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Old 01-15-2018, 11:40 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
While I don't ever hook to city water for the previously mentioned reason, if you choose to, you can incorporate a flow restricter before the connection to the boat. Simply, it reduces the hose diameter from 1/2" or greater down to a much smaller size. There's nothing to fail as it's only a hole through a pipe fitting. The same thing can be accomplished by plumbing a gate valve after the dock hose. Once you have it adjusted to the minimum required flow, just remove the hand wheel. The idea is to limit the flow to about 3 gallons per minute.

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YES, and many who read your post may not have an understanding of why failures occur in a boat’s interior plumbing system. Most are related to excessive pressure and if your suggestion is followed by someone whose boat lacks a pressure reducer it can be an invitation to trouble. I find it to be poor advise to offer flow restricting suggestions to others while you yourself refrain from directly connecting to city water.

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What part of the last sentence in my post do you not understand?

Simply, when your boat plumbing fails, this limits the flooding to 3 gallons per minute. Not sure how you see that post as in anyway endorsing the use of city water pressure. This was in response to post #4, offering another alternative to lowering your risk should the boat plumbing fail.

Ted
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Old 01-16-2018, 06:44 AM   #22
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For about $10. most hardware stores have an inline device , made for washing machines that will stop the flow once past a certain point.

This is in case a hose blows with the owner absent.
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Old 01-16-2018, 10:18 AM   #23
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It's difficult to sink a house but not difficult to sink a boat.

The foolproof way of not sinking a boat from city water is to not hook the boat to city water. Fill the tanks and use water from the tanks. Anything else is taking a risk. Your risk tolerance is up to you but remember, even if you have never seen a boat sink from being connected to the city water system, it can and has happened.

What worries me about these shutoff devices is, they are often made of plastic and not built to the reliability that I would want to protect my boat. I would feel better about one made to commercial or industrial standards.

I use the water from my tanks and it's never been a problem. And as someone pointed out, it keeps the tanks fresh.
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Old 01-16-2018, 11:40 AM   #24
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If you're going to hook up dockside water, here's a pressure regulator with no moving parts to fail...and it's inexpensive. I don't do it often, but when I do, I use this.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Camco-Bra...&wl13=&veh=sem

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Old 01-16-2018, 12:41 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
What part of the last sentence in my post do you not understand?

Simply, when your boat plumbing fails, this limits the flooding to 3 gallons per minute. Not sure how you see that post as in anyway endorsing the use of city water pressure. This was in response to post #4, offering another alternative to lowering your risk should the boat plumbing fail.

Ted
Yeah, so you limit the flow and hope your bilge pumps function as advertised. I stand by by earlier comments. If your going to use dock water, make sure you have a pressure reducer where water enters the boat. Can you understand that?
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Old 01-16-2018, 12:56 PM   #26
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Hey Gordon, good, yet a simple question. Good advice from those above, such as turning the water off when leaving the boat and carring a pressure regulator. I also have a coal activated filter from the shore hose to the pressure regulator. Below is a link of the regulator I use. Got it from Camping World. It is adjustable.


Word of additional advice. NO NOT use a shore water hose that is on the dock. Use your hose! You have no way of learning where that hose has been. I saw tour boats in Juneau use the hose down in the head to unclog it.....yep, will not be using that hose.


Adjustable Water Regulator - Lead Free - Valterra A01-1117VP - Faucets & Inlets - Camping World
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Old 01-16-2018, 01:12 PM   #27
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When I hear of a problem on a “friend’s boat” or a “guy I knew’s ” boat, I get suspicious. I much more trust firsthand experience. I have spent my life and my career building and working on boats. Ran boatyards and marinas for over 20 years. I have seen several boats sink on moorings or in their slips. I never yet saw a boat sink from a fresh water hose failure. I never saw a boat in the water sink if all the seacocks were closed either. (I have seen several boats sink on land). We have lived on this boat 9 years. We spent 5 winters in the ice and snow of Maryland and VA. We now cruise full time. We now winter in FL. Anytime we stop at a marina we are usually there to fill our water tank, so we hook up to the dock water. When we stop at a marina somewhere for a while, we connect to city water every time and only turn it off if we are going to be away from the boat overnight.
But just to check, I have taken the dock hose and run it directly into the bilge at full volume. The bilge pump is a rule 1500. It must raise the water 5 feet and run through 11 feet of hose to go overboard. The pump system is more than capable of managing that flow. (And yes there is a backup 2000 gph secondary pump higher up.) I next turned on the water system and open a hose in the engine room to pump all the tank water into the bilge too and the 1500 could keep up with the flow from both sources. This makes me wonder how a boat can fill with water almost to the point of sinking, in only an hour? Must be a high-volume hose and the bilge pump must not be working. Not saying it didn’t happen but it would require a water flow 15,000 GPH or 25 gallons per minute over and above the bilge pump capacity to half sink a 12,000 pound, 34’ boat, one foot deeper into the water in an hour. And I do not know many dock hoses that can deliver that volume.
Just like singe vs twin, propane vs electric and what is the best anchor, we will not solve this issue to everyone’s satisfaction. Having tested our bilge pumps we have arrived at a solution which works for us. Permanent connection only turned off when we are away overnight.

Does anyone have a source for a flow based shut off with can turn off after x gallons? I have only been able to find timers which turn the water of after x minutes.
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Old 01-16-2018, 01:14 PM   #28
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To echo Alaska Sea-Duction. Do not ever fill your tank from the spigot at the pump out station. You know where that hose has been!
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Old 01-16-2018, 01:17 PM   #29
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If you are going to be connected to the shore water, as others have said, be sure to have a pressure regulator. The Jabsco hull inlets do have this feature built in.

Marine Water Pressure Regulators
https://www.defender.com/category.jsp?id=2234266
Jabsco Water Pressure Regulator Item # : 502603; Type: In-Line, Color: White; Limits Inlet Water Pressure to 45 PSI; Inlet: GHT Fitting, Outlet: 1/2" NPT Male; Model Number: 44411-0045, Designed for day and night protection of the entire plumbing system from unregulated city water system hook-ups. Whether connected to ..
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Old 01-16-2018, 01:21 PM   #30
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If you are going to be connected to the shore water, as others have said, be sure to have a pressure regulator. The Jabsco hull inlets do have this feature built in.

Marine Water Pressure Regulators
https://www.defender.com/category.jsp?id=2234266
Jabsco Water Pressure Regulator Item # : 502603; Type: In-Line, Color: White; Limits Inlet Water Pressure to 45 PSI; Inlet: GHT Fitting, Outlet: 1/2" NPT Male; Model Number: 44411-0045, Designed for day and night protection of the entire plumbing system from unregulated city water system hook-ups. Whether connected to ..
I had one of those and changed it out for a non-regulator type. My boat has all 3/4 inch copper plumbing. 45psi just doesn't do it for me in the shower. I like 55-60psi, so I adjust the pressure for that.
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Old 01-16-2018, 01:37 PM   #31
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Sure a city water supplied hose can sink your boat.

So can a bunch of other things.

I know of more dripless packing sysyem failures that have almost sunk boats more than city water...yet we have plenty here that trust those implicitly.

There are so many opinions posted about the dangers in boating by those that really arent all that experienced it has to be bewildering to new boaters.

Many of these posts are by boaters that have never worked in a marine field and they have never lived aboard and have been fully immersed. Yet they read a few things and have talked up boating some between cutting the grass and painting house trim and taken their annual ski trips.....and thus they still believe they have the answer.

Sure there are highly experienced guys like Ted here that choose not to do things like use city water inlets in his risk tolerance...but there are those of us that use city water with risk mitigation that have no and know of no problems. Both arent about to sink any time soon.

Its only up to you whether you accept any risk tolerance at all or realize the slight risk if you know what you are doing. But please dont listen to magazine/forum reading part timers that are going on fears and not realistic probabilities.
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Old 01-16-2018, 02:28 PM   #32
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The only true pressure reducers I would trust using dock pressue is one like this. I would also add a pressure gage on the discharge so you can adjust a pressure safe for your water system. Using dock pressure I guess is for boats with small water tanks needing refilling every few days, or those lucky enough to have w/d aboard.
These pressure reducers are sold in the big box stores for about $80 plus hose fittings and pressure gage.
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Old 01-16-2018, 02:41 PM   #33
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[QUOTE=HiDHo;627161]The only true pressure reducers I would trust using dock pressue is one like this.

That looks like a great valve, however there are thousands upon thousands of boats using the Jabsco system. I've not heard of any problem with it.
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Old 01-16-2018, 03:03 PM   #34
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They claim they can reduce up to 125 psi to 45 psi but I witnessed a new one burst using 110 psi dock pressure. The retailer did replaced the Jabsco but the second one blew also. Could have been a bad batch of plastic ? The good news is when the Jabsco blew it looked like the reducer valve closed down and the hose and the valve assemble blew away from the bulkhead fitting with no flooding of the boat. I guess they are good at lower dock water pressures. I removed ours and only use our 300 gallon water tank and pump, we are full time live a-boards and if we had a w/d I would probable plumb in a diaphram type pressure reducer if water usage required it.
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Old 01-16-2018, 03:41 PM   #35
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Yeah, so you limit the flow and hope your bilge pumps function as advertised. I stand by by earlier comments. If your going to use dock water, make sure you have a pressure reducer where water enters the boat. Can you understand that?
Once again the great misunderstanding. Wasn't advocating using a flow restricter instead of a regulator, but with a regulator. The preceding posts were about regulators failing and having a way of limiting boat flooding. Why don't you try reading the first 8 posts, see the common theme of regulators and plumbing failing, and suggestions offered to reduce the risk of the boat sinking.

Then find the spot where I recommend not using a regulator or using a flow restricter in place of a regulator.

Ted
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Old 01-16-2018, 09:31 PM   #36
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If you're going to hook up dockside water, here's a pressure regulator with no moving parts to fail...and it's inexpensive. I don't do it often, but when I do, I use this.
I think I would prefer going with this one:
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Camco-400...&wl13=&veh=sem

It has a gauge, and is adjustable. I know my last boat pressure system was 30 psi, not 50.

Also, a simple flow restrictor can be a fender washer placed under the hose washer in the female end of the garden hose.
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Old 01-16-2018, 09:48 PM   #37
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I don't know about any of the other regulators but the Jabsco unit mentioned as a safety feature fails to zero pressure rather than unlimited pressure.
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Old 01-16-2018, 09:57 PM   #38
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I don't know about any of the other regulators but the Jabsco unit mentioned as a safety feature fails to zero pressure rather than unlimited pressure.
I broke 2 jabsco pressure regulator in 2 seasons of 6 month, they are rubbish.
What broke was not the regulation system itself but the fitting connected to the hose itself. It is a piece of plastic only fitted by force in its housing. If by any mean you have the water pressurized and you hit it or manipulate it chance it will break and pop out. At 60CAD never ever again for me.

L
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Old 01-16-2018, 09:59 PM   #39
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For those of you that want to bump the pressure up when you take a shower there is this.


https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B06XKL6WR9/...detail_1?psc=1


Just remember to turn it back down when you are finished.
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Old 01-16-2018, 10:15 PM   #40
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There are two types of shore water connections--those that keep the tank topped off and those that are connected to the plumbing AFTER the water pump. Most shore water pressure is too high for marine (and also RV) fresh water plumbing...it can blow a connection off. So you'll need a pressure reducer valve. Get some knowledgeable advice about where and how to install it before just plugging the water hose into the boat. Just be aware that there are only two kinds of pressure reducer valves--those that have failed and those that will. So NEVER leave the water on when away from the boat, even for an hour or two and never go to bed with it on. A sailboat owner I knew just went for a Sunday morning run with his dog...came back to a foot of water in his cabin. Another hour would have sunk his boat in its slip. And I've known more than one person who had to get up in the middle of the night and stepped out of his v-berth into calf deep water.

To repeat: get some knowledgeable advice before connecting it!


Agreed!! In my 40 years of cruising, I've heard of numerous sinkings due to shore water connections.

Never had one. Never will. I'll top of as needed. Thanks
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