
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General docking question

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Thanks Dave. Coming from a sailboat, docking and thrusters is a key question of mine. I started off reading about and viewing the larger trawlers, but at least for awhile, I値l just use it in the Chesapeake, and I知 coming to the conclusion something small and simple like a Nordic 26, NP28 or Rosborough RF-246 I can easily get in and out of a slip my myself with perhaps a dog or two for crew is a better choice.

Last year when we bought our 2010 NP43, I took the helm for the sea trial. When we put it back in the water after the haul and hang part of the survey, Trevor Brice, North Pacific Yachts owner, handed the helm to me to dock. It is typically a bit windy in Everett and I was just a bit terrified. I had not yet gotten the full results of the surveys and I really didn't want to damage a boat that I didn't own yet.

The only boats I had operated until that day were sailboats up to 40'. None of them had thrusters and they all had nice big rudders. None of them had the windage that a power boat has. Despite this, I was able to put it in the slip without mishap. Trevor was standing by my shoulder just in case but let me feel my way. I have found the transition from sailboats to this boat to be relatively easy. The principles are the same even if the forces involved are a bit different.

To be honest, when docking the biggest adjustment was one I hadn't anticipated. I had spent 50 years piloting sailboats from the stern. This was the first time trying to drive a boat ahead of the pivot point. It was really odd to turn the wheel to starboard and have myself actually move to starboard instead of move to port.

In other words, you will do just fine. I'm convinced that if I can figure it out, any reasonably intelligent monkey can figure it out.
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Old 08-27-2017, 05:24 PM   #66
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Last year when we bought our 2010 NP43, I took the helm for the sea trial. When we put it back in the water after the haul and hang part of the survey, Trevor Brice, North Pacific Yachts owner, handed the helm to me to dock. It is typically a bit windy in Everett and I was just a bit terrified. I had not yet gotten the full results of the surveys and I really didn't want to damage a boat that I didn't own yet.

The only boats I had operated until that day were sailboats up to 40'. None of them had thrusters and they all had nice big rudders. None of them had the windage that a power boat has. Despite this, I was able to put it in the slip without mishap. Trevor was standing by my shoulder just in case but let me feel my way. I have found the transition from sailboats to this boat to be relatively easy. The principles are the same even if the forces involved are a bit different.

To be honest, when docking the biggest adjustment was one I hadn't anticipated. I had spent 50 years piloting sailboats from the stern. This was the first time trying to drive a boat ahead of the pivot point. It was really odd to turn the wheel to starboard and have myself actually move to starboard instead of move to port.

In other words, you will do just fine. I'm convinced that if I can figure it out, any reasonably intelligent monkey can figure it out.
Thanks for sharing this Dave. I hadn稚 considered the effect of the different steering positions. Does your NP43 have bow thrusters? I知 assuming they make a considerable difference.

The sailboats have deep, heavy keels and sails to steady them. How different is the motion of the NP43 and your sailboat?

Thanks,

Bill
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Old 08-27-2017, 11:36 PM   #67
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Thanks for sharing this Dave. I hadn稚 considered the effect of the different steering positions. Does your NP43 have bow thrusters? I知 assuming they make a considerable difference.

The sailboats have deep, heavy keels and sails to steady them. How different is the motion of the NP43 and your sailboat?

I had never thought about the difference in the steering position until I was at the helm making a hard turn to go into a slip. It was really weird and big surprise.

The motion of the NP is a lot different than my Catalina400 with its 7' fin keel and deep rudder. A powerboat IMO doesn't have as comfortable a motion in a seaway as a sailboat, particularly if compared to motorsailing with the main up.

OTOH, while we enjoy sailing very much, I would never give our pilothouse trawler for a sailboat. The advantages for us, at this stage in our life and in the waters that we cruise, are just too huge.

I spent over 12 hours driving the boat the other day. I wasn't tired out, too cold, too hot, or sore from the trip. It is pretty nice.
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Old 08-28-2017, 01:18 PM   #68
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I had never thought about the difference in the steering position until I was at the helm making a hard turn to go into a slip. It was really weird and big surprise.

The motion of the NP is a lot different than my Catalina400 with its 7' fin keel and deep rudder. A powerboat IMO doesn't have as comfortable a motion in a seaway as a sailboat, particularly if compared to motorsailing with the main up.

OTOH, while we enjoy sailing very much, I would never give our pilothouse trawler for a sailboat. The advantages for us, at this stage in our life and in the waters that we cruise, are just too huge.

I spent over 12 hours driving the boat the other day. I wasn't tired out, too cold, too hot, or sore from the trip. It is pretty nice.
The key is choosing the right boat for yourself and your uses. You did a great job on that, picked the perfect boat for you, one that you can really enjoy. Sailing is a sport, when one actually sails and doesn't motor. Power boating is a recreation. We are not sailors but love the occasional sail, especially in certain unique locations. However, way too much work for us to do at the level of usage we have. Plus some areas we cruise one would be motoring anyway. You and many others here are great examples of those who found the right boat for themselves. You're the best publicist North Pacific could ever have, just a happy customer.
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Old 08-29-2017, 09:20 PM   #69
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The key is choosing the right boat for yourself and your uses. You did a great job on that, picked the perfect boat for you, one that you can really enjoy. Sailing is a sport, when one actually sails and doesn't motor. Power boating is a recreation. We are not sailors but love the occasional sail, especially in certain unique locations. However, way too much work for us to do at the level of usage we have. Plus some areas we cruise one would be motoring anyway. You and many others here are great examples of those who found the right boat for themselves. You're the best publicist North Pacific could ever have, just a happy customer.
Well, our boat is 41 feet, length of hull, 3 ft. bowsprit, and a swim grid with dingy of at least 4 feet. So, about 48 ft. L.O.A. the distance between our slip and the one behind is less than our boat length. It is a trick getting out and back in. I work the transmission levers hard. It can be done, but with wind and tide, every once in a while there is a bit of a bump. Docking and undocking are my worst boating experiences.
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Old 08-29-2017, 10:54 PM   #70
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Well, our boat is 41 feet, length of hull, 3 ft. bowsprit, and a swim grid with dingy of at least 4 feet. So, about 48 ft. L.O.A. the distance between our slip and the one behind is less than our boat length. It is a trick getting out and back in. I work the transmission levers hard. It can be done, but with wind and tide, every once in a while there is a bit of a bump. Docking and undocking are my worst boating experiences.
Do they discourage you from boating as much as you otherwise would? I'd bet they do. Some borderline days you decide not worth it. They shouldn't be bad experiences. I'd work hard toward finding a slip that didn't make it a bad experience.
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Old 08-29-2017, 11:47 PM   #71
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Keep asking them to move you. Not nasty or combative but every few months ask if there is a better slip available. It may take a long time but if you keep at it they may take you seriously. It worked for me and for several of my friends.
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Old 08-31-2017, 09:03 PM   #72
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Keep asking them to move you. Not nasty or combative but every few months ask if there is a better slip available. It may take a long time but if you keep at it they may take you seriously. It worked for me and for several of my friends.
`We went from an individual boathouse to a shed. it was $100 cheaper a month and 500 feet closer to the parking lot. A friend of mine moved up from a Canoe Cove 41 to a Grand Banks 42, a bigger boat. He asked me to switch, as his new boat did not fit in the old stall. I kind of regret it, but too late now.
With a west wind and a flood tide, it does make docking and undocking a challenge at times. And yes, when the wind is huffing at 20 kn., I sometimes call it, and we go home.
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