Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-02-2020, 01:49 PM   #1
Guru
 
City: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Capricorn
Vessel Model: Mariner 29 - Sedan Cruiser 1969
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,114
Stern Tie line - BC coastal & area

So I need to purchase line for stern tie ups in Desolation and other areas. For those of you cruising these waters, you know the drill. How many feet of line do I need for a stern tie. I was toying with three hundred feet, but some one suggested six hundred would be better. Being lazy, I prefer to not tie the line to shore "stuff." I'd rather double the line and tie the other end back onto the boat, again you guys know the drill.

What say you.
__________________
Advertisement

rsn48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 01:53 PM   #2
DDW
Guru
 
City: San Francisco
Country: USA
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 1,206
If you want to double back, 300 ft will sometimes be short. 400' better. But you can buy a full reel (600') for less than 400' which will usually be by the foot. It isn't so much that you end up that far from the ring or tree, but before you get pulled in and everything straightened out and tied up, you need enough line to string it while the boat drifts around and the rode is slack.
__________________

DDW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 02:14 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
w8n4sun's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Mabuhay
Vessel Model: Grand Alaskan
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 229
We have 400' and served us well in Desolation and Gulf Islands. Of course 600' would be nice just in case but you have to get used to being up close and personal with the shoreline.
w8n4sun is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 03:24 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Spinner's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Spinner
Vessel Model: 2003 Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 230
I bought a 600 foot reel of 1/2 inch polypro. I got one of these reels; it hangs just inside the cockpit transom

https://www.fisheriessupply.com/shor...pact-stern-tie
__________________
Regards

Sue
42 Nordic Tug Spinner
Spinner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 03:58 PM   #5
Guru
 
koliver's Avatar
 
City: Saltspring Island
Country: BC, canada
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,448
For years I used a couple of milk crates with 1/2" three strand nylon for my stern tie. I worked well, taking the crate of line with me, tied off at the boat, climb ashore, go around a rock or tree, and back to the boat.
Last summer I tried a spool of that yellow poly floating line (as on Spinner's post above). My spool is 600 ft long, comes on a wood spool with a 2" hole in the centre. A boathook through the hole, all tied off in a place that is out of the way, yet can feed the line across the stern of the boat. A treat compared to hauling a crate of rope with me, all I have to haul is the end of the line, around the fastening point and back to the boat. This line catches up less than 3 strand too, so easier to recover when it is time to go.
__________________
Keith
koliver is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 04:13 PM   #6
Guru
 
Ken E.'s Avatar
 
City: Bellingham WA
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Hatt Trick
Vessel Model: 45' Hatteras Convertible
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1,260
I'd recommend yellow line. Sometimes other dinks go in between your boat and the shore...saw one clothesline incident with dark line.
__________________
Ken on Hatt Trick
Ken E. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 04:29 PM   #7
Guru
 
rochepoint's Avatar
 
City: Sidney BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: RochePoint
Vessel Model: 1985 Cheer Men PT38 Sedan
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,527
We have 600' of 3/8" yellow poly braid on a garden hose reel, works great boat to shore and back. Just untie the loose end and reel it in .........
__________________
Cheers
Mike Barge
Sidney, British Columbia
Canada
rochepoint is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 04:36 PM   #8
Guru
 
syjos's Avatar


 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sandpiper
Vessel Model: Bluewater 40 Pilothouse Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,858
I carry 400' of plaited 1/2" nylon line in a 5 gallon bucket for shore tie. Plaited line lays flat and takes up less space.

I don't double the line back to the boat. It usually twists and becomes hard to pull. I prefer to dinghy ashore, retrieve the line and rinse it on the beach to keep the seaweed, mud and sand from getting all over the boat.

I prefer shore lines to sink, especially when rafted with others and multiple shore lines are set. Floating line makes using tenders difficult. With a sunk line, we can drive over it with the tender. A large float is attached to the shore line to alert others where the shore lines are located.

I don't tie to trees to avoid harm to the bark. I tie a sacrificial heavy rope around rocks and clip my shore line to that.

The shore line is also used for stern anchoring with the addition of a chain and anchor.
syjos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 06:59 PM   #9
Guru
 
firehoser75's Avatar
 
City: Nanaimo
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Pilitak
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,011
I use 600 feet of 3/8 inch polyprop (floating) line. From what I have witnessed over the years of watching others stern tie, it seems the difficult part is getting the line back to the "mothership" if you want the line to go to shore and back. To solve this, I take 2 lines ashore, the stern tie, and a much thinner "messenger line". I take both lines ashore and pass the stern tie through the ring (or rings - explain that a bit later), and tie a bowline in the end of the stern tie line. I then clip the messenger line to the bowline, and my wife on the boat reels in the messenger line bringing the stern line back to the boat quickly. On shore, I can pull slack from the mothership to ease the pulling for my "bride". We use a small electrical cord reel for storing and retrieving the messenger line. Works like a charm! Once the end reaches the boat, my wife cleats it off and pulls in what slack she can in the "bight" of the rope (first leg of the trip ashore) and cleats that off when she can't pull anymore. I then easily return to the boat and tighten up as needed.

If using a stern tie ring that is it. If going around a tree, I then use a "bridle" made out of 5/8 inch 3 strand polyprop. This bridle is about 6 feet long, with a small metal eye spliced in one end and a larger ring spliced into the other. On shore, put the bridle around the tree. Then pass the stern line through the small eye first, followed by the large eye. Attach the messenger line, and see above. The bridle eliminates any "sawing action" on the tree, protecting it.
To leave without going ashore, uncleat the free end of the stern line, and tie a knot in the end. Retrieve the line as usual. The knot will pass through the large eye, and "catch up" on the small eye, dragging the bridle back to the mothership with the stern line. I have never damaged a tree yet, and only had the system 'hang up" once necessitating going ashore to free up the snag.
While deploying (due to wind or current) we have used almost the entire 600 feet one time, so it was nice to have it.
__________________
Tom
Nanaimo, BC
firehoser75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 07:22 PM   #10
Guru
 
City: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Capricorn
Vessel Model: Mariner 29 - Sedan Cruiser 1969
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 1,114
We have 600' of 3/8" yellow poly braid on a garden hose reel, works great boat to shore and back. Just untie the loose end and reel it in

This is helpful.

I prefer shore lines to sink, especially when rafted with others and multiple shore lines are set. Floating line makes using tenders difficult. With a sunk line, we can drive over it with the tender. A large float is attached to the shore line to alert others where the shore lines are located.

Do you use a weight at the middle to help keep the line down?
rsn48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 07:28 PM   #11
Guru
 
syjos's Avatar


 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sandpiper
Vessel Model: Bluewater 40 Pilothouse Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,858
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsn48 View Post
We have 600' of 3/8" yellow poly braid on a garden hose reel, works great boat to shore and back. Just untie the loose end and reel it in

This is helpful.

I prefer shore lines to sink, especially when rafted with others and multiple shore lines are set. Floating line makes using tenders difficult. With a sunk line, we can drive over it with the tender. A large float is attached to the shore line to alert others where the shore lines are located.

Do you use a weight at the middle to help keep the line down?
The nylon line sinks to the bottom by it's own weight. When anchored in strong current, the line will sometimes rise off the bottom so I'll attach a downrigger ball.

The float marking the shore line is attached to the line with a 12' lanyard to keep the line from being lifted up by the float.
syjos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 08:34 PM   #12
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 3,492
Thank you all for remembering to not tie stern lines to trees without some sort of bridle so you don’t girdle the tree and for reminding us here.

I installed a sailboat winch on the stern rail to make pulling the stern in easier. They are frequently available at the used-boat-junk stores, usually need to be dismantled and cleaned/greased because they are the sailboater’s equivalent to Simms pumps maintenance but they are meant to last. In fact, I wish more boat stuff was as robust!

Floating line, too many oysters and rocks!
__________________
Don't believe everything that you think.
Xsbank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 08:38 PM   #13
Guru
 
rgano's Avatar
 
City: Southport, Florida
Country: USA
Vessel Name: FROLIC
Vessel Model: Mainship 30 Pilot II since 2015. GB-42 1986-2015. Former Unlimited Tonnage Master
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,653
Send a message via Skype™ to rgano
Quote:
Originally Posted by w8n4sun View Post
We have 400' and served us well in Desolation and Gulf Islands. Of course 600' would be nice just in case but you have to get used to being up close and personal with the shoreline.
If I remember correctly, Mabuhay is the first word in the Philippine national anthem?
__________________
Rich Gano
FROLIC (2005 MainShip 30 Pilot II)
Panama City area
rgano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 11:30 PM   #14
Guru
 
IRENE's Avatar
 
City: Port Angeles, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irene
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 844
Source of Supply

We went the 600’ route.

https://www.cwcglobal.com/rope-corda...opylene/yellow
__________________
Jeff
MV IRENE
IRENE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 11:49 PM   #15
Guru
 
Northern Spy's Avatar
 
City: Powell River, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Northern Spy
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 26
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 3,431
If you buy the 600' spool (like I did), you can always steal from the spool for dinghy painters and life ring lines.
Northern Spy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2020, 11:56 PM   #16
Guru
 
MurrayM's Avatar
 
City: Kitimat, North Coast BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Badger
Vessel Model: 30' Sundowner Tug
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 6,070
We have 600' and used quite a bit of it while learning. We now tuck into the corners of beaches or estuaries where the distances are shorter, setting the anchor up hill on steep sloping bottoms which gets us closer to shore.

If wind comes up on the beam, we've taken the spare anchor upwind by dinghy and tied it off to a midship cleat.
__________________
"The most interesting path between two points is not a straight line" Murray Minchin
MurrayM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2020, 12:15 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Ventana's Avatar
 
City: Sitka
Country: US
Vessel Name: Ventana
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 307
Being in BC early in the spring and again in the fall, with summers in SE, I can’t remember the last time I used a stern tie.
Our Krogen came with a 600’ spool mounted on the upper deck, which probably works fine but I’ve never taken the cover off it.
The past few months of “shelter in place” have me itching for a bit of socializing, but not enough to yearn for a Desolation Sound anchorage in early August.
Ventana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2020, 07:56 AM   #18
Guru
 
Russell Clifton's Avatar
 
City: La Conner Wa.
Country: usa
Vessel Name: Sea Fever
Vessel Model: Defever 49 RPH
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 723
Ventana:
I'm with you. We just avoid anywhere where a stern tie is necessary. There was one on the boat when we bought it but has never been used.
Russell Clifton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2020, 09:12 AM   #19
Guru
 
MurrayM's Avatar
 
City: Kitimat, North Coast BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Badger
Vessel Model: 30' Sundowner Tug
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 6,070
At the very ends of many mainland inlets, especially on BC's north coast, stern tying is the safest option because of how steep the bottom falls away from estuary drying flats.

Only under perfect conditions (light onshore breeze during the day, light offshore breeze at night) have we set the anchor hard "up hill" into the slope and spent the night...even then I set the depth alarm to let us know if a moderate offshore breeze kicked up and plucked the anchor out of the slope.

When we get a storm anchor and rode for winter cruising, it'll be at least 600' so we can anchor in deeper water where the bottom usually isn't so steep.

Smaller boats tuck into tighter spaces so our anchoring options are greater and sometimes require a bit of creativity
__________________
"The most interesting path between two points is not a straight line" Murray Minchin
MurrayM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2020, 09:43 AM   #20
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 5,690
600 ft of high visibility line on a garden hose reel.
__________________

Alaskan Sea-Duction is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×