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Old 05-09-2022, 06:27 AM   #21
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BinB makes a good point. What’s appropriate depends on where you are and what you do..
What’s appropriate for a long distance cruiser in the topics isn’t required in temperate regions. What’s needed for weeks on passage or remote areas is irrelevant in coastal, civilized areas.

Wonder if anyone here does high lat cruising and the food/drink concerns with that activity?
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Old 05-09-2022, 07:30 AM   #22
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Funny how cruising for a few months means different things to different people. Over the weekend my wife and I started a conversation about whether to do the Baja Ha Ha this falll. The Ha Ha is a loose knit cruisers rally from Southern California to Cabo San Lucas, about 750 nms though we'd leave from Ensenada so a 75nm headstart. There are two stops, only one of which has a town (and even that is around 20 miles from a paved road). The three legs are 280nms, 230nms, and 225nms. Like many who join the Ha Ha, it's a stake-in-the-calendar that will force us to depart. The Ha Ha is 98% sail - a few years ago a much smaller "powerboat" rally was started. "CUBAR" I believe was started out of San Diego yacht club. From my vantage, has more of an armada feel to it than the austere west coast style sailor vibe imbued by Latitude 38, the free magazine distributed throughout the west coast.

We enjoy shopping locally in Mexico. Over the years, small tiendas have given way to large American style grocery stores in many places, but not all. I recently purchased a dozen eggs from a store that sold them individually. Many stores carry Kirkland (Costco) products - toilet paper is especially welcomed as the Mexican versions of TP are not great.

For us, for remote cruising, having a good larder of staples is important. Olive oil, vinegar beyond standard white, coffee, spices, cured meats, cheese, etc. Our cooking emulates local influences but still, it's nice to have familiar ingredients. My wife really enjoys a Bloody Mary from time to time. Horseradish is impossible to find in Mexico so we stock up in the US.

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Old 05-09-2022, 07:46 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
Geez, I feel stupid.

I am on a 4,000 mile cruise and simply went to the grocery store.

Put everything onboard and cast off the dock lines.

In a couple days I'll go to another grocery store in a small town in Alaska and provision up a bit.
I'm equally stupid. Shop and go.

Our vessel has ample dry ventilated storage locations and no wet bilges or bugs. We do break down things from Costco like drinks, Raisin Bran and crackers. A dehumidifier really helps too if dock moored or motoring.
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Old 05-10-2022, 06:10 AM   #24
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Funny how cruising for a few months means different things to different people.

Useful point to emphasize, since forum members and their boats aren't really a one-size-fits-all.

Our cruising is most often a hub-and-spoke thing here on the Chesapeake, and that doesn't put much stress on our food storage plan.

And then we're not afraid to try "that restaurant over there" whenever we happen to be in an away marina... which might not be too far from more provisions anyway.

Another point might be about differing onboard facilities.

We've got decent fridge and freezer space... so we use it, in preference to cans or canning. Folks with limited cold storage would likely have to approach the issue differently.

Even we've made trips from the Chesapeake to Florida or vice versa, we've done it without emptying our freezer... with only a few top-ups along the way (e.g., more shrimp in the Carolinas). Remembering "that restaurant over there" of course.

I do like reading the various tips, here!

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Old 05-10-2022, 07:17 AM   #25
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We did the Great Loop with a 7-cubic foot chest freezer and 8.4-cubic feet of fridge space. We did nothing different on board the boat than we ever did in our dirt with never, ever having a problem, including any sort of bugs. Methinks the concern, in most respects, is the paranoia that pervades boaters' thinking about just about everything including the efficacy of drinking water from water tanks and one of my favorites, special hoses changed every two or three years for filling water tanks. Don't worry, be happy. Lookey here, I am still alive after six years of living aboard and rolling the dice every day.
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Old 05-13-2022, 12:54 PM   #26
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If you haven't already, join TheBoatGalley.com. For bug prevention, I freeze flour & pasta overnight then place in airtight containers. Another great place is the FaceBook group Cooking on boats.
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Old 05-13-2022, 01:32 PM   #27
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We tend to keep as much 'shelf stable' foods as we can. This is mostly dehydrated or raw foods (rice, pasta, hashbrown potatos, and spices) and canned foods.

For meat, everything gets portioned, vacuum packed and frozen. Frequently, if we fire up the grill, we cook as much meat as will fill the grill. We then take the cooked meat, allow it to cool, then vac-pack the cooked (chicken, steak, pork) and freeze it cooked.
This allows us to break out some cooked chicken and use it in sandwich's, omelets, stir frys, quesadillas, pasta, etc.

Perishables we buy 1-2 times a week in port when we can (onions, peppers, carrots, salad fixings, potatos, etc).
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Old 05-13-2022, 01:36 PM   #28
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If you haven't already, join TheBoatGalley.com. For bug prevention, I freeze flour & pasta overnight then place in airtight containers. Another great place is the FaceBook group Cooking on boats.
Agreed ^

For storage, things we're using are in smaller portions in sealable plastic tubs in the cabinet (flour, sugar, coffee).

The bulk of those same items are stored vac-packed in plastic tubs in our lazaret.
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Old 05-13-2022, 02:01 PM   #29
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One of the major determinants is access. Doesn’t matter if you’re anchored in a cove for weeks in Washington county Maine or a week from landfall. Same with spares and liquids.

Once you’re in the situation of

If you didn’t bring it-you ain’t got it

Your thinking changes.
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Old 05-13-2022, 03:17 PM   #30
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Be careful of soda/carbonated drinks in cans. In the Caribbean they seem to either puncture or split and you end up with a mess.
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Old 05-13-2022, 03:32 PM   #31
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Found in the tropics had no issues with carbonated cans if stored upright (tabs up) in their own ventilated locker tightly packed so they didn’t wiggle around. But agree they certainly make a mess if punctured. Grew fond of ginger beer as a mixer. But also excellent for mal de mer.
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Old 05-13-2022, 07:59 PM   #32
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This is especially a problem with Coca Cola (sorry, no experience with Pepsi etc.) “Coke” contains low levels of phosphoric acid- in an aluminum can, what could go wrong? Gradually permeates the can resulting in leakage-interestingly often results in half full cans that still retain some CO2.
We rarely drink the stuff but keep it for company. Originally, we thought it was the boat vibration chafing the cans, but noticed the same problem on shore after 6 months storage. Interesting factoid: some old time hot rodders use Coca Cola to clean their engine blocks’ coolant passages!
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Old 05-13-2022, 08:45 PM   #33
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I come from a back packing background & am very familiar with the dried, repackaged methods. But cruising east coast NA is different. You are never more than 1-2 days from a store. After several years of summer and tropical cruising, the only bugs we worry about on board are no see-ums (sand gnats) -early am & dusk. Living in SC, we know corrugated cardboard boxes, can be a vector for cockroaches, so we avoid them. Box board (cereal & cracker boxes etc.) don’t seem to be a vector since they don’t have the corrugated ridges to hide in.
On the loop, your biggest concern will be making enough ice whilst anchored or moored to a lock wall to keep your beverages really cold! Simplify, take what you usually like (& eat) then be prepared for new stuff along the way.

Finally, From one who pan fries bacon most mornings when cruising, Despite previous suggestions, I would suggest you try the “precooked” variety before stocking up. YMMV! Bacon is available universally it seems, we haven’t found a single (even tiny) store in the Bahamas that wasn’t well stocked this year or last.
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Old 05-13-2022, 08:54 PM   #34
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Finally, From one who pan fries bacon most mornings when cruising, Despite previous suggestions, I would suggest you try the “precooked” variety before stocking up. YMMV! Bacon is available universally it seems, we haven’t found a single (even tiny) store in the Bahamas that wasn’t well stocked this year or last.
If you haven't already discovered a Blackstone griddle, chances are it might be life altering for your bacon habit, especially with a bacon press (Lodge makes a nice one - I place paper towel over the frying bacon, followed by a square of tin foil then press to keep spatter down). Pancakes, eggs, home fries, fried rice, all sorts of stuff a BBQ can't do. And fairly easy to clean

https://www.walmart.com/ip/200845613

Peter
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Old 05-13-2022, 09:01 PM   #35
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The NovaKool 2 door 12 vt has a freezer that does not keep things 'hard' frozen. IF you are going on a trip for months, buy a separate 12 vt freezer and cover it with a blanket. Put the freezer where it fits, even if it is outside.
The key is to put pre-frozen items into the freezer that has reached the desired temp prior to putting anything in it.
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Old 05-13-2022, 09:30 PM   #36
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The hardest thing to keep fo a long time is regular old ice cream. The key to creamy yummy ice cream is crystal size. For some reason even in units made for dirt dwellings ice cream fairs poorly on boats. Worst with units designed for boats.
Turns out it isn’t hard to make. One possible exception is chocolate which requires a bunch of steps before freezing. And you get to make non standard flavors like cinnamon, mango, blueberry lavender and such which are quite good. It’s fun project on a rainy day at anchor.
So now make a small batch and eat after dinner once frozen.
Same with bread. Soft goods like that take up a lot of room. Baking bread makes a boat smell wonderful. Ingredients take up a vey small space.
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Old 05-13-2022, 09:45 PM   #37
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Consider using heat seal system with vacuum to seal storeables.

Better than just baggies.

Eggs: crack into ice cube tray and freeze. Once frozen, pop out and bag.
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Old 05-14-2022, 02:30 AM   #38
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OMG do you think your maybe a little OCD, I have never done any of those things while living on board and have never had a problem with bugs of any type and we have been living on board with 5 of us for years. Just live like one does on shore with very little exceptions when it comes to provisions is our rule and has worked a treat for us.
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Old 05-14-2022, 06:51 AM   #39
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Maybe a little, but again it depends on where you are cruising and how often you can get to shore. A different technique is required for a 30-day passage compared to a weekend trip. Also, bugs are an issue in some cruising areas, but not everywhere.

At home, I am at the store most every day, because it's only a mile away and I don't often plan more than a couple days in advance. That wouldn't work for most cruisers.
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Old 05-14-2022, 08:35 AM   #40
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We’re flipping to silicone baggies. Not only to not be contributing to non degradable waste but also to not having to store used ones on the boat. Turns out they work well and clean up nicely except for oily foods. Then use Tupperware like stuff.
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