Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-14-2017, 08:59 AM   #201
Guru
 
Bigsfish's Avatar
 
City: Miami River
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Gotcha
Vessel Model: Grand Banks. Heritage. 54
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 2,743
You'll never get a straighter road with practically no traffic, just watch out for gators heading across the road. A friend of mine hit one in his Vett, he lived but totaled the vehicle. It was a mess.
__________________
Advertisement

Bigsfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2017, 10:00 AM   #202
Veteran Member
 
Stickman's Avatar
 
City: Charleston
Country: US
Vessel Name: THIRD CHILD
Vessel Model: KADEY KROGEN 48AE
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 98
I had Two audi/vw diesels turned in. Although the settlement was reasonable- a judgemade them do it. Less convinced VW/Audi would have done so on their own accord.

I find peace, happiness, and delight at all speeds but enjoy my surroundings the most at < 10 knots.
__________________

Stickman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2017, 10:15 AM   #203
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 10,037
Quote:
Originally Posted by smitty477 View Post
It was never possible to really run a car out very long or safely if you had one that could reasonably perform. Around here we run the cars at National speedway, Limerock or Bridgehampton (until it was closed). You get a completely different feel when you are at a track where there is no reason to hold back and the cars there make yours look sloooow. It is very fun and it is very humbling to see what a car can do when really prepared for going fast.
Of course my 50 yr. [1/2 Century] old, 4,500 lb., 1967 "Luxo-Muscle-Car" Wildcat is slow compared others....

However - This land-yacht-beast with power everything, AC and comfortable seating for six can do 0 to 60 in in just under 6 seconds... with 1/8 tank gas and spare tire removed from tank. Also, acceleration in passing gear from 50 to 75 mph is impressive while she keeps roaring ever more powerfully to and including past 100 + mph.

As to where I take my old Cat baby through her paces: We Live in the Country! There is a nearly two mile mile straight stretch of really good condition two lane pavement that is just three minutes from our house. We most often drive on it to get to home or when leaving our area. Often there is not one vehicle in sight. Matter of fact, for the purpose of street rod races, there is a designated 1/4 mile marker and 1 mile marker on that straight, level, good condition stretch of road. Like I said - "We Live in the Country!"

We do greatly enjoy our 50 yr. [1/2 Century] old, 4,500 lb., 1967 "Luxo-Muscle-Car" Wildcat!! Often "Sunday Drives" are taken. Although others exist... There are none others we've seen on the road since purchasing her in 1998. She's a Very recognizable "Class Act Automobile"!
Art is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2017, 10:20 AM   #204
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 20,765
Heck, had my dads stock 1970 or so Delta 88 with the 455 in it to 109 mph. It was still accelerating with a full tank of gas an 5 big guys in it.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2017, 10:36 AM   #205
Guru
 
City: Northport
Country: USA
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,522
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art View Post
Of course my 50 yr. [1/2 Century] old, 4,500 lb., 1967 "Luxo-Muscle-Car" Wildcat is slow compared others....

However - This land-yacht-beast with power everything, AC and comfortable seating for six can do 0 to 60 in in just under 6 seconds... with 1/8 tank gas and spare tire removed from tank. Also, acceleration in passing gear from 50 to 75 mph is impressive while she keeps roaring ever more powerfully to and including past 100 + mph.

As to where I take my old Cat baby through her paces: We Live in the Country! There is a nearly two mile mile straight stretch of really good condition two lane pavement that is just three minutes from our house. We most often drive on it to get to home or when leaving our area. Often there is not one vehicle in sight. Matter of fact, for the purpose of street rod races, there is a designated 1/4 mile marker and 1 mile marker on that straight, level, good condition stretch of road. Like I said - "We Live in the Country!"

We do greatly enjoy our 50 yr. [1/2 Century] old, 4,500 lb., 1967 "Luxo-Muscle-Car" Wildcat!! Often "Sunday Drives" are taken. Although others exist... There are none others we've seen on the road since purchasing her in 1998. She's a Very recognizable "Class Act Automobile"!

Yes - I agree - I used to drag on rural streets when younger with various 70's cars like my 67 GTO. I still like a lot about those types of cars but they are woefully slow, cannot turn and have no stopping power compared to any newer cars.
When you do hit the race course with anything like those that I owned they show their limitations within 30 seconds and parts begin to fail before the 3rd run or the 3rd lap dependent upon your event. We began to build more purpose build cars some of which were homebuilt vehicles and they ran much faster but still could not compare to 'factory' sponsored vehicles. The only point I make is that even my 'fast' cars some purpose built with 700+ hp were not really competitive to folks that take racing seriously. But it was and is very fun to run at speeds much higher that most might think and have it all legal.
smitty477 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2017, 11:12 AM   #206
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,429
Speed alone isn't all that much fun to me. Every time I fly on a commercial airliner I am traveling much faster than on any car I've been in. Being a cautious soul, I start to think about all the potential pitfalls of driving very fast in a car. Hitting an alligator at speed is just one example. Mechanical failure is another. Bad things happen at high speed if something breaks.

However, I've done solo road trips where I have maintained an average of 100mph for hours at a time. Not terribly smart, but I didn't feel comfortable pushing it any further even though my car would have been perfectly happy with it.

What I found I really enjoyed was racing my car in Autocross. There you can drive the car to the absolute limit and beyond. The limit is this case is the limit of its ability to accelerate, brake, and decelerate and my ability to control it under those conditions. If I exceed that limit badly I lose control of the car and spin. Typically no damage other than cone rash. Top speeds depending on the course are typically those that you hit on the freeway, 60-80mph. It is also fun because it is competition. You are driving against others in a system which tries to minimize the differences in the cars so that you are competing based on driving skill.

Dang that is fun.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2017, 11:41 AM   #207
Guru
 
firstbase's Avatar
 
City: Jupiter, Florida
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Black Eyed Susan
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42' Classic
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,454
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigsfish View Post
You'll never get a straighter road with practically no traffic, just watch out for gators heading across the road. A friend of mine hit one in his Vett, he lived but totaled the vehicle. It was a mess.
They don't call it Alligator Alley for nothing... remember the "olden days" when it was a two lane road with shoulders that sloped immediately down into swamp. More dangerous to drive but no cops as they had nowhere to sit. Although nice and wide these days the alligators are still there.
firstbase is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2017, 01:53 PM   #208
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 10,037
Quote:
Originally Posted by firstbase View Post
They don't call it Alligator Alley for nothing... remember the "olden days" when it was a two lane road with shoulders that sloped immediately down into swamp. More dangerous to drive but no cops as they had nowhere to sit. Although nice and wide these days the alligators are still there.
Raccoon, Squirrel, Deer, Skunk, Coyote, Bobcat, Mountain Lion - Here! And, in that order of general appearance. See one Mountain Lion. Two Bobcat. A few Coyote. Many, many of the rest!

In general the time most of them will pass the road is dusk. Mid day very very seldom. Mid night not too much. Early morning seldom.
Art is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 12:54 PM   #209
Guru
 
Group9's Avatar
 
City: Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, (or where the anchor drops)
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 1973 42 Bertram MY
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigsfish View Post
Speed is relative. Relative to how much money you have. I'll go slow.
Or worse, how much you can solicit. A few years ago, I was asked to go deep sea fishing by a friend. He said we would have to chip in for fuel. I said, of course, that's utterly reasonable. We get to the boat, a sixty foot sport fish.

We then proceed to blast out of the harbor, through the inlet, swamping everything in our way like we going on a critical rescue where lives were at stake, as we charge to our first fishing spot, ten miles or so offshore. The rest of the day consists of fishing for approximately 30 minutes, then blasting full throttle to the next fishing spot, over and over again, doing at least 30 or 35 knots. One of the men has his sixteen year old son on board. He is vomiting over the gunnels pretty much non-stop the entire trip. (If he ever gets on a boat of his own volition again, I would be surprised).

We quickly catch our limit of snapper, (two apiece), at which time I figure we are in for a leisurely cruise back to the slip, sipping on beers and savoring the just completed fishing experience. I mean, that's would I would do if I were driving.

Wrong!!! We immediately go full throttle back home, again blasting through the inlet, washing smaller boats who dare to not flee, ashore until we thankfully pull up to the pier and refuel. I then discover that my portion of the fuel cost for this morning of fun is $200. I do the math, $100 per fish. Then I find it is customary on this boat to give the owner half of the catch. Okay. $200 per fish.

As I walk away, I am asked, "We will probably go out tomorrow. Would you like us to call you?"

I replied, "No thank you. I couldn't stand that much fun two days in a row."
__________________
"It's the tides. They can work for you, and they work against you. And, confidentially, I've had this problem with the tides before." Captain Ron
Group9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 01:16 PM   #210
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 20,765
Should have reported him for running an illegal charter unless he was a licensed captain and the boat met whatever charter requirements that were necessary.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 01:16 PM   #211
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 10,037
Quote:
Originally Posted by Group9 View Post
Or worse, how much you can solicit. A few years ago, I was asked to go deep sea fishing by a friend. He said we would have to chip in for fuel. I said, of course, that's utterly reasonable. We get to the boat, a sixty foot sport fish.

We then proceed to blast out of the harbor, through the inlet, swamping everything in our way like we going on a critical rescue where lives were at stake, as we charge to our first fishing spot, ten miles or so offshore. The rest of the day consists of fishing for approximately 30 minutes, then blasting full throttle to the next fishing spot, over and over again, doing at least 30 or 35 knots. One of the men has his sixteen year old son on board. He is vomiting over the gunnels pretty much non-stop the entire trip. (If he ever gets on a boat of his own volition again, I would be surprised).

We quickly catch our limit of snapper, (two apiece), at which time I figure we are in for a leisurely cruise back to the slip, sipping on beers and savoring the just completed fishing experience. I mean, that's would I would do if I were driving.

Wrong!!! We immediately go full throttle back home, again blasting through the inlet, washing smaller boats who dare to not flee, ashore until we thankfully pull up to the pier and refuel. I then discover that my portion of the fuel cost for this morning of fun is $200. I do the math, $100 per fish. Then I find it is customary on this boat to give the owner half of the catch. Okay. $200 per fish.

As I walk away, I am asked, "We will probably go out tomorrow. Would you like us to call you?"

I replied, "No thank you. I couldn't stand that much fun two days in a row."
So.... do tell... how many aboard that paid $200 each?

In other words... how much fuel did that boating buffoon use for one day.

His charging at high speed and full wake through where small boats were positioned is reprehensible in respect to basic boating ethics!

Your controlled reply to his last question is by far calmer that he deserved.
Art is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 01:27 PM   #212
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 18,247
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Should have reported him for running an illegal charter unless he was a licensed captain and the boat met whatever charter requirements that were necessary.
Absolutely. Something tells me he was using the friends pitch in for fuel routine but if they're required to or agreed to a formula or amount then it requires licensing of captain and boat meeting charter requirements.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 01:35 PM   #213
Guru
 
Jeff F's Avatar
 
City: Great Lakes
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Mazurka
Vessel Model: Mainship 34 M1
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 700
Quote:
Originally Posted by firstbase View Post

They don't call it Alligator Alley for nothing... remember the "olden days" when it was a two lane road with shoulders that sloped immediately down into swamp. More dangerous to drive but no cops as they had nowhere to sit. Although nice and wide these days the alligators are still there.
I vividly remember my first trip through there. 1983, I was 19 and living on a boat in Ft Lauderdale. Pretty wild period in South Florida. Anyway, I was hitchhiking around the state and on my way back from Sarasota. A guy in a big old muscle car picked me up. He was drunk, handed me the keys and proceeded to get drunker. Going across AA that night he insisted that I open things up, and I didn't argue. Got up to about 100 and stayed there for a while. Didn't see any gators :-)

He eventually climbed into the back seat after giving me instructions on where to leave him and his car just a few miles from my boat and went to sleep. I parked the car there and got home around dawn.
Jeff F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 01:43 PM   #214
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 10,037
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff F View Post
I vividly remember my first trip through there. 1983, I was 19 and living on a boat in Ft Lauderdale. Pretty wild period in South Florida. Anyway, I was hitchhiking around the state and on my way back from Sarasota. A guy in a big old muscle car picked me up. He was drunk, handed me the keys and proceeded to get drunker. Going across AA that night he insisted that I open things up, and I didn't argue. Got up to about 100 and stayed there for a while. Didn't see any gators :-)

He eventually climbed into the back seat after giving me instructions on where to leave him and his car just a few miles from my boat and went to sleep. I parked the car there and got home around dawn.
Ahhhh the stories of youth!! Ain't they great!

Well, most of them anyway...
Art is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 01:48 PM   #215
Guru
 
City: Melbourne, FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,480
At least you were not this guy...

stubones99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 08:26 PM   #216
Guru
 
Seevee's Avatar
 
City: st pete
Country: usa
Vessel Model: 400 Mainship
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 2,273
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Should have reported him for running an illegal charter unless he was a licensed captain and the boat met whatever charter requirements that were necessary.
Questiong: What constitutes charter vs. chipping in for expenses?

And do expenses have to be direct expenses, fuel, oil, etc?

Thx
__________________
Seevee
Seevee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 08:33 PM   #217
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 18,247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seevee View Post
Questiong: What constitutes charter vs. chipping in for expenses?

And do expenses have to be direct expenses, fuel, oil, etc?

Thx
When it's an agreed payment, then it's chartering. If you have an agreement they'll pitch in, it's a charter. Doesn't have to be direct. If you agree that in return for you taking them out, they'll pay for dinner, that's chartering. Any payment that is part of an agreement to take them out.

If you take people out and they with no advance agreement just decide out of the goodness of their heart to pay for fuel or meals or something, then that's permissible.

The better process is just to take friends out, expecting nothing in return, then perhaps totally separate they take you out another time for dinner or theater or something.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 08:45 PM   #218
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 10,037
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
When it's an agreed payment, then it's chartering. If you have an agreement they'll pitch in, it's a charter. Doesn't have to be direct. If you agree that in return for you taking them out, they'll pay for dinner, that's chartering. Any payment that is part of an agreement to take them out.

If you take people out and they with no advance agreement just decide out of the goodness of their heart to pay for fuel or meals or something, then that's permissible.

The better process is just to take friends out, expecting nothing in return, then perhaps totally separate they take you out another time for dinner or theater or something.
What if in the case mentioned... after filling the tanks with fuel...

Skipper had simply mentioned it sure would be nice if each person chipped in a couple hundred to help pay for the fuel expense the boat just incurred. And, then it was up to those aboard whether or not they chipped in that amount or less or more or nothing at all. Would that still be illegal without a license?

Additionally, for the skipper to at end of day say that everyone gives him 1/2 of their maximum legal amount of fish - I believe is - BS!!
Art is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 09:12 PM   #219
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 18,247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art View Post
What if in the case mentioned... after filling the tanks with fuel...

Skipper had simply mentioned it sure would be nice if each person chipped in a couple hundred to help pay for the fuel expense the boat just incurred. And, then it was up to those aboard whether or not they chipped in that amount or less or more or nothing at all. Would that still be illegal without a license?

Additionally, for the skipper to at end of day say that everyone gives him 1/2 of their maximum legal amount of fish - I believe is - BS!!
Boat owner mentions that asking for pay as you describe is debatable, but if they knew that was coming then I'd consider it payment and if they didn't know that was coming, a bit of a jerk to invite me on a trip and then ask me to pay. Yes, everything about that owner sounds fishy.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 09:28 PM   #220
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 12,677
I think there's some cultural differences between the cruising and fishing communities. While cruising, we'd NEVER think of mentioning fuel reimbursement and would refuse any offer of fuel repayment. If I invite someone cruising for a day, we are the hosts and you are our guest. If you really want to contribute, we'll enjoy a restaurant meal together on you. It's much appreciated, but certainly not expected.

When fishing, the unspoken standard is to split fuel, bait and launch costs evenly. It probably grew out of friends going out together in smaller boats who want to pitch in on the expenses so the boat owner doesn't absorb all the costs. I never quote a figure, but if pressed, will share the day's fuel cost. At $10 per hr, it rarely exceeds $50 total for the day. If someone brings lots of great bait, I won't take their offered fuel $$.

Do folks in other parts of the world see it the same?
__________________

__________________
My boat is my ark. It's my mobile treehouse and my floating fishing cabin. It's my retreat and my respite. Everyday I thank God I have a boat! -Al

@DeltaBridges - 25 Delta Bridges in 25 Days
FlyWright is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×