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Old 01-13-2018, 06:43 AM   #21
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"no secrets to it. Padeyes, landyards, cloves hitches and half hitches."

"It takes very very little to secure furniture to walls and floors with simple hook and eyes."

While these items should be part of the new boat assembler duty ,

the brokers are selling a dream which they do not want disturbed by reality.
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Old 01-13-2018, 08:38 AM   #22
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I had planned on putting a couple of pad eyes against the wall behind our couch but haven't gotten to it yet. Our salon table is heavily weighted at the bottom. Nothing has ever moved even during hours of serious seas. The only thing I regularly do when on a passage is lay down the bar stools. Oh and if we forget to fully latch the cabinet with the pots and pans in it... well, they end up on the floor.
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Old 01-13-2018, 10:57 AM   #23
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When we had a loose Flexsteel couch/bed... it weighed a ton and most of the weight was very low... so it never moved in any seas we've been in.

We've since swapped that out for two electric recliners; weight is again low, so far no movement... but our experience with these so far is much shorter. If we anticipated especially rough seas, we might lay them over in advance...but generally a whole bunch of other loose stuff is more at risk than our furniture.

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Old 01-13-2018, 01:20 PM   #24
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When I was young and foolish, we crossed the lower chesapeake Bay during a light summer storm to the eastern shore.
On the way back from fishing, we encountered huge seas, rolling waves, wind and rain. I had to cut into these waves at 45* angle or the boat would roll into the troughs. So Landon, who was 5 was sleeping on the sofa and with every roll the sofa would slide out and when boat would roll back it would slide back into place. So here I am at the helm with my brother, and my 8 year old girl and his 9 years old son climbs out on the side deck and I saw as the boat rolls Shaun is hanging onto the top rail as he walks along the side deck with his feet dangling off over the water... They wanted to go to the bow to see the waves....

We got them back inside ok. Landon finally wakes up and keeps screaming we are all going to die...
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Old 01-13-2018, 01:41 PM   #25
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We have to lazy Boy recliners in our main cabin, love them.

We have straps that come out of some cabinets to secure each chair.

We leaned the hard way to strap down those chairs no matter how calm it is when we leave.
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Old 01-14-2018, 06:38 AM   #26
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Most frighting to me is how folks can discuss furniture being tossed about and still use fixed ranges with no fiddle rails.

Being hit by a chair is less problem than a boiling soup pot.
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Old 01-14-2018, 06:59 AM   #27
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Most frighting to me is how folks can discuss furniture being tossed about and still use fixed ranges with no fiddle rails.

Being hit by a chair is less problem than a boiling soup pot.
I think most folks without your fiddles would not choose to boil anything when there is a chance for spillage. I can recall seeing pictures of very few boats with fiddles. Unless one is going to be doing extended bluewater passages, fiddles just get in the way. For those times when it is not safe, sandwiches will fill stomachs.
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Old 01-14-2018, 07:43 AM   #28
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I think most folks without your fiddles would not choose to boil anything when there is a chance for spillage. I can recall seeing pictures of very few boats with fiddles. Unless one is going to be doing extended bluewater passages, fiddles just get in the way. For those times when it is not safe, sandwiches will fill stomachs.
My insurance company sent me a self survey for this year and one of the questions was.... does your stove have fiddles?
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Old 01-14-2018, 08:30 AM   #29
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Most frighting to me is how folks can discuss furniture being tossed about and still use fixed ranges with no fiddle rails.

Being hit by a chair is less problem than a boiling soup pot.
Our stove has a fiddle rail, but there's no way my wife will be cooking on it during serious seas - and no way she'd want to take the helm long enough in those conditions for me to.
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Old 01-14-2018, 08:33 AM   #30
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My insurance company sent me a self survey for this year and one of the questions was.... does your stove have fiddles?
Interesting, but if you answer "no", will you be denied insurance?
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Old 01-14-2018, 08:54 AM   #31
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"Our stove has a fiddle rail, but there's no way my wife will be cooking on it during serious seas"

The danger comes when dockside or anchored and a 4 ft wake rolls thru.

And its a SURPRISE!!!

Athwart ship ranges will have the pots go to port or stbd.

The hull facing units leave a 50/50 chance of a scalding .
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Old 01-14-2018, 09:41 AM   #32
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"Our stove has a fiddle rail, but there's no way my wife will be cooking on it during serious seas"

The danger comes when dockside or anchored and a 4 ft wake rolls thru.

And its a SURPRISE!!!

Athwart ship ranges will have the pots go to port or stbd.

The hull facing units leave a 50/50 chance of a scalding .
Yes, certainly a possibility dockside. But, wouldn't a wave capable of causing a full pot to slide also cause that pot to spill it's contents when it slams against the fiddle? I don't see anything more than a marginally and insignificant benefit to fiddles at dockside and most anchorages. Now, perhaps a gimballed unit with fiddles may be a more viable solution.
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Old 01-14-2018, 09:45 AM   #33
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What he said about stabilizers

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Free standing furniture is far more comfortable to use. The PO told me to always lie the salon table down before leaving the dock. I did that until I fitted stabilisers. Things hardly ever move around now.

A lot of built-in stuff is even less comfortable than an airport departure lounge and is best avoided. Of course done well it can be acceptable along one side of the salon. To enjoy being on the boat the salon should be as comfortable as your lounge at home.
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Old 01-14-2018, 10:04 AM   #34
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Anything is better than built in settees and dinettes. Unless it is a very large boat there will no room for an easy chair to sit in while docked. Have you ever tried to get comfortable sitting in a built in settee?

Feeling this way, when I ordered a brand new 48' Motor Yacht from Taiwan several years ago I expressly told them leave the salon empty of any built in furniture. When it arrived it had a screwed to the teak and holly sole a settee,a hi-lo table and a dinette. Pissed, I called the factory in Kaohsiung and asked why? The answer was that they couldn't imagine using a boat with non built ins so they didn't charge me for them.

At that time it was illegal to own a private boat in Taiwan so they had no concept of the ways a boat is used for pleasure. Their idea was that you would either be cruising or eating so you needed the built ins. Absolutely no concept that a larger amount of time is spent relaxing or watching TV as the dock.
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Old 01-14-2018, 11:12 AM   #35
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[QUOTE=seasalt007;626399]Anything is better than built in settees and dinettes. Unless it is a very large boat there will no room for an easy chair to sit in while docked. Have you ever tried to get comfortable sitting in a built in settee?"

Ours isn't so big, though with galley down there is plenty of room for twin Ekornes chairs on the port side.
In a seaway the eyes on the wall and stout bungees hold them in place.
Those chairs were our first experience with that brand. We now have a pair at home, to make our lounging at home as comfortable as on the boat.
The stb settee has backs angled for comfort.
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Old 01-14-2018, 12:47 PM   #36
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"Now, perhaps a gimballed unit with fiddles may be a more viable solution."

You must have been looking in our ports,,
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Old 01-14-2018, 01:11 PM   #37
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Our stove is gimballed with fiddles. However, it is set athwart ships so the gimbal really isnít that useful.
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Old 01-14-2018, 01:38 PM   #38
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We have a pair of Ekorne recliners. Had them in a previous boat, moved them to our RV and have now moved them into our current boat. Love them, very comfortable and not quite as large as our Lazy Boys that we have at home.
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Old 01-14-2018, 01:57 PM   #39
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I would think judicious placement of screw in eyelets and rope or strong bungeees could make a big difference here.


We have recliners and this works very well for us. Have not had any issues, and much more comfortable (IMHO) than built ins. We are costal/ Bay cruising only, so generally can avoid waves of significance with planning and watching weather
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Old 01-14-2018, 02:28 PM   #40
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Re-did our salon last year to remove built-in dinette.

In the last photo below, the (tiny) red arrow points to a flush pull-ring screwed into fiberglass underneath the sole. We used a short lanyard clipped in from under the chair base when underway.
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