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Old 12-22-2020, 03:36 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by tdoriot View Post
That Cathlamet Sternwheeler could be a great $ 5,000.00 boat if someone put a half a million in it!
$5000? offer $2,000 but only if you are very serious.

It might take you a month+ to get rid of all the crap inside the boat and put thing right.

We are not sure, the boat is actually floating. Could be resting on the bottom.
We know the engine(s) need massive amounts of attention. Without an out of the water survey, we have no idea how much hull work it needed.
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Old 12-22-2020, 03:54 PM   #62
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I'm very happy with my old trawler. Not a new "sexy" design but tough as nails, ex commercial equipment that will out live me and does everything I want to do and more.

My only warning for those not looking at a common production boat is ensure your purchase can be insured. Many odd selections can tick so many uninsurable boxes to make this process difficult:

> 30 years old;
"Custom" design;
Ex commercial use;
DIY fitout?

Insurers like familiarity. 😁
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Old 12-22-2020, 03:57 PM   #63
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One piece of advice and then I will sit back and read.

NO WOODEN HULL BOATS

End of my advice.
Alexa. Tell Dan Bah Humbug.
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Old 12-22-2020, 04:02 PM   #64
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Alexa. Tell Dan Bah Humbug.
Nonsence advice. A lot of people might not know this, but wooden boats have even sailed around the world! Some have even rounded the horn!
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Old 12-22-2020, 04:05 PM   #65
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Best advise you’ll ever get, period.
Alexa tell GC bah humbug
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Old 12-22-2020, 04:06 PM   #66
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I've learned a lot from buying my last two major boats as "fixer uppers."

First, I became confident in my own skills as I learned more and more out of necessity. Second, I became more comfortable with "good enough" (with an emphasis on safety and reliability) as opposed to wanting everything to be perfect.

Sure, you spend money. ALL boats require this, but a thrifty person can learn how get out into the same anchorages as the guys who pay yacht club prices for their boats and their maintenance. The new handrails on my boat are galvanized pipe painted black. Quite un-yachtie, but...she's a retired fishing boat! It all works, it's solid, I could easily do it myself, and it didn't cost an arm and a leg. I'm going to enjoy doing some fancywork on them with half hitching and cockscombing as we enjoy a quiet anchorage next summer.

Even the guys on the wooden boat forums, formerly bastions of traditionalism, will admit that you really don't need to break open the piggy bank for exotic hardwoods and marine ply. Why, they're even getting comfortable with PLASTIC framing that will never rot! And with using sealants from the big box store rather than the chandlery!

I got a great deal on ballast lead at a sailboat recycling yard, on surplus rope from a guy who used to own a marine supply place, on aluminum stock for my mast from a local metal recycler.

Along the way I learned...self-taught thanks to YouTube and other sources...how to weld stainless and aluminum, how to wire a generic transducer, how to repack a stuffing box while in the water, how to replace seals in a hydraulic steering system, how to make an Arduino anemometer, how to get GPS and AIS data on my laptop, and lots of other fun and useful skills. It's been frustrating and dirty and painful, and rewarding and satisfying and confidence-building.

It's not for everyone, but there are plenty of ways of getting out on the water that don't involve prohibitive expense.
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Old 12-22-2020, 07:52 PM   #67
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You guys are the best. This is the exact information and tips I was looking for to put my mind at ease and just enjoy my future journey. What ever I end up owning will be a combination of lots of labor and lots of enjoyment.
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Old 12-22-2020, 07:56 PM   #68
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Originally Posted by GoneFarrell View Post
Here 'ya go...

https://portland.craigslist.org/grg/...246802923.html

If that's too much dinero, there's this (but it needs a wench!)..
https://bend.craigslist.org/zip/d/be...247203235.html
Not a stern wheel but I have seen 2 of the same design. They take charters each summer. They may even be TF'ers
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Old 12-22-2020, 08:13 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
$5000? offer $2,000 but only if you are very serious.

It might take you a month+ to get rid of all the crap inside the boat and put thing right.

We are not sure, the boat is actually floating. Could be resting on the bottom.
We know the engine(s) need massive amounts of attention. Without an out of the water survey, we have no idea how much hull work it needed.
I drove past this gem last weekend. It looks better in the pictures.
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Old 12-22-2020, 08:20 PM   #70
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Youre discounting your time and labor, many wouldnt do that. There is also the 'opportunity cost' for many people. With that same time and labor they might easily have earned way more than the money you figure you saved.
Let's see....work more overtime...or head to the Marina to "work" on the trawler...��. I get excited every time I free up enough time to head down there. Can't escape work fast enough. If I didn't have the trawler I'd be tinkering in my workshop on some other BS. Might as well be a trawler. ��
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Old 12-22-2020, 09:44 PM   #71
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The secret to wood boats is staying ahead of the maintenance, not behind. Once you get behind it get expensive.
I liveaboard and cruise a 1942 Wheeler, wood.
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Old 12-22-2020, 10:36 PM   #72
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Originally Posted by Lepke View Post
The secret to wood boats is staying ahead of the maintenance, not behind. Once you get behind it get expensive.
I liveaboard and cruise a 1942 Wheeler, wood.
When young on New England waters I was always enamored of Wheelers. Still am!! Could you post a photo? For years on TF I've been looking forward to see yours. Forgive me if I missed an already posted picture.

Happy Holidays!!

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Old 12-23-2020, 10:15 AM   #73
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No doubt there are better ways to make money. I don't do the work on my boat to save money. I actually enjoy it. The engine dealer offered to replace my damper plate under warranty. I declined the offer for labor and installed it myself.

Doing my own repairs and upgrades allows me to know the boat intimately. If there are any problems at sea, troubleshooting is much easier when you've crawled over and under every inch of the boat.


Yes, this way when something breaks, you instantly recognize the nuanced sound/rattle/shimy or shake. Instead of laying in bed all night wondering if you might have a problem, you can just go to bed n the knowledge that getting a good nights rest is the ONLY thing to do as not only is the damn thing broke, but you already had it somewhere on the list to order new gaskets and a rebuild kit which are definitely not onboard without even looking.
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Old 12-23-2020, 11:07 AM   #74
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No doubt there are better ways to make money. I don't do the work on my boat to save money. I actually enjoy it. The engine dealer offered to replace my damper plate under warranty. I declined the offer for labor and installed it myself.

Doing my own repairs and upgrades allows me to know the boat intimately. If there are any problems at sea, troubleshooting is much easier when you've crawled over and under every inch of the boat.

This is me as well. Most of the time I enjoy working on my boat, which for me includes keeping it looking nice. I do almost everything myself, but occasionally call in a pro. Sometimes I do a better job than the pros would do, sometimes I don't.



Either way I learn something every time I do the job and I feel a lot more comfortable on our boat in remote places than I would if I paid someone to do everything because of all the labor I've poured into it. I guess others would say that having the boat "professionally maintained" makes it more reliable, and that's valid too.
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Old 12-23-2020, 11:44 AM   #75
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This is me as well. Most of the time I enjoy working on my boat, which for me includes keeping it looking nice. I do almost everything myself, but occasionally call in a pro. Sometimes I do a better job than the pros would do, sometimes I don't.


Either way I learn something every time I do the job and I feel a lot more comfortable on our boat in remote places than I would if I paid someone to do everything because of all the labor I've poured into it. I guess others would say that having the boat "professionally maintained" makes it more reliable, and that's valid too.
I agree. In addition, I keep finding that getting someone out for a small one-off job is such a massive PITA that it's faster to just do it myself. Nobody wants to come do a one or two-hour job; I find it takes multiple calls, endless re-schedules, etc. Most good boat guys here in San Diego seem to have enough business from people spending big $$ that it's just not worth their time.

Typical response to my call: "I'm booked for the next three weeks. Call me then." Or, "I'll try to come out sometime next week once I'm finished with this job." This almost never results in any work being done.

One nice thing about having a semi-trashy trawler is that if you screw something up you aren't immediately going to hell.
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Old 12-23-2020, 12:04 PM   #76
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If you have skills similar to sbman then I am all for picking up a trashy trawler and making her a labor of love. In the end sbman will have a like new boat for half the cost of new. He will have spent more than if he picked up a nice newer boat but even a nice newer boat will need maintenance. Were sbman will excell is in knowing his boat. He will always know exactly what it takes do deal with any issues. The only real risk I see for sbman is the risk of losing his health before he gets a chance to use his boat. This is the problem in life. There is no one answer that fits all.
There's a risk for loss of health for anyone at any point, we are never guaranteed tomorrow.

I don't see the refit as not using the boat. I'm not boating, but I'm definitely using the boat. I enjoy the refit process and I enjoy the accomplishment and learning that it brings. Instead of spending my leisure time with some form of entertainment, I enjoy the process of refitting. If I didn't enjoy it, I would have saved up money and bought a boat that was ready to use. Not that I enjoy every moment of it, some of it is hard work, but the net result is something I'm happy with.

I've always had a project, whether it was a major home remodel or rebuilding engines in cars/trucks/airplanes, or restoring a motorcycle, the boat is no different, when it is ready I'll go boating.
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Old 12-23-2020, 12:23 PM   #77
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Regarding working on your own boat, of course that has to be good, from several angles already mentioned. But originally the thread was about fixer upers, as opposed to boats in great shape. For some, worth it , for others not, especially for guys with less skills , but more money. What about this scenario: some guys have the money to buy a brand new boat, but have few skills. Lets say theyre old, and its a bucket list thing to spend say 10 years roaming around the world. So considering the boat is brand new, how much work do you really think will be needed to be done? I done think too much, especially not major stuff.
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Old 12-23-2020, 12:35 PM   #78
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Sure there is the entire spectrum...


But fixer uppers don't always cost a lot or take a lot of work...depends what level you choose to restore them to if at all other than a wash and get them running.


The OP asked "So I guess what i'm trying to say is there any Trawlers out there that look like crap but have good internals?"....the answer I see as usual is ...."maybe" or "it depends"..... it's not "it's a bad idea".
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Old 12-23-2020, 12:55 PM   #79
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The OP asked "So I guess what i'm trying to say is there any Trawlers out there that look like crap but have good internals?"....the answer I see as usual is ...."maybe" or "it depends"..... it's not "it's a bad idea".
I think I'd weigh in on the side of "it's a bad idea". I do think that the more people use their boats the more likely the "internals" are good, so you can find marina queens that have been washed every week and sparkle but every single piece of rubber is stiff and cracking. Our boat is "worn" - the interior varnish needs to be redone, there are lots of screw holes everywhere... but if you go down to the engine room the hoses are all new, wiring is (now) recent and safe.

But I don't think our boat "looks like crap". If it really looks like crap, I think you're almost guaranteed an endless list of more serious problems.
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Old 12-23-2020, 01:19 PM   #80
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I think I'd weigh in on the side of "it's a bad idea". I do think that the more people use their boats the more likely the "internals" are good, so you can find marina queens that have been washed every week and sparkle but every single piece of rubber is stiff and cracking. Our boat is "worn" - the interior varnish needs to be redone, there are lots of screw holes everywhere... but if you go down to the engine room the hoses are all new, wiring is (now) recent and safe.

But I don't think our boat "looks like crap". If it really looks like crap, I think you're almost guaranteed an endless list of more serious problems.

That still doesn't mean it's a bad idea to buy, repair and use.



As you say a chunk is what some of us here own...probably got into trawlers with a fixer-uper.


There are some that are past anything but running into the ground...but other really poor ones may be fine for making clean and serviceable for local cruising.


Some here may not buy some boats of owners here because of their condition....yet have been cruised quite a bit..... different strokes.....
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