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Old 10-01-2017, 07:02 AM   #21
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Thanks again everyone! All of your suggestions should help fill in my traveling hours and then some.
FWIW, we've found it useful to get books -- and various systems documentation -- in softcopy format whenever possible, to minimize storage requirements on the boat.

Between Kindle, Nook, and Google Play -- and PDF downloads from system manufacturer's sites -- we've been able to build us a decent reference library that can live on each of our two tablets and each of our two laptops...

As for basic books, Chapman's, Beebe, Calder, etc... various books on docking and handling... etc...

-Chris
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Old 10-01-2017, 07:28 AM   #22
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Donít forget to enroll in boater safety classes. That would be first on my list. Both the Coast Guard and Power Squadron provide theses classes as well as others. I know several folks who tried to become boaters without embracing Boaters Safety. They all sold their unused boats. What you do well, you do often. What you fear you stay away from.
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Old 10-01-2017, 08:00 AM   #23
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Thanks once again to all. I have read a couple on the list already. Both my wife and I have e-readers and tablets. As much as we both love the feel of a book in our hands, we became digital converts years ago. So I appreciate the inclusion of online resources as well. Of course I've idled away more than a few hours already digging through TF!
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Old 10-01-2017, 08:06 AM   #24
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Donít forget to enroll in boater safety classes. That would be first on my list. Both the Coast Guard and Power Squadron provide theses classes as well as others. I know several folks who tried to become boaters without embracing Boaters Safety. They all sold their unused boats. What you do well, you do often. What you fear you stay away from.
Couldn't agree more. We own a 23' power boat now that we keep in Beaufort,NC. We took an online (BoatUS) safety course before we bought it. We hope to take a trawler specific training course next spring. This one will be more about acquainting ourselves with trawlers if we are still interested we will take more detailed courses as we get closer to retirement in late 2019.
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Old 10-01-2017, 12:04 PM   #25
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Book Recommendations

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Originally Posted by 4yanks View Post
Couldn't agree more. We own a 23' power boat now that we keep in Beaufort,NC. We took an online (BoatUS) safety course before we bought it. We hope to take a trawler specific training course next spring. This one will be more about acquainting ourselves with trawlers if we are still interested we will take more detailed courses as we get closer to retirement in late 2019.


I took the online courses and they were helpful, and I also had to train with an instructor for around 20 to 25 hours before my insurance company was comfortable letting me operate the boat without an instructor.

BUT, there is no substitute for just getting out there and doing it. Just make sure you have the proper safety equipment (and know how to use it), and take a baby step approach to sea conditions.

The swells we experienced a week ago would have given my wife and I a bit of anxiety 9 or 10 months ago when we first got the boat, and now they are no big deal.

That said, there are sea conditions that many on this forum would not be worried about that would probably terrify me. In fact I'm sure that's the case.

My goal is to experience things in baby steps and work up my confidence in myself and the boat gradually.

Of course, sea conditions can always be a bit of a surprise, so I watch the forecast very carefully and assume that the conditions will be worse than forecasted, leaving a margin for error. I also take into consideration that at this time the boat can likely take more than we can, so if we were to find ourselves in 10 foot seas instead of 5, we'd likely be fine. Especially since we have a liferaft and EPIRB.

But if I see a forecast of 5 to 8 foot seas at 9 seconds, I'm assuming I could easily run into 12 footers at 6 seconds and I'm staying home. 4 to 6 at 9 seconds, I would probably head out and feel things out.

Point is, I typically build a margin of safety for the unexpected, especially given my lack of experience.

As boaters gain more experience, they tend to operate at a narrower margin of safety (relative to a novice), or get lazy. My assumption, although I could be wrong, is that most accidents happen to very inexperienced, and very experienced boaters.
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Old 10-01-2017, 06:56 PM   #26
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Hi 4yanks! Some of my favorites are:
- Seven Miles an Hour (Don Wallace)
- Life's a Ditch (Charles Dougherty)
- Newlyweds Afloat (Felicia Schneiderhan)
- Leap of Faith: Quit you job and live on a boat
(Ed Robinson)
I also like the above list, plus:

Magazines are very good sources of well written stories.

Most books I've read by live aboard, world cruising sailors are pretty good. 90% of what they do is applicable to motor yachts.

I'd avoid videos and U-tube, unless you have time to waste.

Avoid How - To manuals until you can get hands-on practice.

Les Weatherritt's books about Crossing the Atlantic and Cruising around the Atlantic are wonderful books even if toy never get out of sight of land.
His sections about crewing, provisioning, weather and other things are OUTSTANDING.
Everyone should read his section in preparing the boat for bad weather.

Read books on subjects that you have no desire to ever do. That will add to your knowledge base and reinforce or reform your thinking. Remember, you don't know what you don't know.

Good luck.

Richard
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Old 10-02-2017, 07:33 PM   #27
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Book Recommendations

Richard,

Can you recommend any good marine weather books for dummies?

Asking for a friend...
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Old 10-02-2017, 07:53 PM   #28
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Two excellent books for land or sea bound use are Tristan Gooley's "How to Read Water" and "The Natural Navigator".. really wonderful in my opinion.

https://www.naturalnavigator.com/boh...ks-and-library
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Old 10-03-2017, 01:37 PM   #29
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Can you recommend any good marine weather books for dummies?
I haven't read this yet, but I just ran across this book:

https://smile.amazon.com/Reeds-Weath...ather+Handbook

and this companion website:

Frank Singleton's Weather and Sailing Pages - Franks-Weather - The Weather Window
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Old 10-03-2017, 02:56 PM   #30
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We used the Weather Identification Handbook. Pretty concise, written by the aptly named Storm Dunlop.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...ation_Handbook

Also, Chapman's has a very good section in it as well for weather.
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Old 10-04-2017, 09:06 AM   #31
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Richard,

Can you recommend any good marine weather books for dummies?

Asking for a friend...
The USA today Weather book is a good one.
Lots of graphics and understandable for the average person.

US Power Squadron also offers a good Wx course...largely based on the USA today book and other boating related topics.
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Old 10-04-2017, 10:24 AM   #32
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Based on one of the early posts, I ordered the Radar Book. In the first 5 pages I was already learning new stuff. Thanks for the suggestion.

Cheers, Bill
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Old 10-05-2017, 10:59 PM   #33
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Two excellent books for land or sea bound use are Tristan Gooley's "How to Read Water" and "The Natural Navigator".. really wonderful in my opinion.

https://www.naturalnavigator.com/boh...ks-and-library

Ordered How to Read Water on your recommendation and just started it today. Very interesting and enjoyable book so far. Thanks.
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Old 10-06-2017, 05:10 AM   #34
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Some friends are advising me on different aspects of the boat we are building. One of them said "and what are you doing for a liferaft?"

I replied that I wasn't going to get one until the first year we cruise to Alaska. That in WA/BC waters we aren't ever that far from land and surely we could make use of our tender. He was not impressed and told me to read a few books like this one:

https://www.amazon.com/Overboard-Blu...ords=overboard

Just finished it last night. Oy vey. Good for us to see what has happened to some other unfortunate (or poor planning) folks.
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Old 10-06-2017, 04:14 PM   #35
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I enjoyed voyaging under power By Robert Beebe/Leishman, 3rd edition. Beebe is considered by many to be the father of the trawler revolution.
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