Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-18-2022, 10:02 AM   #621
Senior Member
 
City: Woerden
Vessel Name: Moonshine
Vessel Model: Jetten 50 MPC
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 353
The things you learn, when you sail each and every day for about three weeks on your new ship! The good? Well, mainly all is good. She sails wonderfully. Stable, comfortable. Pretty decent economics too. At 7 knots she uses about 9 liters per hour. That's 2.38 gallon per hour. Anything faster and consumption goes up pretty steep. She'll do 7.5 knots at a consumption rate of 12 liters per hour and 8 knots at 17 liter per hour.

Still, the list of things that need to be added or improved upon is long. Simply because "Moonshine" was bought, by her original owner, overwhelmingly under-specced.

Here's what we'll have the shipyard do in the winter season:
1. Add a rope cutter to the prop shaft and change the shaft end bearing;
2. Add AIS and radar and autopilot;
3. Make the mast fold and drop electrically (so we can do more inland cruises);
4. Replace the old plotter with two new and bigger ones;
5. New antifauling;
6. Recalibrate electronic tank measurement systems;
7. Add a dockmaster system, so we can remotely park her (huge help in slips and locks);
8. Add airconditioning.

What we already replaced? The shore power extension cord. It was rated for 6 instead of 16 amps. New mattresses. The old ones were hard as stone.

Issues we had in the first three weeks of ownership? A scratch the previous owner hid via a boat name sticker (what a moron). And the showers not draining on (fortunately) the last day of our trips so far.

Investigation learns that the float switch was pretty dirty and therefore sticky. Also, the water pump out station (as the mechanic called it) was undersized. Using one tap and one shower at the same time would overfill the station, pushing water back up in the pipes (and later ... out via the shower drains). Everything is cleaned now, so we are good to go for another few long weekends. As long as we are wary with water drainage. A new pump out station, two sizes bigger and stronger, that should facilitate running all taps and showers simultaneously is on order.

Plans for the coming months? A few more weekends on the water in the Netherlands, while we register her as real estate (important to have all the paperwork, especially owner-oriented, in order to the max before sailing her abroad). Then we'll sail her to DMS head quarters, where she will be equipped with a MagnusMaster anti-role system. That'll be August. In September and October we'll do some more sailing. IJsselmeer, Waddenzee, if the weather permits. After that she'll go to the shipyard to have all of the things mentioned above added.

Regards, Edwin & Veronika.
Salty Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2022, 08:26 AM   #622
Senior Member
 
City: Woerden
Vessel Name: Moonshine
Vessel Model: Jetten 50 MPC
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 353
Installing MagnusMaster Stabilizers!

The boat is out of the water. The foundations for the stabilizing system (that were there from the beginning, as the MM stabs were an option on this type of boat, so it came prepared) was opened op. The "buses" (hope that is the right word) have been placed in position, through the hull, and will be welded further tomorrow.

The control box has also been installed. In the engine room, where the rotors are also situated. The control screen in the cockpit is installed. All the wires have ben put in place. Great progress in just two days!

Here are some pictures:

Regards, Edwin & Veronika.
Attached Thumbnails
85fa245e-04a6-4811-854c-1ee5e80482b1.jpg   ee226029-0d41-4cf1-8ff0-eddc23c059b3.jpg   7431bfae-301f-4420-9843-ad48012ec1c5.jpg   eb9ea68a-8447-4118-8f8f-c19182286ecb.jpg  
Salty Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2022, 07:37 AM   #623
Senior Member
 
City: Woerden
Vessel Name: Moonshine
Vessel Model: Jetten 50 MPC
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 353
Installing DMS Holland's Magnus Master Stabilizers!

All right! The work is done and - as we are told - the boat is back in the water again. Speedy job indeed! Here are some pictures of the DMS Holland Magnus Master Stabilization System. Wow, mouth full, but it works great, and that's the goal. Having sailed Salty Pelican to London and back, over the North Sea, even with 5 and 6 Bft winds, we didn't get seasick.

How it works? Well, the amount of role is measured and immediately countered by the rotors (see the pictures). Say, the ship starts to roll to starboard. The control box detects the roll that's being initiated, and "tells" the starboard rotor to start rotating backward, so that "slice" is created, lifting the starboard side of the ship upward. At the same time the rotor on the port side rotates forward to generate top-spin that pulls the port side downward. Thus, lift and negative lift are generated and used to counter the roll that would otherwise build up. How effective it is? Up to 90% of roll is countered ...

Will be taking possession of Moonshine after our vacation is finished. Probably two weeks from now. Looking forward to the test-sail!

Regards, Edwin & Veronika.
Attached Thumbnails
5e767b67-b41d-4ff9-8796-f461dee3bd24.jpg   a0800ce7-1199-46fb-9da4-ccfd856495ab.jpg   d6be6a33-03e1-4419-bf68-42d163ac0934.jpg   d036a7d1-278d-4c16-8c28-5c3fbdcc0cf7.jpg   ec0d3a04-0d60-4c11-8e0a-858aa2e14235.jpg  

Salty Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2022, 09:17 AM   #624
Guru
 
City: Newport, R.I.
Vessel Name: Hippocampus
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 2,357
Have you had enough time with it to have a sense what it requires for energy? Drag produced? Impact on range? Maintenance requirements?
Big fan of Magnus effect. Checks a lot of boxes with a mixed use vessel (coastal and blue water). But you’re still pushing a cylinder not foil shaped fin through the water. Hence my concern about drag when deployed. Your hull design suggests you’re not limited to hull speed. What’s the impact on top speed?
Hippocampus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2022, 11:04 AM   #625
Senior Member
 
City: Woerden
Vessel Name: Moonshine
Vessel Model: Jetten 50 MPC
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 353
"Moonshine" is a displacement yacht. 14m25 in the water and a top speed of 9 knots and a little bit. Rotors won't lower that. But, in use, they'll eat half a knot away, given a certain engine rpm and cruising speed.

Deployment, so when they are moved in their "sticking out"-position, takes 1500 Watt per rotor for maybe 5 to 7 seconds. That's the peak power usage: 3 kW to move 'm to the position where they work. After that about 500 Watts per rotor, so 1 kWh per hour. In more severe conditions, up to 1.5 kWh.

Since it is electric, basically no maintenance.

Regards, Edwin.
Salty Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2022, 06:40 PM   #626
Guru
 
City: Newport, R.I.
Vessel Name: Hippocampus
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 2,357
Thanks. Any impact on fuel burn when deployed and working? Not able to compute what a 1/2k loss translates to. At a fixed speed what’s the increase in burn? Realize this would vary boat to boat and at different speeds in the same boat. Just trying to get a sense of it. 5% in fin burn?greater? Less?

Would think those numbers are good. Not in a position to compare to electric fins like humphrees. Wonder if anyone else would chime in?
Hippocampus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2022, 10:50 PM   #627
Senior Member
 
City: Woerden
Vessel Name: Moonshine
Vessel Model: Jetten 50 MPC
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 353
Not sure on fuel burn. But will know once we start sailing Moonshine again in a few weeks, Hippo.

Regards, Edwin.
Salty Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2022, 12:15 AM   #628
Senior Member
 
City: Woerden
Vessel Name: Moonshine
Vessel Model: Jetten 50 MPC
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 353
Reviewing Magnus Master Rotor Stabilizer System

We sailed Moonshine home with the Magnus Master Rotor System installed. Did some measurements and came to some conclusions that might be interesting to share. Preliminary, since water levels were low in the rivers we followed. Big draught over here in Europe, so on many parts of the trip we were simply slowed down by ground effected drag. Anyhow, here we go:

1. With the stabilizers not deployed and them facing backwards, I couldn't see any difference in speed, so drag seems to be negligible when not deployed.
2. With the stabilizers fully deployed at their maximum 90 degree angle, Moonshine looses 0.8 km/h (0.45 NM) in speed, given that we sail her at a steady and similar rpm.
3. Not sure how this translates into a percentage of extra fuel consumption, as this number is pretty steady over the speed range, but fuel consumption of course rises sharply as a displacement boat nears its displacement speed. So if one were to compensate for the 0.8 km/h (0.45 Nm), well the higher the original speed, the more fuel would be needed to get back to that original speed. Hope that makes sense.
4. Stabilization works great. Our boat has a very high initial stability co-efficient. It is relatively wide and low. So in general the swings we'd experience without stabs are pretty moderate, but relatively quick (snappy). The system takes care of both the roll and of the snapiness associated with that role.
5. This two rotor system works better, with a more natural feel to it, than the one rotor system on Salty Pelican, the ship we owned before.
6. Settings allow for more or less stabilization. When one chooses less total maximum stabilization, it directly pays off in a lower drag and lower speed deficit. Allows one to tune the system to the circumstances and optimize for speed, given a certain sea state. Upping the total stabilization power takes only a few seconds.
7. The system now comes with a new screen that has better visibility and is slightly bigger and easier to work with.
8. When we upgrade to newer and bigger Raymarine screens, coming winter, we can integrate the management and control of this system to the Raymarine plotter screens.
9. Deploying the system takes a few seconds only, as the rotors swing from their 180 degrees "with the ship" passive angle towards their 90 degrees active angle. Deployment does not create any alternation in course.
10. Installation looks very professional and neat. Test and training session is done by the company with the owners present, which is trust inspiring.
11. All in all and so far we are very happy with this system. I'd recommend it for inland and coastal cruising for sure.

Regards, Edwin.
Salty Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2022, 09:56 AM   #629
Senior Member
 
City: Woerden
Vessel Name: Moonshine
Vessel Model: Jetten 50 MPC
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 353
I have a little video of how the system works, but cannot upload it here. Anyone interested in the system? Please email me your email address and I'll forward it to you ...

Regards, Edwin.
Salty Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2022, 12:33 PM   #630
Guru
 
City: Victoria B.C.
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 532
The dutch, Deep Water yachts use the Magnus system.
JWellington is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2022, 02:50 AM   #631
Senior Member
 
City: Woerden
Vessel Name: Moonshine
Vessel Model: Jetten 50 MPC
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 353
Yeah, even some semi-displacement boats have 'm. Like Deep Water Yachts and Elling. If the weather is good and they go fast, the hull shape creates stability. When they (need to) slow down to displacement speeds, they benefit from the Magnus Master stabilizers.

This system is - given its working range of up to 12 knots - primarily aimed at displacement boats. Small boats up until 20 tons (metric) can do with one system. Boats up to 40 tons (metric) use a double set-up, like we have on "Moonshine". Bigger boats can be equipped with four or six or even eight units.

I wouldn't be surprised to see some other brands switch to this type of stabilizer in the near future.

Here's the voyage of Astra. A 24 meter trawler that sails around the world. I think she's equipped with 4 Magnus Master rotors, provided by DMS Holland.

https://www.mby.com/features/around-...8owQK1mDPzfOog

Regards, Edwin.
Salty Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2022, 06:32 AM   #632
Guru
 
City: Newport, R.I.
Vessel Name: Hippocampus
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 2,357
Amazing blog. 24m and RTW. Wow!!!
Hippocampus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2022, 06:48 AM   #633
Senior Member
 
City: Woerden
Vessel Name: Moonshine
Vessel Model: Jetten 50 MPC
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 353
What's RTW?
Salty Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2022, 07:05 AM   #634
Guru
 
City: Newport, R.I.
Vessel Name: Hippocampus
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 2,357
Round the world. Common sailor short hand like BWB blue water boat. Sorry. I’m thinking your build would warrant both descriptions. Your’s could “do the clock”. (Another way to say RTW) :-)
Hippocampus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2022, 07:31 AM   #635
Senior Member
 
City: Woerden
Vessel Name: Moonshine
Vessel Model: Jetten 50 MPC
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 353
Thanks for clarifying!

English is not my native tongue.

Regards, Edwin.
Salty Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 09:47 AM   #636
Senior Member
 
City: Woerden
Vessel Name: Moonshine
Vessel Model: Jetten 50 MPC
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 353
Underwater-ship design of the LM65h

Back to the topic of us designing our own passagemaker. Here are two pictures of the underwater-ship design:

Regards, Edwin & Veronika
Attached Thumbnails
unnamed.jpg   unnamed-1.jpg  
Salty Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012