Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-22-2021, 06:57 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
Tigs's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 70
Choosing the right outboard for my dinghy

(sorry if I'm posted this in the wrong forum)

Ok so I need to decide which outboard I need for my dinghy, headed to the Bahamas next year from my home port of Montreal. Let me know which one you would pick and why.

The Dinghy, AB 9.5 AL ... aluminum ribbed inflatable 9 feet 6 inches, weight empty 49 kilos (108Lbs) recommend 8HP Max 15HP

Dinghy and engine will be lifted by my boom onto the flybridge rated at 125 kilos (275 Lbs)

engine choice
1: Tohatsu 9.8 HP with carburetor weight of 37 kilos (81.5 Lbs)
2: Tohatsu 9.9 HP with EFI weight 43 kilos (94.7 Lbs)
3: Tohatsu 15 HP with EFI weight 43 kilos (94.7 Lbs)

The weight is important because I don't want to get close to the boom-rated lift capacity when you add besides the weight of the dinghy and engine, the oars, fuel, and anything else found on the dinghy. the boom itself is not inspiring and would like to stay far away from the 125kilo.


The dinghy will obviously be used often in the Bahamas, hence the boom will be used often too. The carb version helps me with the weight and I figure it's easier to work on it if it requires maintenance. The fuel injection version can be tricky seeing I`ll be in the Bahamas and probably far from a certified repairman. but then again I`m buying the engine new.

Is 9.8 HP strong enough for the size of my dinghy seeing I will be doing heavy supply runs?

forgot to add it will be a 4 stroke engine seeing a 2 stroke is not sold up here in Canada. I don't know if they banned them in the US.

thanks for any advice and or suggestions you might have.

(The boat a Swift Trawler 34)
__________________
Advertisement

Tigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2021, 07:18 PM   #2
Guru
 
City: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island
Vessel Name: Capricorn
Vessel Model: Mariner 30 - Sedan Cruiser 1969
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,683
Which ever one you get, one with EFI is best. Don't forget Suzuki.
__________________

rsn48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2021, 07:20 PM   #3
Veteran Member
 
Crossroads's Avatar
 
City: Friday Harbor
Vessel Name: Crossroads
Vessel Model: North Pacific 34
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 36
We use the 9.8 on our AB 10AL. It will plane easily with two of us plus dog (total 475#).

However, I bought an EPCarry last year and find that we use it more often than the Tohatsu or rowing. Its slow (3-4 kt) with limited run time (2-3hr) between charges, but its so damn light, easy and convenient. Perfect for watering the dog 3-4 times a day.

Still, for longer runs or setting/checking pots, we use the 9.8.
Crossroads is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2021, 07:31 PM   #4
Veteran Member
 
Tigs's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crossroads View Post
We use the 9.8 on our AB 10AL. It will plane easily with two of us plus dog (total 475#).

However, I bought an EPCarry last year and find that we use it more often than the Tohatsu or rowing. Its slow (3-4 kt) with limited run time (2-3hr) between charges, but its so damn light, easy and convenient. Perfect for watering the dog 3-4 times a day.

Still, for longer runs or setting/checking pots, we use the 9.8.
Ok so you have the 9.8 with the carb, and your dingy is slightly bigger and you say you plane easily that is good to hear, thanks for the info and the link.
Tigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2021, 08:05 PM   #5
Guru
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 10,822
Personally I would go with the 15 hp. Just because you have more hp doesnít mean that you have to use it but when you need it you will have the power. And the weight difference is negligible.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you arenít one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2021, 08:11 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
jungpeter's Avatar
 
City: Everett
Vessel Name: LIBERTY
Vessel Model: TOLLY 48
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 323
Hi Tigs,

You'll never regret more power on your dinghy. If you can stand the weight of the 9.9 EFI Tohatsu, then I strongly suggest the 15 hp version-it weighs the same. And my choice for induction systems on outboards is fuel injection, hands down, every time.

However, I caution you to actually weigh the various components of the dinghy, including the full fuel tank, the outboard, and any other kit you plan to lug along. And, obviously, if you can't weigh the whole mess until after you buy it, you're stuck making an educated guess at the actual weight. But in my experience, the "book value" of weights for both the outboard and dinghy are understated.

On a positive note, both the Tohatsu fuel injected outboards, and the AB aluminum-bottomed dinghies are first class all around.

Regards,

Pete
jungpeter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2021, 08:16 PM   #7
Guru
 
KnotYet's Avatar
 
City: Los Angeles
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 559
I love my Tohatsu 18 w/carb but would recommend the 15 EFI.
When I bought my Tohatsu I convinced them to ship it directly to me in spite
of their policy of only selling motors over a certain size through a dealer.
That saved the price of installing it.
__________________
Science doesn't care what you believe. -Neil deGrasse Tyson
KnotYet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2021, 09:31 PM   #8
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: penultimate Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 12,180
Found a 5-horsepower Seagull (auxiliary power for my past small cutter) at my handling limit.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2021, 11:11 PM   #9
Guru
 
koliver's Avatar
 
City: Saltspring Island
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,828
I have been through several dinghies, several different outboards. Here is what I have learned.
Never settle for "just enough"
If the hoist is insufficient, change it.
If your proposed use is heavy hauling, get a bigger dinghy, even if it means towing rather than carrying.
If you think you can't afford to go to the larger, more expensive alternative, you will regret that choice.

Putting in your criteria, I would go for the max hp that will get you on a plane with your "full" load, even if the dinghy capacity plate maxes out below what you need. I did exactly that with a Caribe 10, I put on a 20, 2 stroke, and had to add smart tabs to keep it in the water, but had an awesome ride that sold instantly when I moved up.

My present Caribe 12 with a Honda 40 is another awesome ride, carries 4 on a plane, allows heavy loads on shopping trips, carries traps and a line puller,......
I can't carry anything larger, though I would trade up to a 14 or maybe bigger if I could. The ride on a longer, heavier dinghy is better, no doubt about it.
Bottom line, go as big as you can. Both dinghy and outboard.
__________________
Keith
koliver is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 12:51 AM   #10
Guru
 
Benthic2's Avatar
 
City: Boston Area
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 1,793
I'm not sure how import duties would apply and I'm not suggesting you break any laws....but you could buy a 2-Stroke ouboard in the Bahamas.

https://www.hbsmarine.com/two-strokes
Benthic2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 04:30 AM   #11
Guru
 
High Wire's Avatar
 
City: Cape May, NJ and Englewood, FL
Vessel Name: Irish Lady
Vessel Model: Monk 36
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,711
If you don’t have to carry it, 15 efi.
__________________
Archie
Irish Lady
1984 Monk 36 Hull #46
Currently in Englewood Florida.
High Wire is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 07:25 AM   #12
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 21,628
"but you could buy a 2-Stroke ouboard in the Bahamas."

The 2 strokes are the easiest to restore if the engine gets dunked.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 07:31 AM   #13
Guru
 
Datenight's Avatar
 
City: Groton, CT
Vessel Name: Datenight
Vessel Model: North Pacific 45
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 760
We just went through the same thing. Our dinghy is an AB 10' AL Lamina. Weight is #128. I wanted a 15 hp Tohatsu EFI from what I have read here and other sources. When discussing the motor with the dealer (Defender) he pointed out that the weight of the 15 and 20 was the same, #95. No brainer. The boat was rated for up to 20 hp so we bought the 20.

While it cost a little more, as has been mentioned here that is gone quickly. Also, you don't have to run it on the stops! Our crane on the NP 45 is rated for #600. We should be fine there. I figure with anchor, chain and line, gas (came with 3 gal tank) life jackets the boat will be well under #300. Well within crane capacity.

Rob
__________________
North Pacific 45
Datenight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 07:48 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
DCDC's Avatar
 
City: New Orleans
Vessel Name: Stella
Vessel Model: Seaton 56
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 187
You will want a planing rig for the Bahamas. There are so many cays, inlets and reefs to explore. We often spend half a day snorkeling or visiting beaches miles apart in an AB 11AL with an old Mercury 25. I would guess that we have an additional 150 lb of gear (fuel tank, 6 gallons fuel, start battery, oars, manual bilge pump, lift bridle, tow line, anchor & rode, a few tools, first aid kit, flares, nav light, water bottles, snorkeling/fishing stuff, handheld VHF, patch kit, air pump, PFD’s, bucket, some of which is water soaked).

I would be concerned about any lifting equipment with less than 2X actual load, industrial standards seem to be around 4X. There will also be dynamic loads as the dinghy swings/boat rocks due to waves, wakes and wind.
DCDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 08:27 AM   #15
Veteran Member
 
Tigs's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCDC View Post
You will want a planing rig for the Bahamas. There are so many cays, inlets and reefs to explore. We often spend half a day snorkeling or visiting beaches miles apart in an AB 11AL with an old Mercury 25. I would guess that we have an additional 150 lb of gear (fuel tank, 6 gallons fuel, start battery, oars, manual bilge pump, lift bridle, tow line, anchor & rode, a few tools, first aid kit, flares, nav light, water bottles, snorkeling/fishing stuff, handheld VHF, patch kit, air pump, PFDís, bucket, some of which is water soaked).

I would be concerned about any lifting equipment with less than 2X actual load, industrial standards seem to be around 4X. There will also be dynamic loads as the dinghy swings/boat rocks due to waves, wakes and wind.
This is my concern too, even though the boom is rated at 125kilo I'll be close to 100 no matter the engine I choose. I'm changing the cheek blocks on the boom to make it less forceful to lift but it doesn't remove the strain on the boom. I think I will try to make the first lift with it and see how the boom reacts. If it starts creaking and swaying I might have to lift the engine and dinghy separately and if that is the case I'll go with the powerful engine because the weight does not matter then. thanks for your insight
Tigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 09:28 AM   #16
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,460
There are outboard mechanics in every nook and cranny of the Bahamas, and plenty of fellow cruisers to lend a hand too. Plus get the service manual for the engine , they are easy to DIY. You'll likely find yourself towing the dinghy more often than not.

I'd make really sure you calculate the total weight accurately.

And yes, get the 15hp.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 09:30 AM   #17
Veteran Member
 
City: Jupiter
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 31
Lifting the dingy and engine separately will be a PITA. There are many times you will want to move short distances and you may plan to just tow the dingy. From experience, light dingies don't tow very well as they can fly in wind over about 20kts - think quick thunderstorms. Get something you can lift easily and quickly in adverse conditions.
Also, if you are thinking less horsepower, I had a 9.8 AB Al rib, that came with a 6hp 4 stroke Suzuki (may have been 5). It was a single cylinder engine and would plane with about 200 lbs, but felt like a weed whacker. Sold it a week later.
TBill36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 10:23 AM   #18
Guru
 
Dougcole's Avatar
 
City: Carrabelle, FL
Vessel Name: Morgan
Vessel Model: '05 Mainship 40T
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,718
Absolutely no brainer, go with the 15.



As others have said, to get the most out of the Bahamas you need a dinghy with real range. It's not like the US where you spend a lot of time in marinas or are just putting from an anchor spot to a nearby dock. There are some times when you have short dinghy runs but there will be lots of times you want to run longer distances. We sometimes put more than 20 miles a day on our tender over there, I wouldn't want to do that in a slow dinghy or one that I had to run wide open all of the time.


As far as weight goes, is 12 lbs really going to be the difference in how much your boom can handle? If that puts you over the top you are probably too close to the limit anyway.


One other tip. Through bolt the motor to the transom. The tender will run better and you don't have to worry about the clamps vibrating loose. It also makes the motor harder to steal.
Dougcole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 10:24 AM   #19
Veteran Member
 
Tigs's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBill36 View Post
Lifting the dingy and engine separately will be a PITA. There are many times you will want to move short distances and you may plan to just tow the dingy. From experience, light dingies don't tow very well as they can fly in wind over about 20kts - think quick thunderstorms. Get something you can lift easily and quickly in adverse conditions.
Also, if you are thinking less horsepower, I had a 9.8 AB Al rib, that came with a 6hp 4 stroke Suzuki (may have been 5). It was a single cylinder engine and would plane with about 200 lbs, but felt like a weed whacker. Sold it a week later.
I understand but if towing the dinghy short distances, I'll be going no more than trawler speed of 8 knts or so I'm not too worried about it getting caught in the wind but it's certainly something to pay attention to.
Tigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 10:30 AM   #20
Veteran Member
 
Tigs's Avatar
 
City: Montreal
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dougcole View Post
Absolutely no brainer, go with the 15.



As others have said, to get the most out of the Bahamas you need a dinghy with real range. It's not like the US where you spend a lot of time in marinas or are just putting from an anchor spot to a nearby dock. There are some times when you have short dinghy runs but there will be lots of times you want to run longer distances. We sometimes put more than 20 miles a day on our tender over there, I wouldn't want to do that in a slow dinghy or one that I had to run wide open all of the time.


As far as weight goes, is 12 lbs really going to be the difference in how much your boom can handle? If that puts you over the top you are probably too close to the limit anyway.


One other tip. Through bolt the motor to the transom. The tender will run better and you don't have to worry about the clamps vibrating loose. It also makes the motor harder to steal.

Lots of good points, I am going today to see the Tohatsu dealer and will confirm the weight difference like you said 12 pounds is not a lot. But the more I think about it, I will be too close to the boom limit as one member said when you calculate all the other stuff besides the weight of the dinghy and engine. Boils down to lifting both engine and dinghy separately which I'm sure is time-consuming or reinforcing the entire boom system.
__________________

Tigs is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×