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Old 07-12-2020, 03:06 PM   #1
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This can't be good

I believe this is live, happening at 1:00 p.m. PST. The ship is in San Diego. I haven't heard the name yet and can't see the ID number on the superstructure through all the smoke.

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Old 07-12-2020, 03:11 PM   #2
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This is NOT a drill!!!!


Hope it turns out well..... but it's already a costly mistake.
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Old 07-12-2020, 03:12 PM   #3
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That is one of our amphibious warfare carriers for landing Marines via helicopters and landing craft (assuming it has the well deck configuration). The smoke indicates a truly massive fire throughout lots of the ship. If they can save her from total destruction, it could be years putting her back in service.
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Old 07-12-2020, 03:14 PM   #4
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It sure isnít good particularly with the 11 sailors hurt. The fires on the USS Bonhomme Richard while it is dry dock.

https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com...base-san-diego
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Old 07-12-2020, 03:15 PM   #5
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It's the Bonhomme Richard https://abcnews.go.com/US/11-sailors...ry?id=71742603
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Old 07-12-2020, 03:17 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post
It sure isnít good particularly with the 11 sailors hurt. The fires on the USS Bonhomme Richard while it is dry dock.

https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com...base-san-diego
Not in dry dock but maybe under overhaul at the yard.
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Old 07-12-2020, 03:19 PM   #7
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That has to be one of the most chilling sounds. Good they are not at sea, but still awful.
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Old 07-12-2020, 03:57 PM   #8
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If they had been at sea and not in a yard where all sorts of hoses and cables prevent closing of many water- and fire-proof doors, the chances of snuffing out the fire would be much greater. Being in a yard, your crew is under constant turnover from transfers and off-ship schooling and leave. As a command duty officer (the officer in charge of the ship in port) in numerous ships, I was often in the position of denying requests from critical fire fighters in my duty section for special liberty off the ship. It was a constant challenge to be ready to fight fire and flooding. At sea, you have the full crew and the General Quarters button right at your elbow. The full crew knows every inch of the fire fighting apparatus, is organized to use it, and motivated. The Bonhomme Richard is likely now in the hands of some of her crew but quite possibly a bunch of shore-based fire fighters who do not know her so well.
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Old 07-12-2020, 05:39 PM   #9
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Cutting or welding by yard personnel. That is the usual cause.
Now we have to figure out who was responsible for posting the fire watches and were they stationed on both sides of the bulkhead.
Next, proximity to fuel tanks and fuel lines. Type of fuel in the nearby tanks, levels too.
Flammable material nearby.
What type and how much fire fighting equipment was at the scene. Again, both sides of the bulkhead. Finally, the damage control training of the fire watches and first responders and how many minutes passed before the first attack of the casualty, with what equipment.
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Old 07-12-2020, 06:08 PM   #10
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If they had been at sea and not in a yard where all sorts of hoses and cables prevent closing of many water- and fire-proof doors, the chances of snuffing out the fire would be much greater.
I was thinking that might be the case. While it would have been much, much worse at sea, the cause may have been something that was only occurring because they were tied up. Your post puts details and experience to it.
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Old 07-12-2020, 11:09 PM   #11
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I saw the smoke today from Mission Bay where we were messing around. It was a massive smoke cloud, I thought Tijuana was on fire...
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Old 07-12-2020, 11:15 PM   #12
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The news reported an explosion before the fire. Donít know much more about it.
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Old 07-13-2020, 06:45 AM   #13
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Rich, I wondered about the firefighters from "Federal Fire". Outside contractors?
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgano View Post
If they had been at sea and not in a yard where all sorts of hoses and cables prevent closing of many water- and fire-proof doors, the chances of snuffing out the fire would be much greater. Being in a yard, your crew is under constant turnover from transfers and off-ship schooling and leave. As a command duty officer (the officer in charge of the ship in port) in numerous ships, I was often in the position of denying requests from critical fire fighters in my duty section for special liberty off the ship. It was a constant challenge to be ready to fight fire and flooding. At sea, you have the full crew and the General Quarters button right at your elbow. The full crew knows every inch of the fire fighting apparatus, is organized to use it, and motivated. The Bonhomme Richard is likely now in the hands of some of her crew but quite possibly a bunch of shore-based fire fighters who do not know her so well.
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Old 07-13-2020, 07:00 AM   #14
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Reported only 180 navy personnel on board at the time.
That no doubt contributed to the poor initial response.
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Old 07-13-2020, 10:17 AM   #15
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I used to work in a shipyard on submarine overhauls. Yep, skeleton Navy crew on board, lots of welding leads and hoses and various cables running through compartment hatch openings. Many systems out of service for work. Everyone takes fire safety very serious, but the ship is in a real vulnerable state.

There were rules where anything routed through a compartment hatch had to have quick connects nearby so the hatch could be closed somewhat quickly, but that is of little use when things go bad fast and yard crew scatters for self preservation. They don't have the same priorities as the Navy crew when at sea.
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Old 07-13-2020, 12:47 PM   #16
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180 out of a 1000-person crew aboard in a weekend duty section while in the yard is not out of line with normal peacetime policies. Consider that there may be as many as six duty sections and a goodly number of personnel at training schools and others who are not assigned to regular duty sections. My guess is that due to critical damage control positions needing to be retained aboard, the ship could not put together more than five duty sections. You can do the math.


Fire watches for welding by shipyard civilians were always provided by the ship's crew in my experience. Training of these people for an unaccustomed duty used to be, "Hey, here's a CO2 fire extinguisher; go watch for fire while this guy welds." I am sure it is a bit more involved nowadays including ensuring no flammables are nearby, but it was still a drain on the shorthanded crew in the yard back then and doubtless no less now.

If what I would consider highly unusual weekend welding was going on, I wonder if it was crew members and not yard workers doing it. Fire watch for either was probably the crew's responsibility which rolls right uphill to you know who, the captain.
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Old 07-13-2020, 07:23 PM   #17
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I don't have the article to hand now (was a local SD one), but it mentioned that the "explosion" was something like a very hot compartment releasing vs. one caused by fuel. I'm not sure I understand exactly what that means though.

I'll post a link if I find it again.
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Old 07-13-2020, 07:42 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgano View Post
If they had been at sea and not in a yard where all sorts of hoses and cables prevent closing of many water- and fire-proof doors, the chances of snuffing out the fire would be much greater. Being in a yard, your crew is under constant turnover from transfers and off-ship schooling and leave. As a command duty officer (the officer in charge of the ship in port) in numerous ships, I was often in the position of denying requests from critical fire fighters in my duty section for special liberty off the ship. It was a constant challenge to be ready to fight fire and flooding. At sea, you have the full crew and the General Quarters button right at your elbow. The full crew knows every inch of the fire fighting apparatus, is organized to use it, and motivated. The Bonhomme Richard is likely now in the hands of some of her crew but quite possibly a bunch of shore-based fire fighters who do not know her so well.
This is the best explanation i've heard. During interviews last night on TV I was wondering why a civilian fire company was taking the lead. The fire chief said all they would do is passively try to control the fire. WHAT??? When I was on active duty we had fire drills every night, and often twice a day. I was on the damage control team for the engine room (rescue 5) and it was always attack. attack, attack. We knew every inch of the ship and had drilled in every compartment. With most of the ships company gone and doors unable to close, well it doesn't look good.
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Old 07-13-2020, 07:49 PM   #19
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I believe many military facilities have civilian based fire departments these days....augmented with some military.

From..... https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...-18iV1V_4tfjK4

"Navy Fire and Emergency Services
Protecting Those Who Defend America
The Department of the Navy utilizes civilian Department of Defense firefighters to protect many
of their domestic and foreign installations, high value assets and assigned personnel. Navy
Region Mid-Atlantic Fire & Emergency Services members include Firefighter-EMT’s, Firefighter-
Paramedics, Fire Protection Inspectors and Fire Protection Specialists. They provide a wide
variety of emergency services, prevention, training, and other operations to support the
missions of the Navy.
Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Fire & Emergency Services is the DoD fire department that supports
Navy operations on the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast coasts of the United States. This includes
naval installations from North Carolina to Maine, and West to Indiana and Illinois.
Responsibilities of the department include structural, shipboard & aircraft firefighting operations,
emergency medical services, hazardous materials response, and technical rescue. The
department also has a fire prevention branch that performs inspections, promotes fire safety,
and interacts with civilian and active duty installation personnel."
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Old 07-13-2020, 08:20 PM   #20
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I'm sure the Navy Dept will figure out some way to blame and fire the Skipper for alleged shortcomings over this. (Wonder if he sent any e-mails recently?!?)

Depending on extent/severity of the damage, the ship may likely be judged not salvageable, especially since it's 23 years old. If it IS repairable, it will be years before it is available to the fleet again.
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