Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-11-2018, 11:34 PM   #21
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 19,164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
Hi Wifey B;
OK but up here it's not so.
But our waters are much more protected. You can run a 14' OB boat to Alaska by roughing it some and watching weather. And obviously one can change course 15 degrees or so to avoid excessive rolling.
Wifey B: OP's question was about the Caribbean though.

And you might have a higher tolerance for rolling than most newer cruisers would have. You can make it without stabilization, but stabilizers sure help the enjoyment factor.
__________________
Advertisement

BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2018, 12:27 AM   #22
Guru
 
Lepke's Avatar
 
City: Between Oregon and Alaska
Country: US
Vessel Name: Charlie Harper
Vessel Model: Wheeler Shipyard 83'
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,983
A big planing hull burns 30 to 60 gph at speed. Because the engines are big, even idling along burns more fuel than a displacement hull. And the turbo engines have to be rebuilt more often because of the heat running at top rpm. A displacement hull will have engines of about 1/4 of the hp of the big engines. My 83' displacement hull will do 12 knots flat out but cruises at 10 knots using 1 gl/nm.
__________________

Lepke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2018, 01:42 AM   #23
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 19,164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lepke View Post
A big planing hull burns 30 to 60 gph at speed. Because the engines are big, even idling along burns more fuel than a displacement hull. And the turbo engines have to be rebuilt more often because of the heat running at top rpm. A displacement hull will have engines of about 1/4 of the hp of the big engines. My 83' displacement hull will do 12 knots flat out but cruises at 10 knots using 1 gl/nm.
All true but then there are more planing boats sold for recreational use than full displacement. Clearly, there's a place for both.

As a comparison, an 85' Pacific Mariner will run 27 knots at WOT and cruise at 23-24 knots. At 23 knots, it uses 4 gallons per nautical mile. However, at 10 knots it will get 0.71 nmpg or use 1.4 gallons per nautical mile. So, at 10 knots your boat is 40% more efficient.

Now the larger the boat being discussed the greater percentage that will be full displacement. I'd been around boating for 40 years before I even knew there were full displacement boats. To my knowledge, there were none on the lake but that was boats primarily 30' and less.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2018, 07:57 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
BrianSmith's Avatar
 
City: Wherever Smartini is
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Smartini
Vessel Model: 2002 Kristen 52' Flybridge Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 471
One aspect I haven't seen mentioned so far is rolling at anchor. We've spent the last 8 months all over the Bahamas, mostly anchoring, and have had a half-dozen nights that were downright uncomfortable because of a side swell. Our full displacement hull rolls a LOT in that situation, and we don't have anything to lessen it. If you expect to be anchoring, you may want to consider flopper stoppers, or if you like to run your air con all the time (hence, your generator), maybe a Seakeeper (or other brand) gyro stabilizer. (They use a lot of electricity, so you have to run the gennie to use them.)

As for running from weather, and crossing the Gulf Stream quicker... my opinion is that it would be nice sometimes to have some speed for exactly those situations. Case in point: we were in Key West last year when it became clear that Irma was coming to the Keys. At 7 kts, though, we didn't feel like we had the option of getting out, because we couldn't get that far in the remaining 4 days we had to go. At 20 kts, I'm pretty sure we would have gone elsewhere. So no, you can't get out of a squall that you're already in... but with radar and 20 kts, you can probably skirt most sqalls that you see forming. And if it's a hurricane coming, you most definitely have the ability to relocate well out of the projected path, if you don't mind burning a lot of fuel.

And who doesn't want to cross the Gulf Stream in half or 1/3 the time, if it's 3' and 5 seconds?

They key factor for us in choosing a hull type, when we were boat shopping, was fuel economy, followed very closely by engine room space. We chose a single engine FD hull for the slightly-better-than 1nmpg, and a walk-in engine room with 360 degree access to the main engine.

Oh... to really stir things up... what about a motor cat? We've seen some absolutely beautiful boats of that configuration - Horizon and Endeavour come to mind. And if you like living space, you just can't beat a cat.
BrianSmith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2018, 08:51 AM   #25
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 8,837
Dave907
Yes, as noted, FD hulls benefit greatly from stabilization. If you're ever on one, turn off the stabilizers and note the difference. North Baltic and Codger are right about Flemings. Solid well built vessels. We spent some time with Tony and crew this past summer aboard his 65'er. His vessel, voyages, distance traveled and trip planning are amazing.

Lots of choices for the OP whether displacement or SD. My favorites in his price range are the FD Nordhavn 47 and DeFever 56. The really good ones sell in a flash though, I've been looking for same and have been late to the party several times.

Flemings are much more expensive. You could always stretch your budget, but other choices are out there. Keep an eye out for the Pacific Mariner 65. Designed by Bill Garden and Greg Marshall. And with Westport build quality.

Good luck in you hunt, sounds like you're on the right track and have received some good advice.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2018, 11:02 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
bogranjac1's Avatar
 
City: =
Country: western australia
Vessel Name: Nimiane
Vessel Model: Finn 8
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 342
[QUOTE=BrianSmith;715452]One aspect I haven't seen mentioned so far is rolling at anchor. We've spent the last 8 months all over the Bahamas, mostly anchoring, and have had a half-dozen nights that were downright uncomfortable because of a side swell. Our full displacement hull rolls a LOT in that situation, and we don't have anything to lessen it. If you expect to be anchoring, you may want to consider flopper stoppers, or if you like to run your air con all the time (hence, your generator), maybe a Seakeeper (or other brand) gyro stabilizer. (They use a lot of electricity, so you have to run the gennie to use them.)

I didn't realize that a gyro stabilizer or seakeeper would stabilize a boat stationary at anchor ?
bogranjac1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2018, 11:11 AM   #27
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 17,091
I see that since most all of our waters in the PNW are protected from ocean slop or seas the FD hulled boat is much more usable and add to that most anchorages are protected even from other boat wakes.

And FD boats like the Allweather have much more fuel burn advantage than boats with partially submerged transoms. Sailboats don’t have submerged transoms for that reason.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2018, 11:34 AM   #28
Moderator Emeritus
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 4,687
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave907 View Post
Nope! I've owned a 3870 Bayliner before the 2002 3988 Bayliner I own now. I also own a 1988 32' 3288 Bayliner that I keep in Alaska for Summer cruising, but never a 4788.
Hello Dave

I have a 4788 in Seward Alaska
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2018, 04:42 PM   #29
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 19,164
[QUOTE=bogranjac1;715486]
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianSmith View Post

I didn't realize that a gyro stabilizer or seakeeper would stabilize a boat stationary at anchor ?
They're actually better at anchor than underway. They're excellent at zero and low speed where fins aren't as effective unless zero speed systems.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2018, 05:34 PM   #30
Guru
 
Simi 60's Avatar
 
City: Queensland
Country: Australia
Vessel Model: Milkraft 60 converted timber trawler
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 2,729
Quote:
Originally Posted by bogranjac1 View Post

I didn't realize that a gyro stabilizer or seakeeper would stabilize a boat stationary at anchor ?
Have to run a genset continually though so flopper stoppers being cheap and zero fuel for the win.
Simi 60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2018, 06:40 PM   #31
Bud
Senior Member
 
Bud's Avatar
 
City: KEY COLONY BEACH
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Izzy Rose
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 49
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 236
Welcome,
I to was a commercial fisherman but in the gulf of Maine for 25 years. My commercial boat did 8.5 knots and it was usually rough enough you couldn’t go any faster than that anyways. We moved down the Florida Keys 10 years ago and bought a center console cateraman. We have been to all the northern Bahamas islands with it. With this experience under our belt we bought a Grand Banks 49 this summer and plan on continuing our exploring of the Bahamas. We decided on slow and comfortable for a few reasons. Cost of travel, fuel is expensive over there. More comfortable for family (grandkids). It takes longer to get places but you can cook a thanksgiven dinner on the way or play a game of chess etc...
Bud
Bud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2018, 01:09 PM   #32
Veteran Member
 
City: Cape Coral, FL
Country: US
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
Hello Dave

I have a 4788 in Seward Alaska
Greetings! I'm from Cordova, so I think we beat you on rain (but just by a little). I think the late 90s early 2000s Bayliners are often overlooked. Having now owned 3 of them they're really great boats. My only complaint was the the 38' was underpowered with the Hinos, but as long as you just treated her like a trawler and ran around at 8 knots, it was perfect.

The 4788 looks like a great rig. Never been on one, but peered into the windows of several in harbors.

Cheers!

Dave
dave907 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2018, 01:10 PM   #33
Veteran Member
 
City: Cape Coral, FL
Country: US
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 33
Everyone: Thanks a bunch for all the great information and experience shares. As I said, I'm new to this forum, but so far I've been very impressed with the depth of knowledge, willingness to share, and the courtesy between members. Hard to find all three of those things on the Internet.

Cheers!

Dave
__________________

dave907 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×