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Old 09-14-2018, 05:03 PM   #21
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https://www.youtube.com/user/madsdahlke

I hope this is the right link. There is a YouTube channel called Sail Life the guy just did a complete peel and restoration of his whole he did a great and meticulous job it’s a great visual for what’s involved in this process
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Old 09-14-2018, 05:55 PM   #22
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Did he do a peel or just sand off the antifouling and gel coat?..... That's what it looked like to me....and he mentioned voids in the laminate but was waiting for an answer...what was it?

He did sound more educated on the process than the novice "blisters aren't a problem" type....

So like him, lots of research pays back huge dividends.... Not rrkying on the average forum post or boating rag....
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Old 09-14-2018, 06:02 PM   #23
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Did he do a peel or just sand off the antifouling and gel coat?..... That's what it looked like to me....and he mentioned voids in the laminate but was waiting for an answer...what was it?

He did sound more educated on the process than the novice "blisters aren't a problem" type....

So like him, lots of research pays back huge dividends.... Not rrkying on the average forum post or boating rag....


He applied a layer of mat all over and several in areas he took down farther. I got the feeling he had a few blisters and made sure he would not have to worry about them anymore. He puts a lot of research into it and gets sponsored as a result.
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Old 09-14-2018, 07:05 PM   #24
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This is the only way:

Anything else is wasting time and money.
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Old 09-14-2018, 07:09 PM   #25
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He applied a layer of mat all over and several in areas he took down farther. I got the feeling he had a few blisters and made sure he would not have to worry about them anymore. He puts a lot of research into it and gets sponsored as a result.
Mat is actually the worst thing to put on....but at least it was saturated with epoxy....at least I hope it was saturated for his sake.
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Old 09-14-2018, 07:10 PM   #26
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This is the only way:

Anything else is wasting time and money.
Actualoy the experts prefer grinding to ensure you get all the moisture and dekamination...peeling just makes reoairs eadier.
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Old 09-14-2018, 07:26 PM   #27
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Blister repair

In 1986 I bought a 1974 Ericson 32 sailboat. At the time everyone was talking about blisters so I bought a boat on the cheap because it had blisters like you are seeing. There was not one square foot without a blister. We bought her in September of that year, sailed her till January then pulled her after the super bowl. We ground off the gelcoat, ground out the blisters, rinsed then bagged the boat in plastic with dehumidifiers inside. Very hard work. There was a river of water that came out of that boat. Late April it was dry enough to do our epoxy repairs. Eight coats of West System epoxy and she was ready to float again. It took about 15 years for some blisters to appear. One or two on each haul out were handled easily. Would I do it again; no, not at my age. Would I pay someone to do it if I loved the boat. Yes for sure.
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Old 09-14-2018, 07:41 PM   #28
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A river of water suggests hydrolysis, not just blistering. Why the whole subject is misunderstood by so many.

Good job to get 15 years till the next blister.
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Old 09-15-2018, 10:06 AM   #29
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A river of water suggests hydrolysis, not just blistering. Why the whole subject is misunderstood by so many.

Good job to get 15 years till the next blister.
When we put her back in the water, she rode about 4" higher in the water.

Also, on a side note. The yard called me and asked if we could put her in the water as they needed my spot for another boat. I told them ok. They put her in the water without putting the knot meter plug back in. She almost sank to the bottom. Luckily my wife was there and started screaming. They came back and pumped the water out after we had floated oil our of the engine. Ugh. What a black ugly mess after having just fixed up the boat. I did get the engine cleaned out and it lasted another 12 or 14 years.
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Old 09-15-2018, 11:08 AM   #30
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The guy on sail life did a pretty comprehensive repair. He started by removing all the bottom paint. After that he used a heated vacuum mat to dry the hull. Next he peeled the hull and then reglassed as needed. All his glass work involved putting on at least one layer of 1708. In some places he put more on depending on the depth of his peel. All of his glass work was done with West System epoxy and he was careful to get full saturation and to remove all bubbles. Finally he faired the entire hull then applied six layers of west system with their barrier coat additive. Probably the best bottom job I have seen done, but it pales in comparison to the deck repair he did.
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Old 09-15-2018, 12:41 PM   #31
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I believe you are supposed to dry after peeling the hull. While gel coat is not a waterproof barrier, is still a barrier to moisture and greatly slows drying even with vacuum. Grinding is preferred to peeling as the grinder operator only stops when wetness and delamination is gone.

His job was similar to mine, I recovered with 6oz cloth after the deeper repairs of roving and cloth. Then a filler layer of epoxy, then finished with Interlux 2000 system.

Once your hull goes beyond simple blisters, it's rolling the dice to see how bad hydrolysis will get and how fast.
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Old 09-15-2018, 04:18 PM   #32
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I peeled instead of grinded. Pretty sure we got all the moisture out of the hull!
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Old 09-15-2018, 11:16 PM   #33
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Mat is actually the worst thing to put on....but at least it was saturated with epoxy....at least I hope it was saturated for his sake.
Please qualify your statement that mat is the worst thing. The only negative to mat with epoxy is that mat was designed to be used with polyester resin and epoxy doesn’t break down what holds it together unless that is out of date info. I always thought supposed to use woven with epoxy.
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Old 09-16-2018, 05:41 AM   #34
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Supposedly the strands in mat wick water deeper and faster because of the way it is made.

Maybe with epoxy, it not an issue or it just takes longer if its perfect layup....when is anything ever perfect?

Thats why boats are having these problems to begin with.

Read up on the who,e subject and you will repeatedly hear bad things about the use of mat in the construction...but Ivwill admit nothing or not much about its use in the repair.

I have just never heard or read of anyone using it in bottom repair.
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Old 09-16-2018, 06:14 AM   #35
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In most cases blisters do not require repair. In all cases repairs are very expensive in time and money and if not well done will not be durable.

In the older trawler world there are a lot of things someone can do to their boat to improve its reliability and utility for its intended use over the planned time of ownership other than repairing blisters. If one plans on keeping a boat for the long term and hull value relative to blister repair cost is high then it makes sense to preserve its value.
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Old 09-16-2018, 06:35 AM   #36
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The problem with "ignoring" blisters is you have no idea if you have a hydrolysis issue or not.

You can get away with not repairing blisters, but there is often way more to your hulls story.

Repairing at least a few and going deep enough gives you a better window of your hull's condition.

Hopefully you find little as most do and can just monitor.
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Old 09-16-2018, 06:36 AM   #37
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Please qualify your statement that mat is the worst thing. The only negative to mat with epoxy is that mat was designed to be used with polyester resin and epoxy doesn’t break down what holds it together unless that is out of date info. I always thought supposed to use woven with epoxy.
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Mat is comprised of millions of approximately 2" long strands. Multiply that by two for the number of wick end which will be sucking in water unless every single one is sealed to perfection (unlikely).
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Old 09-16-2018, 08:31 AM   #38
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The problem with "ignoring" blisters is you have no idea if you have a hydrolysis issue or not.

You can get away with not repairing blisters, but there is often way more to your hulls story.

Repairing at least a few and going deep enough gives you a better window of your hull's condition.

Hopefully you find little as most do and can just monitor.
Like massive delamination
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Old 09-16-2018, 09:48 AM   #39
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I pulled lage chunks of roving and thd mat between them off by hand in ond area of my boat... filled at least one trash can.

Till one does that and researches this issue way beyond the occasional blister repair article.... very little is usually known on the subject..
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