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Old 09-15-2020, 03:12 AM   #21
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That square piece of metal bolted to wood by 4 bolts and surrounding the shaft, looks like what my IG36 had around each shaft. What is it doing? One theory was a retainer preventing excess movement in the event of rudder strike. I can`t see if there is something functional relating to the shaft located underneath the metal plate, so it might be doing something.
As far as I can see the shaft passes through it with about 1cm clearance and nothing underneath.
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Old 09-15-2020, 03:15 AM   #22
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Here the bonding system is green wire, maybe down under they are black???
The best thing about standards is there are so many to choose from! As mentioned by someone the main part of the bonding system is a copper strap. Probably need something a little more flexible for this job.
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Old 09-16-2020, 09:04 PM   #23
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As far as I can see the shaft passes through it with about 1cm clearance and nothing underneath.
So it remains a puzzle. A common fitting on IGs which connects to nothing. You can`t remove it without removing the rudder, unless you cut it across and unbolt the 2 sections.
Is it adding strength to the area?
Is it intended for hydraulic steering not fitted?
Something else?
Just another sweet mystery of life?
At least my removal and continued operation of the boat pointed to no obvious negative removal consequence.
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Old 09-16-2020, 09:34 PM   #24
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That is a typical rudderstock carrier and because itís in the lazarette itís going to rust. I wouldnít worry about this as rust or scale always appears worse than it is. If you see deflection or movement then get it replaced but I doubt you will. Not knowing your vessel type I have to ask is this a balanced spade type rudder(s) or skeg base bearing supported single screw ? Itís late so Iím closing down for the night but look up rudder carrier for an explanation of what it does. Quite simple and necessary.
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Old 09-16-2020, 11:46 PM   #25
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Garbler, thanks,I searched rudder carrier. The carriers depicted seems to involve a bearing on the rudder stock whereas the IG version does not,and stands unconnected to the rudder stock it encircles. Is it somehow still providing strength or reinforcement to the rudder and if it is, how does it do that?
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Old 09-17-2020, 11:20 AM   #26
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True rudder carrier as found on commercial vessels will not be found on smaller trawler yachts. Actually the term carrier has been bastardized and used to describe a similar rudder support found in motor yachts. Itís purpose is pretty much the same which is to support the rudder assembly from falling out if no skeg and base bearing is in place and to control or stabilize the stock and tiller head against radial loads.

So I canít see much of your set up but if that rudderport has a steel plate and what looks like a shaft collar then itís a variation of a rudder carrier. Itís important on larger blade heavy stocked rudders. It helps to stabilize the upper or inboard portion of the stock against movement and to some degree vibrations that eventually take a toll on tiller head linkages, hydraulic seals and upper and lower bearings. It is also a key player in protecting rudderport fiberglass tubes which are common on Far East hulls. You donít want contact between the stock and glass tube. There should be a bearing or bushing in way of the plate and a collar to prevent dropping. Better installations have split bushings/bearings for service. Attempting repairs to rudderports and carriers afloat can be ill advised. Itís been way too many years since I was agile enough to crawl a lazerette and get intimate with this equipment so I could be a bit fuzzy on the details.
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Old 09-17-2020, 09:22 PM   #27
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...So I canít see much of your set up but if that rudderport has a steel plate and what looks like a shaft collar then itís a variation of a rudder carrier. .....
I`ve probably bothered you enough, but here`s what Simon said: "As far as I can see the shaft passes through it with about 1cm clearance and nothing underneath." If that is right (it probably is, mine was the same)ie. no shaft collar, and there is no other contact between the bracket and shaft, what is the bracket doing? I can`t see it does anything unless it`s somehow attached to or supporting the shaft. Maybe it stabilizes the area, but even that is hard to see.
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Old 09-17-2020, 10:47 PM   #28
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I am wondering if, like Lepke posited, the metal bracket is/was intended for a more robust bearing system. Interesting/odd that multiple members here have the same boat with the same, apparently unused bracket.

Is it possible the metal bracket is intended to have the shaft collar located on top of it, thereby helping spread the load onto the wood shelf? Perhaps a PO changed it for some unknown reason (I know, on multiple boats the same thing happened?)

Our boat is NOT an IG, but does have a very similar constructed boxed plate that is the mount for an upper rudder bearing. We have a shaft collar too, which is above the bearing.

In looking at some online drawings of rudder stock design, there is a piece that tends to be in that area of the rudder stock, and its called the carrier but has a bearing in it in each case.

In the OP's photo, you appear to have a shaft collar under the metal bracket, and is that a large flat washer under the shaft collar? Is there a bearing in the wood shelf?

Excuse the leaked and not cleaned up grease, but here is a photo of our rudder stock / carrier assembly for reference...

At the very top of the pic (you can only see a portion of it) is the portion of the quadrant that is mounted onto the shaft. Below that is a shaft "collar" that consists of two halves that bolt onto the shaft. There is a bearing mounted into the SS plate (you can see a couple mounting screw heads.) Finally below the plate is the packing which is mounted on a reinforced fiberglass mounting area glassed onto the hull. This is a boat with hydraulic steering, BTW.

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Old 09-18-2020, 02:31 AM   #29
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Well, I had a look at mine - sorry I didn`t get a photo. Each rudder shaft comes through the hull via the bearing and a packing gland. It then continues up about 150mm through a wooden "shelf" (12mm ply) On top of the shelf is a small plate which is bolted to the shelf. The donut, which is bolted to the shaft rotates on this small plate. Nothing else. The shaft then continues up where the steering arm is attached.

Maybe, and this is a long shot, the box section is to reinforce the plate that the donut rotates on?
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Old 09-18-2020, 08:30 AM   #30
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Bruce Iím at a loss to figure out what your metal carrier shelf is doing if it lacks the bearing and shaft collar. Back in the late 70ís early 80ís a lot of trawlers were coming in from Kaohsiung as deck cargo and for a long time their drivetrain parts including shafts, rudders, props, etc. were crated up and installed by various contractors in Long Beach and Wilmington, CA. When I had my shop in San Pedro we did some commissioning work for Hans Christian and Lord Nelson and every now and then something would be missing or wrong. It would not surprise me that those carrier parts were not in the crate or just missed by the fit out crew.
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Old 09-21-2020, 02:25 PM   #31
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A possible simple purpose.
With no skeg to support OR PROTECT the rudder
What would prevent the rudder from being pushed upward into the hull on even a light grounding? Could it simply be there to stop the donut/rudder post from being able to move upward more than an inch or so??
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