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Old 02-05-2018, 06:43 PM   #21
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I agree with the above post - a dinghy is not a life raft.


Life rafts are designed to stay oriented and protect you in rough seas without propulsion.


We have a nice dinghy - but I would hate to think about being in it without power. In this situation, how long can I keep the motor running with the gas on board. Even with power - I cant imagine 6 ft seas on it.


Dinghy is secured to the swim platform. Would take several minutes with me being on the swim platform to separate it from the boat. Imagine the boat being with out power, turned by the seas so it is rolling with beam on waves - how would I even be able to stay on the swim platform to get the dinghy undone.


I think another factor is the area in which you typically boat. The further north you are, the colder the water. It would be one thing if you are off the coast of South Florida versus off the coast of Maine.


We do not currently have a life raft - but it is on the list.


Mark
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Old 02-05-2018, 06:57 PM   #22
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true a dingy is not a liferaft...

no more than most of our boats are bluewater cruisers.

For most of us, 99 percent of most of our cruising is fair weather, warmer weather....and withinn quick reach of rescue resources..

If you cruise the Inside Passage to Alaska or the beyonds of Maine or well past Puerto Rico...your survival skills and plan need to be notched up.

But for most of us, if we need to abandon ship, as long as we havent ventured into the eye of a storm and have an EPIRB or PLB, a dingy will suffice till rescue...the same concept of a survival coastal platform versus a full blown world traveller life raft. This is assuming launching the dingy is easy enough....and the reason mine can be in seconds.

Think this through before throwing money at the wrong end of survival.
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Old 02-05-2018, 07:50 PM   #23
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Traveled from Cape May NJ to NYC and the Wx went south...... just my Capt and me. After that trip, I decided to purchase a canister life raft (6 person) mounted on the fly bridge. If buying a LF, do your homework - a 2 or 4 person can get real small and might not have an adequate "ladder" to get from the water to the LR.
Also, our ditch bag with handheld VHF, EPRIB, etc is always at the saloon door when traveling.
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Old 02-05-2018, 08:16 PM   #24
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sometimes buying education in picking weather windows may be better money spent than on a liferaft that does not guarantee survival by any means.

not trying to be harsh but after 28 years of maritime rescue and many more seeing average boaters sold a bill of goods.... survival is not as cut and dry as most mag and internet articles would have you believe. NEVER solely take info from a seller of liferafts, like at a boatshow as gospel.
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Old 02-06-2018, 12:02 AM   #25
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sometimes buying education in picking weather windows may be better money spent than on a liferaft that does not guarantee survival by any means.

not trying to be harsh but after 28 years of maritime rescue and many more seeing average boaters sold a bill of goods.... survival is not as cut and dry as most mag and internet articles would have you believe. NEVER solely take info from a seller of liferafts, like at a boatshow as gospel.
There is a lot of wisdom in that statement.
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:30 AM   #26
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"Perhaps a survival suit would be a compromise that increases your odds of survival if the boat does go down, but doesn't take up as much space as a liferaft ?

And does not require expensive periodic inspections .

Our choice for offshore was to increase the flotation (fenders lashed under seats) on our 9 ft Grumman sailing dink ,compass ,signal mirror , survival suits ,an EPRB and real flairs..

Sailing in 100+ miles might not be fun , just very uncomfortable.
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Old 02-07-2018, 10:56 AM   #27
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Hi

Good life rafts can be rescue, but cheap life rafts are a curse.

A good life rafts has a blown big entrance level that makes it easier to get up. I have been training with the high waves Ascent of different types of life rafts and some of them were almost useless, unless you have a big hand muscles. In poor life rafts are just underneath the mouth of the fabric made of the level!

Watch the video and mouth hole on the underside, this is a great life rafts

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Old 02-07-2018, 11:33 AM   #28
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yes..... but survival coastal platforms have their place.... for those that dont need 180 day lasting offshore rafts that survive hurricanes.

For 90 percent of tbe rescues I have done on tbe East US Coast, an inflated kiddie pool would have been fine....or a decent dingy, or gumby suits, or anything that would keep you afloat and warm enough for 24 hours in mild to choppy conditions.
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Old 02-07-2018, 12:18 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
true a dingy is not a liferaft...

no more than most of our boats are bluewater cruisers.

For most of us, 99 percent of most of our cruising is fair weather, warmer weather....and withinn quick reach of rescue resources..

If you cruise the Inside Passage to Alaska or the beyonds of Maine or well past Puerto Rico...your survival skills and plan need to be notched up.
Well since I cruise in the "beyonds of Maine" I have to say that your are almost never out of sight of a lobster boat and a VHF call for help will bring one within 5 minutes 99+% of the time. Lobster boats do thin out after about 4 PM, and on Sunday, but any other time of day they are there. No where in Maine is really "out there". Also no one boats at night in Maine unless they have a cage around their props. Your chance of fouling your running gear on lobster gear is very close to 100% if you run for more than a mile at night.
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Old 02-07-2018, 06:48 PM   #30
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8ut water temperatures in Maine steer survival options a huge amount.

Survival plans are like buying insurance...what are your risks vesus what will it take to mitigate them to acceptable levels.

As far as being out there, I have seem serious injuries in populated areas take nearly an hour to coordinate rescue....once away from a dock anywhere...you are in the wilds.

So survival education, plans, and execution on any boat can be a huge difference in survival.
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:01 PM   #31
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I would recommend attending a safety at sea course. We did pool work with rafts, suits, etc. In a controlled environment, no wind, perfectly healthy( no injuries, fatigue or sea sickness) daytime pool, things were almost impossible. The first time I almost drowned was trying to get into a life raft. Trying to flip a large raft is impossible. You carry so mich water in foul weather gear... Having a raft for 8 with a crew of two is a bad idea.

I kinda agree w/ psneeld. But to each his own
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:32 PM   #32
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Weather conditions are everything, whether at sea, the Arctic, mountains, desert, etc.

Get caught in extreme conditions and your chances for survival slip immeasuably.

Stay in benign conditions, and you have done you and rescuers a big favor.
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:53 PM   #33
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I am a bit surprised to see that the most important emergency gear has been ignore, the one you cannot miss if you want to survive, well in fact there are 3:

First:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...utch_beers.jpg

Second ( not less then 12 )
https://lescotesdeprovence.fr/images...maines-ott.jpg

Third but not the least to keep warm
https://img.thewhiskyexchange.com/900/lgvob.2000.jpg

L
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Old 02-08-2018, 01:10 AM   #34
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I would recommend attending a safety at sea course. We did pool work with rafts, suits, etc. In a controlled environment, no wind, perfectly healthy( no injuries, fatigue or sea sickness) daytime pool, things were almost impossible. The first time I almost drowned was trying to get into a life raft. Trying to flip a large raft is impossible. You carry so mich water in foul weather gear... Having a raft for 8 with a crew of two is a bad idea.

I kinda agree w/ psneeld. But to each his own
Hi,

Taking into account if still normal clothing that gets wet when wet and makes it difficult to move and if you are heavier than normal and you are not a force man, you have access to liftrafts really difficult and cheap on the ferry almost impossible even if you do not wave because the level of climb is bad.

Everyone should go for this kind of course where to test. We also have a huge swimming pool where you get a big wave, hard wind, rain, darkness almost hellish conditions to try



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Old 02-08-2018, 01:19 PM   #35
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Interesting post. One question and or comment has not been stated.


Your ditch equipment will in some cases be dictated by where you cruise. Like Psneeld stated on the east south coast a PFD may be acceptable.


For ASD, we cruise in the PNW where the water is around 52f. So I spent some quiet time in the cockpit going through an abandon ship scenario. It was sobering moment.


Although our RIB is not a life raft, if there is time it would be put in the water. We both have cold water emersion suits (Gumby). Attached to the suits is a whistle, mirror, water proof VHF handheld and PLB.


Why a PLB and not an EPIB? An EPIRB marks the spot the ship went down, not necessarily YOUR position. If the Admiral and I get separated, they can still track us separately. PLBs mark MY position, not that of the boat.


We also have a ditch bag, mounted right behind the helm chair. It has flares, first aid, fire starter, ink packs, water tablets, fishing stuff, VHF radio, compass, plastic bags, knife and other small items.


Point being your ditch bag may contain different items based on where you boat.
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Old 02-09-2018, 06:30 AM   #36
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"Point being your ditch bag may contain different items based on where you boat."

Bases on where in the world you boat , if you cant self rescue you will probably DIE.
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Old 02-09-2018, 07:00 AM   #37
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Interesting post. One question and or comment has not been stated.


Your ditch equipment will in some cases be dictated by where you cruise. Like Psneeld stated on the east south coast a PFD may be acceptable.


For ASD, we cruise in the PNW where the water is around 52f. So I spent some quiet time in the cockpit going through an abandon ship scenario. It was sobering moment.


Although our RIB is not a life raft, if there is time it would be put in the water. We both have cold water emersion suits (Gumby). Attached to the suits is a whistle, mirror, water proof VHF handheld and PLB.


Why a PLB and not an EPIB? An EPIRB marks the spot the ship went down, not necessarily YOUR position. If the Admiral and I get separated, they can still track us separately. PLBs mark MY position, not that of the boat.


We also have a ditch bag, mounted right behind the helm chair. It has flares, first aid, fire starter, ink packs, water tablets, fishing stuff, VHF radio, compass, plastic bags, knife and other small items.


Point being your ditch bag may contain different items based on where you boat.
A PLB and EPIRB function exactly the same in terms of broadcasting. It is just a matter of when activated and what they are tied on to.
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Old 02-09-2018, 11:16 AM   #38
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i agree with all the above.

Id spend money on a PLB and a Garmin InReach.
In case of emergency, if out of VHF contact, it's nice to be able to at least text with yur situation. Cost is minimal.
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Old 02-09-2018, 12:03 PM   #39
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A PLB and EPIRB function exactly the same in terms of broadcasting. It is just a matter of when activated and what they are tied on to.
Oh I agree. But I have the PLBs attached to each our Gumby suits....EPIRS are not normally attached?
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Old 02-09-2018, 12:31 PM   #40
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On PLB vs. EPIRB, it might be worth noting that most EPIRBs when activated operate for 48 hours while most PLB's work for 24 hours. Might make a difference if you're far from help.
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