Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-13-2018, 03:41 PM   #21
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 6,150
A good vacuum and a clean paint brush will go a long way on the clean up.
Granted, not as easy as CO2 and or Halon.
I suspect, the US Navy submarines are still not using CO2 or Halon for obvious reasons.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 03:46 PM   #22
Veteran Member
 
Captain Ralph's Avatar
 
City: Jax
Vessel Name: JoSea
Vessel Model: Bertram 58 MY
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
A good vacuum and a clean paint brush will go a long way on the clean up.
Granted, not as easy as CO2 and or Halon.
I suspect, the US Navy submarines are still not using CO2 or Halon for obvious reasons.
Not sure what you mean about Halon in your comment. The original design was to put a fire down to a controllable without removing O2 for humans.
What fire control do you think Subs use? Not dry chemical I assure you.
__________________

__________________
“A smooth sea never made a skillful sailor”
Captain Ralph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 03:48 PM   #23
Veteran Member
 
Captain Ralph's Avatar
 
City: Jax
Vessel Name: JoSea
Vessel Model: Bertram 58 MY
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
A good vacuum and a clean paint brush will go a long way on the clean up.
Granted, not as easy as CO2 and or Halon.
I suspect, the US Navy submarines are still not using CO2 or Halon for obvious reasons.
Have you ever cleaned up a dry chemical discharged in confined spaces? It usually requires a remote breather for the person cleaning, and a haz-mat vacuum. Asbestos has nothing on the ingredients in a dry chemical fire extinguisher.
__________________
“A smooth sea never made a skillful sailor”
Captain Ralph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 03:58 PM   #24
Guru
 
Sailor of Fortune's Avatar
 
City: St Augustine,Fl
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 3,173
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwestman View Post
if the boat is burning, who cares about the cleanup? I just want to survive.
Most shipboard fires aren't that dramatic...especially if your prepared.
__________________
Jack ...Chicken of the sea! 1600 ton Master of towing/Oceans. 1600 ton Master/Oceans.
Sailor of Fortune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 04:04 PM   #25
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 6,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Ralph View Post
Not sure what you mean about Halon in your comment. The original design was to put a fire down to a controllable without removing O2 for humans.
What fire control do you thing Subs use? Not dry chemical I assure you.
Yup back in the 60s, all portable extinguishers were dry chemical.

CO2 and Halon has a way with messing with a breathable atmosphere in the confined spaces of a submarine.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 04:21 PM   #26
Veteran Member
 
Captain Ralph's Avatar
 
City: Jax
Vessel Name: JoSea
Vessel Model: Bertram 58 MY
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
Yup back in the 60s, all portable extinguishers were dry chemical.

CO2 and Halon has a way with messing with a breathable atmosphere in the confined spaces of a submarine.
Errr, on small personal craft.
CO2 is still the main stay on large surface craft (fixed and portable) for a good reason;; It works well. Halon or later EPA Halon like gases are #2.
Dry chemical is cheap and ideal for small craft.
Oh, when your the US Navy and all else has failed, Go-zillion gallons of sea water eventually works also, unless you in a sub, then # 22 above.
__________________
“A smooth sea never made a skillful sailor”
Captain Ralph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 04:28 PM   #27
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 22,201
The original halon was breathable at the fire fighting concentration. A friend of mine researched it for use in USCG Aviation back in the early 80s.

The new stuff I can't speak for and some along the way was toxic when heated enough I think I heard in the USCG.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 04:30 PM   #28
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 6,150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Ralph View Post
Errr, on small personal craft.
CO2 is still the main stay on large surface craft (fixed and portable) for a good reason;; It works well. Halon or later EPA Halon like gases are #2.
Dry chemical is cheap and ideal for small craft.
Oh, when your the US Navy and all else has failed, Go-zillion gallons of sea water eventually works also, unless you in a sub, then # 22 above.
Something about using using Go-zillions of sea water in a submarine is VERY defeating in survivability LOL
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 04:41 PM   #29
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 22,201
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Ralph View Post
Have you ever cleaned up a dry chemical discharged in confined spaces? It usually requires a remote breather for the person cleaning, and a haz-mat vacuum. Asbestos has nothing on the ingredients in a dry chemical fire extinguisher.

https://www.quora.com/Are-fire-extinguishers-toxic

Due to Workplace Health & Safety protocols, all fire extinguisher contents must be non-toxic, however they’re not entirely safe either. The chemicals used are considered appropriate for home use, but you should take precautions to avoid touching or inhaling too much of the powder. Since the vast majority of fire extinguishers contain ammonium phosphate and/or ammonium sulphate, you need to be careful about cleaning up. The chemicals can irritate skin, so use gloves and avoid inhaling by using a dust mask. You should be able to simply sweep or vacuum the residue up and then don’t forget to get a fire extinguisher inspection, recharge, or buy a new one. If you have more questions, I would recommend contacting Fire Extinguishers-Fire Safety Equipment-Fire Extinguisher Suppliers
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 04:50 PM   #30
Veteran Member
 
Captain Ralph's Avatar
 
City: Jax
Vessel Name: JoSea
Vessel Model: Bertram 58 MY
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
The chemicals used are considered appropriate for home use
How many fuel fires, electrical fires, fiberglass or dense wood fires do you try to control at home??
On a boat, you can not just walk away.
As on post #19 above, your fighting for your life. When you win, it has to be cleaned up. Not a house use douse either.

Guys, I'm not talking high tech here,,load up on the best fire equipment you can. Read and learn when and how to use it. It's a small expense that could save your boat and your life. We push a 58' mostly off shore and understand, calling 911 is not going to put a fire truck on us in a few minutes.. On a plastic boat, a few minutes is all you have to get any fire down. We can't just walk away. You have to fight and put any fire down.

We have Halon, CO2 and dry chemical available to every cabin and area.

When I started comments on this thread, it was sounding like penny
pinchers.

Keep current and many fire fighting products on board, not the minimum stated by some meathead in DC.
__________________
“A smooth sea never made a skillful sailor”
Captain Ralph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 06:20 PM   #31
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 22,201
Just relaying info on normal dry chem extinguishers and their toxicity....

Not posting a fire fighting plan......just fire extinguishers dont put out fires, knowing how to use them does.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 07:54 PM   #32
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 11,453
Here it seems is a major problem with fire fighting chemical foam:
Defence admits three-year delay in warning people about toxic foam danger - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Note that the publicly funded Australian Broadcasting Commission loathes and constantly attacks the Govt. which funds it. This may affect the quality and accuracy of the report.
__________________
BruceK
2005 Integrity 386 "Sojourn"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 08:22 PM   #33
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 4,019
Wow looks like I found another anchor like subject with my question

L
Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 08:25 PM   #34
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: penultimate Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 12,033
Extinguishers are inexpensive. I prefer those that won't leave a mess if used. Fortunately, have had no need for one.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 09:28 PM   #35
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 11,453
Powder in the powder type can solidify unless regularly agitated by shaking. I doubt boat motion is enough,unless the boat is really getting hammered.
__________________
BruceK
2005 Integrity 386 "Sojourn"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 09:34 PM   #36
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 6,150
I doubt if many of us have had the need for a fire extinguisher nor a rescue raft.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 09:48 PM   #37
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,656
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
I doubt if many of us have had the need for a fire extinguisher nor a rescue raft.


Not sure what you mean. I need fire extinguishers partly because they are a USCG requirement. I also need them as necessary safety equipment, much like a PFD. I’ve never fallen overboard, but I still think I need PFDs.

FWIW, I did respond to a Mayday call for a boat on fire. I was in my sailboat at the time. By the time we were able to arrive on site the captain felt that he was getting the fire under control. We, along with another sailboat, stayed there to offer any assistance (take them off the boat or give them additional fire extinguishers) if necessary. A USCG helicopter arrived shortly after we did and about 30 minutes later a fireboat arrived followed by Vessel Assist.

The point is that fires do occasionally happen.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2018, 10:33 PM   #38
Opu
Senior Member
 
City: Oceanside
Vessel Name: Cheers
Vessel Model: Bayliner 32
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 104
Dry chemical cleanup

In the early 2000’s I was racing my Catalina 27 around San Clemente Island. As we were nearing the island I went off watch and went to the head. The boat lurched while I was getting my pants down and I lurched with it and bumped the extinguisher in the (small) head compartment. There was a hissing noise and the compartment filled with powder. I thought I had knocked the safety out and hit the valve handle, but I could feel that the safety was in place. I pulled the bottle out of the rack, carried it through the cabin and put it in the cockpit (still hissing).

Next morning one of my crew guys found the pressure gauge on the floor of the head compartment. I had knocked it off when I lurched.

I cleaned up the best I could but there were still traces of the powder when i donated the boat 12 years later.
__________________
Dick
M/V Cheers
Oceanside
Opu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2018, 12:46 AM   #39
Senior Member
 
wwestman's Avatar
 
City: Bellingham, WA
Vessel Name: Excellent Adventure
Vessel Model: 1995 Jefferson Ker Shine 45
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 395
I have witnessed more boat fires over the years than I can count. All of them burned for some time (they ALL went out when the boats sank). The one thing in common in each case was how fast the fire got out of control. Based on what I have seen you have less than one minute to stop the fire on a boat. May by two if you are lucky. So you had better be ready to take very aggressive action to get the fire out or be ready to get in the water. I have seen multi million dollar mega yachts with fire suppression systems burn to the water line because a kitchen fire got out of hand. It is scary how little time it takes fiberglass to light up.

I have extinguishers all over my boat , my goal is to (if I can't put it out) slow it down long enough to put out a mayday, get PFDs and start swimming.
wwestman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2018, 01:08 AM   #40
Guru
 
ssobol's Avatar
 
City: Leesburg, VA
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 971
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
The original halon was breathable at the fire fighting concentration. A friend of mine researched it for use in USCG Aviation back in the early 80s.

The new stuff I can't speak for and some along the way was toxic when heated enough I think I heard in the USCG.
If the system is correctly sized for the installation. At high enough concentrations halon will start to be hazardous to humans. The fire fighting concentration is about 5%. Between 7 and 10% effects may start to be apparent in susceptible people. I once worked at place where the system could cause an unacceptable level (too high). If the halon was discharged we were to enter the space and get anyone who was overcome out of the area.

On the other hand, once we came in on a Monday and noticed that we had a trouble alarm on one of the systems. After some troubleshooting it was determined that sometime over the weekend the system had discharged for no apparent reason (there was no fire). Other than the trouble alarm and zero pressure readings on the tanks, there was no visible evidence in the space that the system had fired off.
__________________

ssobol is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×