Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-24-2022, 02:14 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
City: Toronto
Vessel Name: Ava
Vessel Model: Cruisers Yachts 3075
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 25
Advise please.

With much help from the forum I have brought the mechanical side of the boat to a good place - until the next thing goes wrong lol.

Now I'd like to improve the cosmetics, and have three areas I would like to start on.

1. As you can see the paint has flaked off the grab bar on the radar arch. I'm assuming the bar is aluminum? If so, is the process to chip off all the paint, sand and repaint? Should I use any particular type of paint?

2. A friend, who is now abroad and out of touch, rebed the stanchion bases, and in the process left those ugly black marks which I assume is sealant of some kind. What should I use to clean that up without damaging the gelcoat?

3. In the third set of pics you can see the black scuff marks, the edges of which are just noticeable to the touch. There are quite a lot of these, the ones in the pic being the worst. What is the best solution to this problem?

Thanks in advance for suggestions, much appreciated
Attached Thumbnails
Grab bar.jpg   Grab bar 2.jpg   rebed base.jpg   scuff 1.jpg   scuff 2.jpg  

TorronaPwr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 04:56 PM   #2
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 9,531
I could be wrong but that looks like the gelcoat is cracking and falling off. I am hope I am wrong.

Per the black, start with acetone and cloth. Perhaps someone else has a better solution. Dont rub too fast or you might break through the gelcoat.
You might try some fine rubbing compound.
Dont use scouring power.

Per the hand rail.... remove it if possible, strip to bare metal, primer it and repaint it.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 05:28 PM   #3
Guru
 
kthoennes's Avatar
 
City: Sioux Falls, South Dakota
Vessel Name: Xanadu
Vessel Model: Mainship 37 Motor Yacht
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,995
I'll be very interested in the answers to #1 because I have the same issue. My radar arch is all welded aluminum pipe and the white paint is flaking off in a few spots just like that. I was going to sand then steel-wool the edges of the chipped areas and re-paint with a good enamel, but maybe there's a better, more durable way. I'd really like to remove the whole thing and have it sandblasted and powder coated but that's just not practical and nobody sees it up there anyway -- except I know those chipped areas are up there and it bugs me.
kthoennes is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 05:57 PM   #4
Guru
 
KnotYet's Avatar
 
City: Los Angeles
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 815
Aluminum poses a special problem in getting the paint to adhere to bare metal.
My last boat had an aluminum house and I had it painted with 2-part LP paint.
We always prepped it with Alodyne which chemically converts the metal surface.
I never had a problem with the paint peeling or failing to adhere.
__________________
Science doesn't care what you believe. -Neil deGrasse Tyson
KnotYet is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 06:37 PM   #5
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Black Dog
Vessel Model: Formula 41PC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 15,794
Quote:
Originally Posted by kthoennes View Post
I'll be very interested in the answers to #1 because I have the same issue. My radar arch is all welded aluminum pipe and the white paint is flaking off in a few spots just like that. I was going to sand then steel-wool the edges of the chipped areas and re-paint with a good enamel, but maybe there's a better, more durable way. I'd really like to remove the whole thing and have it sandblasted and powder coated but that's just not practical and nobody sees it up there anyway -- except I know those chipped areas are up there and it bugs me.
Donít use steel wool. It will leave minute particles of steel in the metal and then rust.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you arenít one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 06:44 PM   #6
Guru
 
Dougcole's Avatar
 
City: Carrabelle, FL
Vessel Name: Morgan
Vessel Model: '05 Mainship 40T
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,992
Quote:
Originally Posted by KnotYet View Post
Aluminum poses a special problem in getting the paint to adhere to bare metal.
My last boat had an aluminum house and I had it painted with 2-part LP paint.
We always prepped it with Alodyne which chemically converts the metal surface.
I never had a problem with the paint peeling or failing to adhere.

This.


I'm in the ongoing process of repainting my aluminum doors and window frames as needed. It is important to treat the metal before you prime and paint.


Acid wash, Alodyne (or similar), then two part epoxy primer and paint (I'm using awl grip) is the method I have been using. It's a lot of work but looks nice and hopefully will hold up.


Doug
Dougcole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 06:56 PM   #7
Guru
 
tiltrider1's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Vessel Name: AZZURRA
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 54
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 3,103
I hate repainting aluminum. It’s a process that is to lengthy for me to go into here.

As for the black marks. I would buy 3 products. A cleaner wax, a polishing wax and a restoration compound formally known as rubbing compound. Start with the clearer, it is the least aggressive, if it doesn’t do the job try the polishing wax, if necessary progress to the restoration compound.
tiltrider1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 07:03 PM   #8
Guru
 
Simi 60's Avatar
 
City: Queensland
Vessel Model: Milkraft 60 converted timber prawn trawler
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 4,237
Painting ally properly is a huge multi coating process if doing it right and even then, if the surface is compromised it leads to bubbling and flaking.
Powder coating is the same.

Now, i'm a firm believer in unpainted aluminium or at most, acid wash and clear tectyl.
Used to use it when building masts.

A bit late for you now.
Good luck with it.
__________________
Everything on a boat is broken, you just don't know it yet
Full time cruising is repairing boats in exotic locations
Simi 60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 07:46 PM   #9
Veteran Member
 
City: Toronto
Vessel Name: Ava
Vessel Model: Cruisers Yachts 3075
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 25
Thanks everyone for the speedy replies. I have a place to start with the aluminum handle and the stanchion base marks.

Any thoughts on the scuffs? Does it look like it has gone deeper than the gelcoat. By the way, how deep is an average gelcoat?
TorronaPwr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 08:13 PM   #10
TF Site Team
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Vessel Name: Black Dog
Vessel Model: Formula 41PC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 15,794
Quote:
Originally Posted by TorronaPwr View Post
Thanks everyone for the speedy replies. I have a place to start with the aluminum handle and the stanchion base marks.

Any thoughts on the scuffs? Does it look like it has gone deeper than the gelcoat. By the way, how deep is an average gelcoat?
20 mils usually.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you arenít one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 08:15 PM   #11
TF Site Team
 
Bacchus's Avatar
 
City: Seneca Lake NY
Vessel Name: Bacchus
Vessel Model: MS 34 HT Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 6,470
For black marks Id try acetone as mentioned or Colinite cleaner. I've had good luck with the cleaner as a gel coat prep for wax or polymer and it has removed some stubborn stains... worth a try as it improves the gloss in the process.

If the other scuffs are surface I'd try the same and add a mild compound if necessary for both. if they are digs then you will need to fill w/ gel coat.
__________________
Don
2008 MS 34 HT Trawler
"Bacchus"
Bacchus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 08:18 PM   #12
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 9,531
IF you elect to use 'wool', use bronze wool and not steel wool. Little flex will remain on deck and rust over night.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2022, 08:20 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Flatswing's Avatar
 
City: Windmill Harbour, Hilton Head Island, SC
Vessel Name: River Girl
Vessel Model: 2004 DeFever 49 RPH
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 401
Quote:
Originally Posted by TorronaPwr View Post
Thanks everyone for the speedy replies. I have a place to start with the aluminum handle and the stanchion base marks.

Any thoughts on the scuffs? Does it look like it has gone deeper than the gelcoat. By the way, how deep is an average gelcoat?
1st step on any scuff marks should be magic eraser pad (just a fine abrasive really). Second step, if needed could be an Oxalic acid based stain remover (Bar keepers friend, Y10, gel, FSR (Fiberglass stain remover) gel, 3rd step acetone, after that, if deeply embedded, you may be regelcoating.
Flatswing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2022, 06:29 AM   #14
TF Site Team
 
Bacchus's Avatar
 
City: Seneca Lake NY
Vessel Name: Bacchus
Vessel Model: MS 34 HT Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 6,470
Usually with gel coat refurb I have read about the most aggressive step used is very fine wet - dry used wet followed by decreasing aggressive compounds.
I would tend to stay with accepted & proven abrasives processes if the solvent approach doesn't "cut it"
__________________
Don
2008 MS 34 HT Trawler
"Bacchus"
Bacchus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2022, 08:06 AM   #15
Guru
 
mvweebles's Avatar
 
City: Saint Petersburg
Vessel Name: Weebles
Vessel Model: 1970 Willard 36 Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 3,865
As a first step on the scuff marks, try Barkeeper's Friend in the household cleaner's aisle at grocery store. Very mild abrassive and oxalyx acid. Hopefully available in Canada. The stuff is pretty magical on many things boat-related.

Peter
__________________
M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Trawler
mvweebles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2022, 09:51 AM   #16
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,370
Greetings,
Mr. TP. As suggested, try a "benign" solvent first in the marks around the stanchions/fittings. My go to, in order of attempts, is usually: Rubbing alcohol, acetone, xylene/xylol, lacquer thinner. Since any of these solvents can be the wrong thing to use on some materials I try a very small test spot first. I think they're all OK with gelcoat.

I suspect the marks are residual material your AWOL friend used to bed the stanchions. Hopefully he did NOT use silicone. On magnification of the stanchion photo it appears it may be the dreaded Devils goop (silicone). For your sake, I hope it is not.
IF it IS silicone, strike that person OFF your Christmas list and never talk to them again! Send them to Coventry.



Regarding the scuff marks: I would try my solvent group although IF the gelcoat IS damaged (scratched) you will have to go with the abrasives. Again, using the least aggressive first.


Can't help you with the Al bits.
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2022, 10:29 AM   #17
Veteran Member
 
City: New England/Michigan
Vessel Name: N/A
Vessel Model: N/A
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 94
Please br advised that sanding aluminum will create more problems down the road by encouraging lots of corrosive oxide deposits and pitting. Aluminum creates a protective oxide surface layer that left alone prevents most corrosive activity except galvanic. This is the reason many workboats built from 5000 series aluminum are left bare without problems other that aesthetics. Sanding removes this protective coating. In fact the same principals are utilized in anodizing which in fact is a process that generates a thicker oxide layer most often tinted or colored. The stuff is very hard and is in fact a ceramic in type II & III class processes.

If you can take it down and find an anodizing shop or perhaps powder coating you’ll be way better off. Otherwise locate strontium chromate primer and follow the prep etch directions and paint. Zinc chromate will also work as a good base and primer however many of the companies have, or are, dropping it due to EPA pressure. Do not sand and good luck

BTW I doubt your mast is gelcoated as polyester has a terrible time bonding to aluminum and I’ve never heard of it being done. Take a chip and burn it if it smokes black it could be polyester.
Rick
garbler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2022, 11:48 AM   #18
Veteran Member
 
City: Toronto
Vessel Name: Ava
Vessel Model: Cruisers Yachts 3075
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 25
This is such a valuable forum, especially when tackling new job arenas! Thanks to everyone who contributed, I've copied out all the suggestions and will use them to plan my work
TorronaPwr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2022, 01:48 PM   #19
Guru
 
kthoennes's Avatar
 
City: Sioux Falls, South Dakota
Vessel Name: Xanadu
Vessel Model: Mainship 37 Motor Yacht
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,995
Oh boy. If you total up all the chipped areas on the entire radar arch pipes it probably totals one square foot, but it's mostly spots as big as a thumb-print. Looks a lot like the OP's initial photo. And the chipping is probably where they used a cherry picker (and steel cable slings instead of nylon straps? ) to lift off the radar arch and put it back on. Or pressure points where the radar dome and GPS and antenna brackets are cinched around the pipe. And it's purely cosmetic. Maybe I just have to live with chipped paint up there. I'm beginning to think my to-do list is too long.
kthoennes is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2022, 06:32 AM   #20
TF Site Team
 
Bacchus's Avatar
 
City: Seneca Lake NY
Vessel Name: Bacchus
Vessel Model: MS 34 HT Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 6,470
If it is dreaded Silicone as RTF mentions I have had good results using very fine wet-dry wet to remove it.
__________________
Don
2008 MS 34 HT Trawler
"Bacchus"
Bacchus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012