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Old 09-14-2018, 12:33 AM   #41
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I just use it for a part time live aboard and weekend cruiser.
Most I've used so far in one run. I'd like enough for a reasonable resale value though. This is a 2 mph boat.
Lol I meant 2 MPG^
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Old 09-14-2018, 01:05 AM   #42
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You may want to talk to Aero Tex Laboratories. They make liners to repair leaking fuel tanks. You can read about the process here: http://atlinc.com/atl-marine-fuel-bl...tallation.html

These are not the typical pillow shaped tanks. They are made to the shape of your existing tank.
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Old 09-14-2018, 05:36 AM   #43
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I used 56 gallon poly tanks. Off the shelf for around $300 a piece. Gives me a range of over 300 miles and LOTS more storage room in the engine room.

They have up to a 126 gallon square footprint, off the shelf tanks.
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Old 09-14-2018, 05:53 AM   #44
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You may want to talk to Aero Tex Laboratories. They make liners to repair leaking fuel tanks. You can read about the process here: http://atlinc.com/atl-marine-fuel-bl...tallation.html

These are not the typical pillow shaped tanks. They are made to the shape of your existing tank.
I'll have to send them my measurements for a price quote. Anyone used them before and could give me a ball park?
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Old 09-14-2018, 06:08 AM   #45
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Someone did suggest this idea to me a while ago... I'm not sure exactly how it would work since the working space on the backside of the tank is so limited. I might cut the metal down 6" for better access if I go this route


Iím suggesting laying up the FRP from inside the existing tank, not outside. So only interior access required, which from the pictures you seem to have?
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Old 09-14-2018, 07:55 AM   #46
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From a marine engineer friend....

"I wonder if any of the proponents of bladders give any thought to the fact that it is absolutely necessary to completely clean and mechanically "polish" the interior surfaces so that there are no points of abrasion that will puncture the bladder walls after a period of operation. Since the access required to adequately prepare for a bladder install means cutting large access ports in the tank and complete cleaning and gas freeing you may as well crop out the corroded section of the top and bolt on a new section. Since the interior has to be cleaned anyway, it would be a perfect time and in condition to use an aviation grade tank sealer top bottom and sides. "
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Old 09-14-2018, 12:30 PM   #47
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Lol I meant 2 MPG^
Last time I heard some say they had a 2mph boat boat they were referring to it being a dock queen and the marina current was 2mph.
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Old 09-15-2018, 05:49 AM   #48
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Iím suggesting laying up the FRP from inside the existing tank, not outside. So only interior access required, which from the pictures you seem to have?
I worry about attaching the lid along the outer edge of the tank with this route.
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Old 09-15-2018, 07:34 AM   #49
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It is very difficult to glass UP, overhead , esp with epoxy that is slow curing.


Not much fun with polly either , but doable.
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Old 09-15-2018, 07:45 AM   #50
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It is very difficult to glass UP, overhead , esp with epoxy that is slow curing.


Not much fun with polly either , but doable.
I can imagine
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Old 09-15-2018, 09:57 PM   #51
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I have a different opinion than most here. I think you should cut out and remove the original tanks from inside. Clean sand and paint the area they are occupying, build removable supports to secure new custom bladder tanks to fit in the area that was previously occupied by the fuel tanks. You can get bladder tanks custom made in any custom shape, and they can baffle them. I think they put an open cell fuel proof foam inside of them like a fuel cell in a race car. If you do a nice job of it, I doubt it would reduce the value of the boat. If you need to clean them, repair damage on the hull, inspect, need more room during engine work, etc. You can just pump out all the fuel and remove them from the boat. I think this would be a super sweet setup.
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Old 09-15-2018, 10:16 PM   #52
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I have a different opinion than most here. I think you should cut out and remove the original tanks from inside. Clean sand and paint the area they are occupying, build removable supports to secure new custom bladder tanks to fit in the area that was previously occupied by the fuel tanks. You can get bladder tanks custom made in any custom shape, and they can baffle them. I think they put an open cell fuel proof foam inside of them like a fuel cell in a race car. If you do a nice job of it, I doubt it would reduce the value of the boat. If you need to clean them, repair damage on the hull, inspect, need more room during engine work, etc. You can just pump out all the fuel and remove them from the boat. I think this would be a super sweet setup.
I like that idea. No need to leave the rusty old tank. ATL makes that type of tank as well. The foam would baffle the fuel and keep it from sloshing around. In gasoline tanks it prevents the foam prevents explosions. It slows the flame front.
http://atlinc.com/marine.html
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Old 09-16-2018, 02:16 AM   #53
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I have a different opinion than most here. I think you should cut out and remove the original tanks from inside. Clean sand and paint the area they are occupying, build removable supports to secure new custom bladder tanks to fit in the area that was previously occupied by the fuel tanks. You can get bladder tanks custom made in any custom shape, and they can baffle them. I think they put an open cell fuel proof foam inside of them like a fuel cell in a race car. If you do a nice job of it, I doubt it would reduce the value of the boat. If you need to clean them, repair damage on the hull, inspect, need more room during engine work, etc. You can just pump out all the fuel and remove them from the boat. I think this would be a super sweet setup.
This is definitely a possibility. Others here and locally have said it's a waste of money because of the reduction in boat value.
I'm not sure. If I have a boat with these vs unknown steel I'd probably feel a little bit better.
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Old 09-16-2018, 06:46 AM   #54
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You've been given lots of ideas. It seems to me that you should get some estimates. I would first get an estimated value of the boat with good tanks. I would get an estimate for 2 new aluminum fuel tanks and the cost to remove the 2 engines and generator if necessary, if you can't do the work yourself. Replacing the tanks with aluminum ones will give you the highest resale value (better than the original steel tanks). You then need to decide if the cost is justifiable to the value of the boat.

If you choose not to go with aluminum tanks, you need to realize that all the other options will likely greatly reduce the value of your boat and may prevent you from selling it for a reasonable price. Remember, you may be able to find a buyer, but ultimately it will be the surveyor and the buyer's insurance company that will be the final word.

The last consideration is your own insurance company. If you have to change companies or yours requires an insurance survey, you might find them unwilling to insure your solution. There have been some probably very viable alternative solutions offered. But, when it no longer looks like an original fuel tank, the scrutiny will begin. While I'm not familiar with your boat, I'm gathering from the thread it's maybe 30 years old. As boats get older, there are fewer companies willing to insure them. This may just give them the reason to say no. A failed bladder with 100 gallons of diesel being discharged by a bilge pump, could be a huge environmental liability.

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Old 09-16-2018, 06:49 AM   #55
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My boat hit 30 this year and on the required self survey, they specifically asked if the tanks we're original.
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Old 09-16-2018, 02:01 PM   #56
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You've been given lots of ideas. It seems to me that you should get some estimates. I would first get an estimated value of the boat with good tanks. I would get an estimate for 2 new aluminum fuel tanks and the cost to remove the 2 engines and generator if necessary, if you can't do the work yourself. Replacing the tanks with aluminum ones will give you the highest resale value (better than the original steel tanks). You then need to decide if the cost is justifiable to the value of the boat.

If you choose not to go with aluminum tanks, you need to realize that all the other options will likely greatly reduce the value of your boat and may prevent you from selling it for a reasonable price. Remember, you may be able to find a buyer, but ultimately it will be the surveyor and the buyer's insurance company that will be the final word.

The last consideration is your own insurance company. If you have to change companies or yours requires an insurance survey, you might find them unwilling to insure your solution. There have been some probably very viable alternative solutions offered. But, when it no longer looks like an original fuel tank, the scrutiny will begin. While I'm not familiar with your boat, I'm gathering from the thread it's maybe 30 years old. As boats get older, there are fewer companies willing to insure them. This may just give them the reason to say no. A failed bladder with 100 gallons of diesel being discharged by a bilge pump, could be a huge environmental liability.

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It's 40 years old and my insurance company probably doesn't care. It's liability only.
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Old 09-16-2018, 02:38 PM   #57
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Moeller is the big name in plastic diesel tanks...any other manufacturers?
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Old 09-17-2018, 08:44 PM   #58
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Once I read far enough into this book to understand you are a DIYer, I thought my experience in assisting with the replacement of the fuel tanks in a twin-engine (Ford Lehman 90s) 37-foot trawler. The two 250-gal tanks outboard of the engines were replaced with four aluminum tanks occupying the same footprint as the originals. While the my friend the owner did not do so, I would have placed a valve in the large diameter hoses connecting the bottoms of the two pairs of tanks.

Here's how we did it while the boat was IN THE WATER:

Remove all the main cabin engine room hatches.
Using three guys, we rigged a wooden gallows in the main cabin and lifted one engine/tranny with several come-alongs. We swayed it over top of the other engine and rested it on 4X4 timbers stretched full length of the cabin.
Using a bunch of Sawzall blades, cut out the old tank in pieces.
After cleaning up and repainting the area, we easily placed the two new tanks on that side.
Lowered the engine back into place and then repeated the process for the other side of the boat.

Costs? Some lumber, come-alongs, tank manufacture (the biggie), hoses, valves, Sawzall blades.
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Old 09-17-2018, 09:51 PM   #59
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Can you find any references to this procedure? Or know of a yard who's done it? I'd like to get an idea of what this would cost to get it professionally done.
I'm a DIYr but cutting the side of the hull would be beyond my limitations.
Check locally, Iím in the PACNW.

Look for a yard with a strong fiberglass department along with a good mechanical department.

This is not a DYI job, at least the cutting and repairing the fiberglass part.
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Old 09-17-2018, 09:57 PM   #60
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Originally Posted by rgano View Post
Once I read far enough into this book to understand you are a DIYer, I thought my experience in assisting with the replacement of the fuel tanks in a twin-engine (Ford Lehman 90s) 37-foot trawler. The two 250-gal tanks outboard of the engines were replaced with four aluminum tanks occupying the same footprint as the originals. While the my friend the owner did not do so, I would have placed a valve in the large diameter hoses connecting the bottoms of the two pairs of tanks.

Here's how we did it while the boat was IN THE WATER:

Remove all the main cabin engine room hatches.
Using three guys, we rigged a wooden gallows in the main cabin and lifted one engine/tranny with several come-alongs. We swayed it over top of the other engine and rested it on 4X4 timbers stretched full length of the cabin.
Using a bunch of Sawzall blades, cut out the old tank in pieces.
After cleaning up and repainting the area, we easily placed the two new tanks on that side.
Lowered the engine back into place and then repeated the process for the other side of the boat.

Costs? Some lumber, come-alongs, tank manufacture (the biggie), hoses, valves, Sawzall blades.
I like it, I would love to see this "wooden gallows" rig.
I wonder how much that saves over having a forklift do it at a yard, assuming the boat must come out this year for other maintenance anyway.
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