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Old 07-30-2021, 05:40 PM   #21
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Poles are the best way to use any roll reducing object. The further out from the side, the more leverage is applied against the roll.
On a pole, rigged correctly, flopper stoppers can be run at any speed, and greatly reduce the swells effect.
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Old 08-01-2021, 09:38 AM   #22
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I had no luck with the orange cones (four on each side, deployed with a 10lb mushroom weight.

I bit the bullet and got a flop stopper - way better. Using it right now and for the last 2 weeks. I might get another, or rig up a way to pole it out - SoCal is rolly.

https://www.flopstopper.com/FlopStopper/Home.html
Does this unit make any clacking noises in operation?
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Old 08-01-2021, 10:24 AM   #23
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Magma Flopper Stoppers are completely silent in operation. As stated, the further outboard of the boat they are placed in the water, the bigger the leverage effect in stopping rolling at motion. Lastly, I keep mine about 6 feet below the surface of the water. Deeper=better.
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Old 08-01-2021, 07:18 PM   #24
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Does this unit make any clacking noises in operation?
No, I’ve never heard a sound from them.
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Old 08-06-2021, 01:26 PM   #25
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Use Magma

We have a set of the Magma devices and deploy w/o a pole. They do ease the roll. After 3 years the spot weld on both devices failed allowing the hinges to fall away. I was able to purchase new hinges and, instead of welding I drilled a series of holes in the hinge and “wing” affixing with ss bolts, self-locking nuts and lock tight. Been back in use for 2 years now. Based on my experience I would suggest doing this nut and bolt addition immediately only because it is easier to complete with everything still attached in place.
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Old 08-06-2021, 02:05 PM   #26
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I'm fairly happy with the Magma flopper stopper. One unit on the outrigger reduced my roll at anchor significantly. Without the outrigger the reduction is much less.

I had the same issue with the hinges as Chip. One of the spot welds on the hinges gave way so I drilled six holes and thru-bolted them. Should be good for a few more years when the rigging lines might need replacing.
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Old 08-06-2021, 04:35 PM   #27
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Thanks for the tip on bolting the hinges guys! Neither of you mentioned adding extra weight to them so I will try them without any mods for a start.
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Old 08-06-2021, 09:45 PM   #28
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Brian,
I had the Magma flopper stoppers on Tidahapah.
I added some weight by welding a 1/2" s/s bar along the lower edge in the turn out (either side) and also a 1/4 " s/s round on the outside edge.
This did improve their performance. My main complaint was trying to stop them spinning.
On new boat going for a small set of the boat stabiliser australia round ones.
Makes me wonder if a couple of appropriately sized rudder-like fins might reduce the spinning in current.
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Old 08-07-2021, 11:47 PM   #29
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Better late than never.

Hoping I'm not too late to throw in my 2 cents.

I'm probably the only guy around with outriggers & floppers on a little 28' flybridge, but I hate it when my drinks are spilled.

I've been working for years with what I'll just call flopper-stoppers (but not necessarily that brand). Have used rotating ones, flapper types, cones, buckets & now Magmas. Learned a lot along the way.

For one, always use outriggers. No shorter than half your beam & up to 1-1/2x beam, but for that you'll need a high attachment point (mast). Shoot for 45-30 degrees (from hoiz.) at the flattest for the support cables or the stress can get pretty high.

Here's the thing about the "extra weight" and drop speed. You can add weight, but it's a pain to drag around and can bang things up and.. it's just undesirable. Thing is, the drop is not as big of an issue if you don't have it flying up and down a long ways. So, ALWAYS run with them on both sides. With only one side, it damps on the way up, but the boat rocks back down too fast & it can't drop fast enough. Next upswing. the line is slack so it accelerates up and jerks on it, and it just does't work. Just use 2.

Also, regarding pole length: I found a longer poles give better leverage & damping, but increase travel up and down. This contributes to the problem of not dropping fast enough to cover that distance. A shorter pole is nice because it reduces up and down travel distance, but has less leverage to damp the rolling. But, this can be overcome with larger flopper-stoppers. That has turned out to be the winning setup for me. My Magmas are rated for (I think) something like 30'-40' vessel or something, using one. NOT. I've got 2 on 4' SS poles on an 8' beam and it's rock solid. Since they get massive traction on the way up, they hardly travel any distance (maybe a foot). So dropping isn't an issue. In conditions that would normally launch pans off the stove, it doesn't even slide a wine glass on a smooth tabletop.
Absolutely love stabilizers. Don't leave home without 'em. You just have to get them dialed in for your boat.

As for twisting, always throw a swivel on top where the lines connect to the pole.
Hope some of this might be of help. Good luck!
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Old 08-08-2021, 12:12 AM   #30
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Oh, never too late really.

My plan is for 8' poles and I have a 16' beam. I always intended to use 2. I doubt my angle will be 45°, but it should be above 30°.

Thanks for sharing your experience!
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Old 08-08-2021, 11:27 AM   #31
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Hoping I'm not too late to throw in my 2 cents.
Incredibly helpful post - thanks. Would love to see pics of your setup.

I’ve been trying to sort out how to rig up poles. Our SoCal anchorages are rolly! I don’t think I can do 1/2 beam (13.5’ beam and no mast) but thinking of a pole run off the rub rail and then a line up to the flybridge cap rail or thereabouts.
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Old 08-08-2021, 04:11 PM   #32
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Looking at those "out of stock" magmas it makes me wonder why you couldn't make your own version of the same either from s/s or 3 mm ally plate.

Would take all of an hour to cut and fold a pair in any half decent sheet metal shop
TIG or bolt on some piano hinge
Would like to think no more than a couple of hundred for the pair.

Seeing as some are contemplating using them on bigger boats than recommended, easy to scale them up in size a bit.
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Old 08-09-2021, 06:36 AM   #33
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Review of the Magma Flopper Stopper.

https://setsail.com/magma-flopper-stopper-test/

My Flopper Stoppers are identical to the yellow ones in the Dashew article (they worked well for him, but based on thr test, will replace old with the Magma plates). The yellow ones work well on my boat but unfortunately are no longer made. I've considered a similar design could be inexpensively made DIY with a heavy plastic diaphragm and industrial wire mesh or expanded metal similar to these products used for safety railings and security cages;

https://www.easternmetal.com/m/stand...wire-mesh.html

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Old 08-09-2021, 06:46 AM   #34
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Looking at those "out of stock" magmas it makes me wonder why you couldn't make your own version of the same either from s/s or 3 mm ally plate.

Would take all of an hour to cut and fold a pair in any half decent sheet metal shop
TIG or bolt on some piano hinge
Would like to think no more than a couple of hundred for the pair.

Seeing as some are contemplating using them on bigger boats than recommended, easy to scale them up in size a bit.

If you've got the tools and skills to do it, yes, you could absolutely make a set yourself (or one of the other valved plate designs). The off the shelf ones are the easy button, not so much the cheap option.
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Old 05-28-2022, 07:28 AM   #35
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My location is virtually midship, exactly the same location as my Naiad's. The latter are OK anywhere in the middle third of the boat, so they told me when installing. Yours might be better located but I think I'll be fine.
You have both naiad and flipper stoppers ? Why ? Cheers just signed contract to buy an older 44 defever in Spain with naiad , wondering if I should add something else also
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Old 05-28-2022, 08:14 AM   #36
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You have both naiad and flipper stoppers ? Why ? Cheers just signed contract to buy an older 44 defever in Spain with naiad , wondering if I should add something else also
"Flopper stoppers" is a term used for relatively lightweight outrigger poles used for stabilizing at anchor. Some regions are prone to open roadstead anchorages and can be rolly. Since Naiads are useless at anchor, you might consider flopper stoppers if your cruising grounds include rolly anchorages.

Paravanes are much beefier outrigger construction (compared to flopper stoppers) and stabilize the boat underway. The forces are much greater and consequently, the paravane structure is much heavier. Paravanes can also be used at anchor, though the "fish" used when running are usually replaced with some sort of plate with a diaphragm that allows the plate to sink easily but provides resistance on the upstroke. It would be unusual though not unheard of for a boat to have both paravanes and Naiads.

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Old 05-28-2022, 08:43 AM   #37
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Our Paravanes work pretty well to reduce roll while at anchor as well, but as Peter noted above, they aren't supposed to be as effective as the box flopper stoppers. A never used set came with the boat . . . . and they are still never used!
Underway, our paravanes ROCK! Well, actually, they REDUCE the rocking . . . . Used them yesterday crossing the Straights between US and Canada when we had beam seas.
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Old 05-28-2022, 07:22 PM   #38
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You have both naiad and flipper stoppers ? Why ? Cheers just signed contract to buy an older 44 defever in Spain with naiad , wondering if I should add something else also
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvweebles View Post
"Flopper stoppers" is a term used for relatively lightweight outrigger poles used for stabilizing at anchor. Some regions are prone to open roadstead anchorages and can be rolly. Since Naiads are useless at anchor, you might consider flopper stoppers if your cruising grounds include rolly anchorages.

Paravanes are much beefier outrigger construction (compared to flopper stoppers) and stabilize the boat underway. The forces are much greater and consequently, the paravane structure is much heavier. Paravanes can also be used at anchor, though the "fish" used when running are usually replaced with some sort of plate with a diaphragm that allows the plate to sink easily but provides resistance on the upstroke. It would be unusual though not unheard of for a boat to have both paravanes and Naiads.

Peter
Peter nailed it. My Naiads switch off (centred) below a speed of 4 kn.
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Old 05-28-2022, 07:43 PM   #39
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I should also mention that while my boat has a pair of flopper stoppers, many users only install one, not two. My hunch is you get 75%-80% of the benefit from one, the second provides some assistance.

While Seakeeper gyros can be used at-anchor, if the owner prefers to limit generator time, flopper stoppers make a lot of sense.

As I write, my flopper stoppers are being replaced. I designed a "knuckle" that attaches the inboard end to the side of the flybridge bonnet. In boat-buck terms, fairly reasonable (about $3k all-in including rigging). But has involved some time on my part. Just depends on how badly you want/need stabilization at anchor. A Defever 44 is pretty tall. I wouldn't be surprised if the inhabitants would experience quality of life issues with any roll in an anchorage.

Peter
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Old 06-28-2022, 06:09 PM   #40
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Looking at those "out of stock" magmas it makes me wonder why you couldn't make your own version of the same either from s/s or 3 mm ally plate.

Would take all of an hour to cut and fold a pair in any half decent sheet metal shop
TIG or bolt on some piano hinge
Would like to think no more than a couple of hundred for the pair.

Seeing as some are contemplating using them on bigger boats than recommended, easy to scale them up in size a bit.
Revisiting this
Stainless plate has gone up drastically in price, in fact, all metals have
Be looking at near $1000 just in material for magma style for our size

Got onto a guy in Brisbane to make our arms in Aluminium and have them now
Now waiting on the bits for in the water.
Will likely be this style done using old aluminium security screen and ally box section frame
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