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Old 05-12-2019, 10:42 AM   #81
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Yes Jay

OPPS ....
230 degrees!

Edited the mistake.
Thanks Jay!
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Old 05-12-2019, 12:15 PM   #82
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Originally Posted by Steve DAntonio View Post
That's the preferred location for an oil temp sensor, as rare as they are.

Unless I'm mistaken, some Cummins models are among the few that have an oil temp thermostat for the cooler, so your results don't surprise me. Perhaps Ski can comment.
I don't think there is an oil temp thermostat in the Cummins, but could be wrong. I know a good bit about these engines, but have not been deep into that system.

What I do know is this: The oil cooler is at the discharge of the circ water pump. At light load and during warm up with coolant tstat closed (or just cracked slightly open) the coolant circulates through the engine (and oil cooler) and this actually warms the oil. While in this light load mode, the coolant into the oil cooler is about the same temp as the coolant leaving the cyl head. A few degrees of delta, not much more.

At higher loads, most of the coolant entering the circ pump is from the coolant HX so the coolant temp going into the oil cooler is now a good bit cooler than during light load running. And at high load the piston cooling nozzles put a good bit of heat into the oil, so the added cooling is a benefit.

A nice self-regulating system, really. No need for a thermostat
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Old 05-13-2019, 07:10 AM   #83
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Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
I don't think there is an oil temp thermostat in the Cummins, but could be wrong. I know a good bit about these engines, but have not been deep into that system.

What I do know is this: The oil cooler is at the discharge of the circ water pump. At light load and during warm up with coolant tstat closed (or just cracked slightly open) the coolant circulates through the engine (and oil cooler) and this actually warms the oil. While in this light load mode, the coolant into the oil cooler is about the same temp as the coolant leaving the cyl head. A few degrees of delta, not much more.

At higher loads, most of the coolant entering the circ pump is from the coolant HX so the coolant temp going into the oil cooler is now a good bit cooler than during light load running. And at high load the piston cooling nozzles put a good bit of heat into the oil, so the added cooling is a benefit.

A nice self-regulating system, really. No need for a thermostat
Thanks for the detailed description of how this system works, I was unfamiliar with that routing.

While I have not held one in my hand, a Cummins rep told me at some point that some Cummins engines have oil coolers, but I could not tell you which models. A quick Google search yielded this Cummins part https://highwayandheavyparts.com/i-2...RoCHfwQAvD_BwE Says it's 215F, which sounds right.

Perhaps it's a result of the routing you described, or an oil cooler t-stat, but I find Cummins engines tend to not exhibit unusually low oil temp once warmed up, usually above 180F.
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Old 05-13-2019, 07:40 AM   #84
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Thereís a new coolant out now that has a really high boiling point.
May be a good coolant for Old FLís w a plugged up water jacket aft.
They say you donít need to worry about boiling. I guess it just dosnít boil at any thinkable temperature. I would be tempted to run it w a 230 (or so) degree thermostat .. if available. Never heard of such a thermostat. Should/may eliminate the underloading issue by keeping the lube oil quite warm. May be good for all or most engines. Should burn less fuel.

Also may not be able to do this w/o running higher system pressures that may/would require special hoses that could deal w the higher pressures and temps. Blow head gaskets???

Steve .... comment?
Norm:

I believe you are referring to "waterless" coolant. If so this is the most popular brand https://www.evanscoolant.com/ I own a classic car and if you want to ignite an online firestorm mention this in one of those forums, it's controversial to say the least. I don't use it.

If your cooling system is in good condition, and you replace the coolant every two years (or at the very least have it analyzed), the elevated boiling point established by conventional coolant, and a pressurized cooling system (that pressure raises the boiling point three degrees for every pound of pressure, as well as decreasing cavitation erosion) provide all the cooling and corrosion and boil protection you need. Some engine manufacturers recommend the periodic addition of a coolant supplement that further decreases cavitation (my International 7.3l Ford diesel calls for this) erosion, particularity for wet liner engines. Part of your cooling system service should include regular inspections of the pressure cap, remove it when cold and inspect the rubber gaskets, there should be two for systems that use a recovery bottle, as well as the check valve. More on that subject in this photo essay https://stevedmarineconsulting.com/p...ssay-may-2015/

On the subject of cooling systems, here's a brief column on he subject of coolant recovery bottles, how they work and their importance as a troubleshooting tool https://stevedmarineconsulting.com/t...overy-bottles/

Where coolant is concerned, I strongly recommend using the latest recommendation from the engine manufacturer. Today there are a wide range of coolant types, using the wrong one can create costly issues.
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Old 05-13-2019, 09:26 AM   #85
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Thanks Steve,
I’m not that high tech. My “tech” for coolant is to use orange newer stuff for engine systems that have aluminum that comes in contact w the coolant and old school green for all else. My trawler has green.

I posted the “waterless” info mostly for higher up gearheads than me here on TF but all this kind of mechanical “lore” is usually very interesting to me. In the old days I had a big old Buick with a carb and thought to modify the cooling system eliminating all the hoses and sub pipe to create a system that would run at 250+ degrees. Re-jet the carb (lean) and get Toyota mileage w a Buick V8. Had another Buick 350 that ran on propane.
Many elements of a super hot cooling system like gaskets and things running hotter than designed for may cause problems. Could be unsafe as well. How much heat and pressure will a heater core take .. or a trans oil cooler ect? Just thoughts.
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