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Old 10-02-2021, 08:56 AM   #61
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Thanks Hal. That puts information of both in one place.
Let's hope some owners will chime in. SMILE
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Old 10-02-2021, 09:30 AM   #62
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Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
I believe just the opposite, every time I didn't run the carb dry, the 4 stroke, 8hp Yamaha with ethanol fuel needed cleaning before it would start.

My circle of friends have reported the same..

Stabilizer is a must too.

Due to Covid, I have been unable to get marked "mid-grade" gas (up to 5% ethanol) at the Co-op station in Ganges, so have been using ethanol-free premium in all of my small engines. All are preforming far better this year, including my Honda 40 outboard.

My experience using any fuel with ethanol in it has been noticeably poor. I have used Seafoam for winter storage, but still have had carb problems. Honda sold me some carb cleaning spray-in stuff, dissolves the ethanol varnish and burns it with lots of smoke. Seemed to work, but since then, no Eth, no problems.
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Old 10-02-2021, 11:52 AM   #63
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You may not like my suggestion, but I put it out there for you to think it through. The reality for us older farts is that whatever is heavy now is going to get heavier in the future. I see a motor that isn't to bad in weight now, becoming a sea anchor in my latter years as I drop it unintentionally. I also include lugging batteries around in the electric propulsion systems.

Something like Sea Wise davits is expensive but it will extend your boating experience without moving heavy things around. Once the motor is on the bracket for the davit system, it remains on until it is removed for servicing or whatever. For that task on my davit system, moving an engine that has become heavy for me, I see myself asking for help from one of the younger marina members. I'm practising my pitiful face look so I can look convincing to this younger volunteer.

The price is high, search for used ones, how I got mine, it will be the easiest of all options you are considering using currently.

Sea Wise Manual Davit system: I'm showing you the manual set up rather than the electric (there is one) as it is cheaper. You can use a cordless electric drill to haul the dinghy up and save thousands.

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Old 10-02-2021, 12:31 PM   #64
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Originally Posted by rsn48 View Post
You may not like my suggestion, but I put it out there for you to think it through. The reality for us older farts is that whatever is heavy now is going to get heavier in the future. I see a motor that isn't to bad in weight now, becoming a sea anchor in my latter years as I drop it unintentionally. I also include lugging batteries around in the electric propulsion systems.

Something like Sea Wise davits is expensive but it will extend your boating experience without moving heavy things around. Once the motor is on the bracket for the davit system, it remains on until it is removed for servicing or whatever. For that task on my davit system, moving an engine that has become heavy for me, I see myself asking for help from one of the younger marina members. I'm practising my pitiful face look so I can looking convincing to this younger volunteer.

The price is high, search for used ones, how I got mine, it will be the easiest of all options you are considering using currently.

Sea Wise Manual Davit system: I'm showing you the manual set up rather than the electric (there is one) as it is cheaper. You can use a cordless electric drill to haul the dinghy up and save thousands.

Nope, appreciate and like your suggestion. I've thought of going this route but I would most likely need to rebuild my original narrow and thinning teak swim platform which would add significant cost. My other concern or question is whether or not the rule of having the transom-mounted boat name/hailing port blocked or covered on the transom of a documented vessel is a REAL rule or one of those official things that are overlooked. I believe I could move them to the sides of the boat but that adds more hassle and cost.

I also agree on how things don't seem to be getting lighter as I get older. However, the electric outboards are featherweight. The small gas outboards like a Yamaha 6 HP are 55 lbs or so. The 4 hp is even less. I should be able to handle a short move of that weight for a few more years.

I'm afraid to ask but what is the estimated cost of the Seawise system? I know they vary "depending"...but just an estimate.
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Old 10-02-2021, 12:37 PM   #65
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I can see the sea wise as a solution for many. My former 200lb dingy was on a manual swimgrid davit, once lowered I had to man handle the OB onto transom.
My solution get a lighter inflatable about 110lb, mount the OB about 60lb + 10lb propane tank and use the existing mast/boom with an ATV 12V winch $120 and load it on top of the aft cabin. No more manual labor. And I like the clean looking swimgrid/transom.
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Old 10-02-2021, 12:39 PM   #66
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Small 2T OB Engines

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Originally Posted by Slowmo View Post
A small 2cycle or 4 cycle are both reasonable options. I would never use an electric mainly due to the limited power and range, this can be a life and death difference in the wrong conditions. To me electric is for the person who thinks nothing will ever go wrong. 2T engines are simpler than 4T and have a higher power to weight ratio. Its true that 4T engines have lower emissions, though the difference is not nearly what some seem to think. Modern 2T are relatively clean. Advantages of the 4T is no premixing. Advantages of the 2T is lower maintenance (no oil changes), lighter weight, and the engine can be placed in any position (you can't with a 4T due to the oil in the sump).

Very well put and almost exactly what I think.
The rope on the bow is a fender .. tugboat style. Bought the boat from Dan who worked for years in the fishery at "Bristol Bay. He was the Captain on a 140’ powered barge. The rowboat was the dinghy. In good shape considering the obvious.
I have a 60hp 4T Suzuki The rest of my OB’ds are 2T. Izzatt what 2 stroke and 4 stroke are called now .. 2T Nd 4T? OK w meee.

My favorite OB now is my 4hp 2 cylinder 2 stroke Evinrude. Basically the same as hordes of 3 and 3 1/2hp OMC outboards from about 1949 to about … I’m not really sure .. 80’s? Were these small 2T twins made into the 80’s? I prefer the remote fuel tank version w the weedless prop. Same # of power strokes as a 4 cYl. 4T engine. Quite to very smooth and little noise for a small OB.

Here it is on my 12’ “Gig Harbor” rowboat.
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Old 10-02-2021, 12:46 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by koliver View Post

Due to Covid, I have been unable to get marked "mid-grade" gas (up to 5% ethanol) at the Co-op station in Ganges, so have been using ethanol-free premium in all of my small engines. All are preforming far better this year, including my Honda 40 outboard.

My experience using any fuel with ethanol in it has been noticeably poor. I have used Seafoam for winter storage, but still have had carb problems. Honda sold me some carb cleaning spray-in stuff, dissolves the ethanol varnish and burns it with lots of smoke. Seemed to work, but since then, no Eth, no problems.
Interesting. I use 94 ethanol free chevron in all vehicles, so the gas can is 94 for lawnmower, but never thought about it performing better since never used other.
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Old 10-02-2021, 12:49 PM   #68
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To me electric is for the person who thinks nothing will ever go wrong.

I got a laugh out of this one. My take is exactly the opposite! I think electrics are for those folks (like me) that are convinced that something will always go wrong with an gas outboard motor.

I understand the desire for more power from a dinghy. Folks always point to the idea of using it as emergency propulsion, getting to, or away from, something important in a dinghy. We both know the problems that canít arise in the PNW and SW BC with some of our high current and tidal areas.

Anyway, for years I used Gas outboards on dinghies. Now for years Iíve been using a Torqeedo. I like the Torqeedo much better.

However, Iím about to go back to gas with a 20hp Tahatsu. Iím trading the convenience, reliability, lack of maintenance, to trade for some speed and increased range. To be honest, Iím really doing it because my wife thinks she would like the speed and increased range. So even though that might be nice on rare occasions, most of the time it is going to be pointless. Iím doing it to make her happy.
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Old 10-02-2021, 01:00 PM   #69
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I got a laugh out of this one. My take is exactly the opposite! I think electrics are for those folks (like me) that are convinced that something will always go wrong with an gas outboard motor.

I understand the desire for more power from a dinghy. Folks always point to the idea of using it as emergency propulsion, getting to, or away from, something important in a dinghy. We both know the problems that canít arise in the PNW and SW BC with some of our high current and tidal areas.

Anyway, for years I used Gas outboards on dinghies. Now for years Iíve been using a Torqeedo. I like the Torqeedo much better.

However, Iím about to go back to gas with a 20hp Tahatsu. Iím trading the convenience, reliability, lack of maintenance, to trade for some speed and increased range. To be honest, Iím really doing it because my wife thinks she would like the speed and increased range. So even though that might be nice on rare occasions, most of the time it is going to be pointless. Iím doing it to make her happy.
dhays, you may already know this but you may be able to purchase a Tohatsu OB
directly and avoid the dealer installation fees.

I bought a Tohatsu 18 electric start that they shipped directly to me after I was able
to convince them I had the requisite knowledge and experience to install it myself.
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Old 10-02-2021, 01:08 PM   #70
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dhays, you may already know this but you may be able to purchase a Tohatsu OB

directly and avoid the dealer installation fees.



I bought a Tohatsu 18 electric start that they shipped directly to me after I was able

to convince them I had the requisite knowledge and experience to install it myself.

I probably could buy one, however, I donít have the requisite knowledge, experience, skill, or time to do it myself. So this is one of those things where Iím very happy to pay the guy to completely setup my new dinghy for me.

When I was younger, I thought I had to do everything myself. Now I sometimes decide that even if I could figure it out and do it myself, my time and money are better spent elsewhere.

I do appreciate the suggestion however.
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Old 10-02-2021, 01:19 PM   #71
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I got a laugh out of this one. My take is exactly the opposite! I think electrics are for those folks (like me) that are convinced that something will always go wrong with an gas outboard motor]

For my dinghy I seriously looked at all three options. But to add in one more factor to the equation, my boat is a single engine gasser. And with a single engine I do worry about it crapping out, even though I repowered with a new Merc 6.2 I/O. One of my closest friends i a now retired BC Ferries Captain and I went over all the options with him, the advantages and disadvantages.

His first comment about electric was range under a light load versus range under a heavy load such as in a side tow scenario with my dinghy if the engine craps out (I do belong to C Tow). The answer of course is - no one knows.

With propane he said my limitation was most likely the 5 horsepower, will I wish I had more horsepower in a side tow situation. Also how much propane will be in the tank when my loss of power emergency arises, again - no one knows.

With a 9.9 gasser even if the fuel tank is low I can run a line down into one of my gas tanks for my stern drive and pull out some fuel. And with 9.9 hp I have enough power to move my boat along at 5 or 6 knots. I personally would have preferred electric and was very close to purchasing one - probably Epropulsion.
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Old 10-02-2021, 01:26 PM   #72
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the transom-mounted boat name/hailing port blocked or covered on the transom of a documented vessel is a REAL rule or one of those official things that are overlooked.

It may be a real rule that isn't enforced. I don't even know if it is a rule for us in British Columbia but I don't care as so many have dinghy mounted davits and I've heard of no one being stopped. Of course the name of my boat is also at my bow on both sides.
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Old 10-02-2021, 01:40 PM   #73
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Okay, here are 2 questions I thought I would never ask.
What is the difference between the Torqeedo and the Spirit 1.0?
What is the down side of each electric motor?

I have an old Torqeedo, so I donít know what improvements have been made since I bought mine and havenít looked at anything else since.

One small weak point to my Torqeedo is that the cables have screw connectors which are plastic. They are plenty strong and are waterproof. However, you do have to be very careful not to cross thread the connector between the battery and motor. It can be a bit tricky to get it aligned properly.

Beyond that, Iíve not found any other downsides.
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Old 10-02-2021, 01:48 PM   #74
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the transom-mounted boat name/hailing port blocked or covered on the transom of a documented vessel is a REAL rule or one of those official things that are overlooked.

It may be a real rule that isn't enforced. I don't even know if it is a rule for us in British Columbia but I don't care as so many have dinghy mounted davits and I've heard of no one being stopped. Of course the name of my boat is also at my bow on both sides.

My understanding is that the Federal requirements simply donít address the issue of a dinghy obscuring a name and hailing port on the stern. State and local law enforcement donít have any authority to enforce the USCG regulations and Iíve never heard of anyone that has had the USCG object to a dinghy on the swim platform obscuring the name.

Having said that, I do want to add my boat name to the bow on either side as well as put the boat name on the bottom of the dinghy. That isnít to meet any legal requirement but for the convenience of other boaters who may need to find, contact, or identify me.
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Old 10-02-2021, 01:57 PM   #75
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Just an FYI for those that think the electric motors problem is RANGE. Range is not a problem with electric motors, SPEED is a problem. If you want or need to go fast, the small electric motors are not for you. But range is not an issue. A full charge on a Torqeedo (which only takes about 2 or 3 hours) has a range of 30 miles. Albeit, going 2-4 knots! But you will get there without issue. I've run around all day long with my Torqeedo, to the beach, to the dock, around the harbor to check out all the boats, back to the dock for some water, then again to go out for dinner, then back for some drinks...... I'm still above 50% on the battery. And if youd get/add the solar charger, you can charge as your going or while your sitting on the beach... so range is not a problem really. BUT, speed is. The electric motors are VERY convenient, light weight, easy to mount, easy to transport, easy to store, no maintenance, no gas, no oil, no CARB! The only downfall is, speed. And this I suspect will be fixed very soon with some new models that will be 4hp or better.
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Old 10-02-2021, 02:20 PM   #76
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If your small boat blocks the name and hailing port, put in on the bottom of small boat.
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Old 10-03-2021, 08:02 AM   #77
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I have an old Torqeedo, so I donít know what improvements have been made since I bought mine and havenít looked at anything else since.

One small weak point to my Torqeedo is that the cables have screw connectors which are plastic. They are plenty strong and are waterproof. However, you do have to be very careful not to cross thread the connector between the battery and motor. It can be a bit tricky to get it aligned properly.

Beyond that, Iíve not found any other downsides.
I believe the connection issue on the older Torqueedo 1003 model was addressed on the new 1103C with a more robust fitting. They also went to direct drive to help with what people describe as a whining noise. Not that I have read much about these motors.
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Old 10-03-2021, 08:15 AM   #78
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My understanding is that the Federal requirements simply donít address the issue of a dinghy obscuring a name and hailing port on the stern. State and local law enforcement donít have any authority to enforce the USCG regulations and Iíve never heard of anyone that has had the USCG object to a dinghy on the swim platform obscuring the name.

Having said that, I do want to add my boat name to the bow on either side as well as put the boat name on the bottom of the dinghy. That isnít to meet any legal requirement but for the convenience of other boaters who may need to find, contact, or identify me.
USCG Regulations posted on BoatUS:

- The above requirement for vessel name and hailing port to be clearly visible may necessitate duplicating the name and hailing port on either side of the hull.

- When dinghyís are stored on the swim platform or transom causing the vessel's name and hailing port to be obscured from view, there is no Federal requirement to place the name and hailing port elsewhere. That is a Law Enforcement issue only.

-Stenciling on the bottom of the dinghy is not considered a permanent marking.


I guess I am worried about nothing although not sure what "That is a Law Enforcement issue only" means. I guess a state could require the name/port to be visible on the boat if that is required in that state but a documented boat isn't registered in a particular state and they have no say over USCG documented boats. Again, worried about something when there are SOOOO many other things to worry about.
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Old 10-03-2021, 10:32 AM   #79
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Interesting. I use 94 ethanol free chevron in all vehicles, so the gas can is 94 for lawnmower, but never thought about it performing better since never used other.
The octane rating needed for small OBís and lawnmowers is probably about 66. The reason non-alchol fuel is high octane is so the high performance motorcyclist and the home owner can buy from the same pump.
But I think the only downside is money .. bout $5.00 a gallon.
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Old 10-03-2021, 11:10 AM   #80
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Originally Posted by rsn48 View Post
You may not like my suggestion, but I put it out there for you to think it through. The reality for us older farts is that whatever is heavy now is going to get heavier in the future. I see a motor that isn't to bad in weight now, becoming a sea anchor in my latter years as I drop it unintentionally. I also include lugging batteries around in the electric propulsion systems.

Something like Sea Wise davits is expensive but it will extend your boating experience without moving heavy things around. Once the motor is on the bracket for the davit system, it remains on until it is removed for servicing or whatever. For that task on my davit system, moving an engine that has become heavy for me, I see myself asking for help from one of the younger marina members. I'm practising my pitiful face look so I can look convincing to this younger volunteer.

The price is high, search for used ones, how I got mine, it will be the easiest of all options you are considering using currently.
I had the same long term management concerns when I moved our dinghy storage from the upper boat deck to the transom. Even pivoting an outboard a la Seawise wasnít appealing to me. I installed a Dinghy Butler, which letís me launch in 15 seconds and retrieve in 30 seconds. The stainless steel version has no problem handling our fully loaded 550-lb dink. We have a 20-hp Suzuki 4-stroke with remote start, tilt and trim and electric start = 120-lbs. with the dink deployed, the davit takes up little more room on the swim platform than a Seawise. Lighter boat/motor combinations are no problem for the aluminum version of the Dinghy Butler, which retails at about $3,700.

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