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Old 12-18-2021, 05:51 AM   #1
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Pulling up the teak

Hi all
Seriously thinking of pulling up the old, worn and heavily delignated(?) teak decking and putting diwn the product from https://www.topteak.com.au/
RMYC Broken Bay has it installed in their tenders and it looks and feels really good.
My main hesitation is I have no idea where to start removing teak decking! Would do the Pulpit first as it is a definite confined area.
Anybody removed the teak and give me some pointers?
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Old 12-18-2021, 06:41 AM   #2
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If the deck is bad enough....crowbar/prybar for breaking up the deck, vice grips for the screws with bad heads for power driver extraction, good scraper to get most of the adhesive/caulk up and a good sander for final prep.
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Old 12-18-2021, 07:07 AM   #3
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Old 12-18-2021, 08:32 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonBryan View Post
Hi all
Seriously thinking of pulling up the old, worn and heavily delignated(?) teak decking and putting diwn the product from https://www.topteak.com.au/
RMYC Broken Bay has it installed in their tenders and it looks and feels really good.
My main hesitation is I have no idea where to start removing teak decking! Would do the Pulpit first as it is a definite confined area.
Anybody removed the teak and give me some pointers?
That is my first priority next spring..LOL. As soon as the snow melts, I will be getting at it!!

It's my first priority while the boat is in the boatyard, so I need to work fast.

My wife has also researched vinyl(ish) "teak". Basically there are two types- Indoor and Outdoor. Make sure whatever you get is outdoor rated.
Everyone also says the same: "it feels good underfoot"

I will be starting at the bow and working my way to the rear. Given we have some leaking to resolve, I dont think I can get all the work done in one season.

So this year, all I plan to do is remove the teak, fix the holes (my boat has screwed-on teak! ) and then I will probably give it a coat of resin and grit and call it done for this year.
Looking at my boat, the only logical place to start (for me!), is to start at the bow and work my way to the rear.

The TopTeak or Plas-Teak or whatever its called will have to wait until the following year
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Old 12-18-2021, 08:35 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by SimonBryan View Post
Hi all

Seriously thinking of pulling up the old, worn and heavily delignated(?) teak decking and putting diwn the product from https://www.topteak.com.au/

RMYC Broken Bay has it installed in their tenders and it looks and feels really good.

My main hesitation is I have no idea where to start removing teak decking! Would do the Pulpit first as it is a definite confined area.

Anybody removed the teak and give me some pointers?
If by delignate you mean the teak is worn and cupped toward the center and the grain is raised along the lengths of the boards and the wood is filthy and gray, here is an alternative. Sand it smooth. If the deck has never been sanded, and even maybe if it has been, there should be plenty of wood left to sand it down to new wood. Doing so does require that any compromised caulking be removed and replaced (leaks). Last Spring I did just that. The deck looks almost new. Unfortunately, I do not have any before pictures but, trust me, my aft deck was UGLY. Yes, a lot of work but far less work and far less expensive than ripping out the old deck. The black caulk you see in the picture sands off easily.Click image for larger version

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Old 12-18-2021, 08:38 AM   #6
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Thanks Ted! I hope I don't have to use a planer on mine!!!
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Old 12-18-2021, 09:04 AM   #7
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Thanks Ted! I hope I don't have to use a planer on mine!!!

You may get uncountable suggestions.... it all depends on what is easiest based on how your deck was laid, with what and how deteriorated it is.


I did mine and had down 3 layers of glass cloth and epoxy (to strengthen and waterproof) in just a couple weeks using good weather as the guide.


The boat was in the water so it was less than convenient on several levels.
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Old 12-18-2021, 09:47 AM   #8
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A lot of work to remove. Has no one just applied a new top finish. I mean glass over it or put the OP product on top. Why not?
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Old 12-18-2021, 11:51 AM   #9
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Once bad enough the teak deck is not a stable enough base to really do it.


Sure. there are possibilities...but costly if they fail in the furture and probably not much less work.


The truck bed liner type paints may work (some have reported at least temporary success...but I have also seen them fail and the results are not a lot of fun to correct.
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Old 12-18-2021, 01:54 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by catalinajack View Post
If by delignate you mean the teak is worn and cupped toward the center and the grain is raised along the lengths of the boards and the wood is filthy and gray, here is an alternative. Sand it smooth. If the deck has never been sanded, and even maybe if it has been, there should be plenty of wood left to sand it down to new wood. Doing so does require that any compromised caulking be removed and replaced (leaks). Last Spring I did just that. The deck looks almost new. Unfortunately, I do not have any before pictures but, trust me, my aft deck was UGLY. Yes, a lot of work but far less work and far less expensive than ripping out the old deck. The black caulk you see in the picture sands off easily.Attachment 123939Attachment 123940
Looks nice. Did you caulk before and / or after the initial sanding?
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Old 12-18-2021, 05:23 PM   #11
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If by delignate you mean the teak is worn and cupped toward the center and the grain is raised along the lengths of the boards and the wood is filthy and gray, here is an alternative. Sand it smooth. If the deck has never been sanded, and even maybe if it has been, there should be plenty of wood left to sand it down to new wood. Doing so does require that any compromised caulking be removed and replaced (leaks). Last Spring I did just that. The deck looks almost new. Unfortunately, I do not have any before pictures but, trust me, my aft deck was UGLY. Yes, a lot of work but far less work and far less expensive than ripping out the old deck. The black caulk you see in the picture sands off easily.Attachment 123939Attachment 123940
That does look terrific, Jack! Was moisture getting through to the sub-deck before you tackled that project, or did you catch it in time? How did you deal with the teak screw-head bungs? Replace all, treat selectively, or just sand them down along with the surrounding wood?
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Old 12-18-2021, 09:42 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by SimonBryan View Post
Hi all
Seriously thinking of pulling up the old, worn and heavily delignated(?) teak decking and putting diwn the product from https://www.topteak.com.au/
My main hesitation is I have no idea where to start removing teak decking! Would do the Pulpit first as it is a definite confined area.
AndyG at RMYC did his. I did too(well, I had it done). Just replacing the teak is possible if what`s under it is sound, if water has been wicking down the myriad screws it can be degraded even to "wet weetbix" and need replacing before you get to the decorative stuff on top.. Some IGs from 1981 or thereabouts had foam sandwiched between top and bottom layers of f/g, others have teak offcuts; the former may be undamaged, the latter, well....
You may get a look at the sandwich material around the lazarette, poking it with a fine skewer even. Among my foam were 2 square teak areas fwd of the fwd steps,they were black and soft.
Other than that, the topteak sounds good.
After removing all teak, I went with 2 layers(replacing lost stiffness from the removed teak) of fibreglass painted in non skid fwd, and redid the side decks and cockpit in fresh teak, over 1 layer of f/g.
Every old screwhole into the "real deck" needs epoxying. Also the new surface needs fairing with epoxy.
Sorry for this, it can be a major job. Start with discovering what`s really under the teak. Starting at the bow section sounds a good idea.
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Old 12-19-2021, 04:33 PM   #13
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That does look terrific, Jack! Was moisture getting through to the sub-deck before you tackled that project, or did you catch it in time? How did you deal with the teak screw-head bungs? Replace all, treat selectively, or just sand them down along with the surrounding wood?
My subdeck is solid fiberglass. The caulking was gone in a few places and in other places it was just cracked and dried out. So, yes, water was likely getting underneath some but it never threatened the structure of the boat - no wood core there. The sanding did reveal some prior work on the screws. I found a few bungholes that no longer had bungs. Instead, a few screws had been replaced and sit flush with the deck. There was no need to do anything with the screwheads. They were unseen because, before I undertook the sanding, dirt had obscured all. I am very happy with the result. It was butt ugly beforehand.
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Old 12-19-2021, 10:44 PM   #14
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[QUOTE=catalinajack;1061319] Sand it smooth. If the deck has never been sanded, and even maybe if it has been, there should be plenty of wood left to sand it down to new wood.

Yeah the problem is that it is very worn down if I sande it smooth and level there would not be nearly nothing left. The good plugs over the screws are only a couple o mm thick

Part of its' problems as that as new owners 10 years ago we did not look carefuly enough into how to maintain teak decks and blasted away with a power washer and scrubbed solidly, i beleive now what I thougth was dirt coming out was in fact the timber.
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Old 12-19-2021, 10:51 PM   #15
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OK, optionj I hadn't considered going to fibreglass has some attaractions as well. As per above advice the first part of the project plan will be to clearly identify what is below the teak. So will check around the lazarette and also have a good look from below.
Thnaks All
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Old 12-19-2021, 11:10 PM   #16
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If you do remove the teak, I would absolutely go with fiberglass instead. Then paint it with nonskid. We painted the deck of our last boat with Kiwigrip and really liked it. The decks were fiberglass to begin with but the gel coat was in bad condition.
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Old 12-22-2021, 01:24 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by [B
SimonBryan;1061299]Hi all
Seriously thinking of pulling up the old, worn and heavily delignated(?) teak decking and putting diwn the product from https://www.topteak.com.au/
RMYC Broken Bay has it installed in their tenders and it looks and feels really good.
My main hesitation is I have no idea where to start removing teak decking! Would do the Pulpit first as it is a definite confined area.
Anybody removed the teak and give me some pointers?
[/B]

HI Simon,

As Bruce said we did our main decks about 10 years ago now. We had a few bouncy sections in the deck, so decided to investigate. Talk about opening a can of worms.

Removing the teak decking is relatively easy,unless a PO has decided to epoxy sections of the deck down for god knows what reason, as happened to us. We stripped the starboard the deck in about 6 hours and the port in approximately 3 weeks! Inch by inch with a hammer and chisel.Tough stuff epoxy.

Unlike Bruce's previous IG36 our boat had teak block below the fiberglass deck. They were mush. We replaced them with Klegisel foam bedded in with epoxy. Then we glassed all back down and fared the deck in preparation for the new 8mm teak. This part we left to professionals. A couple of guys came down from Queensland in their ute and cut and glued the teak down on site.

We have not done the half deck or flybridge yet, too busy fitting a new anchoring/retrival system.

We did think about synthetic teak , however I find it can get very hot in high summer, and am not convinced of its longevity, although the dockmasters at the club are very happy with it.

I think it boils down to are you a teak man, with all the potential issues that that involves or are you a low maintenance type. Personally, I feel Teak is the surest underfoot, especially when the decks are wet.

If you want to pop over for a chat Sarawana is on B4

Cheers,

Andy
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Old 12-24-2021, 02:29 PM   #18
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Retrofit Photos

Burr Yacht's website (Service>Retrofits>Nonskid Foredeck) has photos of the process they do to retrofit Flemings; https://burryachtsales.com/retrofits/non-skid-foredeck/

Lengthy process but as-new results! Photos will give you good idea of the serious work involved.

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Old 12-24-2021, 03:13 PM   #19
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You really need to know if the core is saturated and any weak spots before contemplating anything further. If the plywood or balsa core is saturated/rotting (which is the most likely scenario) then you will be removing the teak, outer FRP skin & core. Have a look at Andyís deck replacement vids on Boatworks today. To see what you are in for.
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Old 12-24-2021, 03:47 PM   #20
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removing teak decks

Simon,

You may be interested to check out this link: https://sailingmillennialfalcon.com

A young Australian couple bought a 42' sailboat in Florida with the intention to sail around the world, and they have posted 150 or so video episodes; in one of the early ones they document replacing their teak decking, and replacing it with a good-quality non-stick finish. They show a surprising amount of detail in terms of working around railings, stanchions, winches, etc. They were on the hard when they did the work, which probably made it easier, but it is quite a job! They had zero experience doing a job like this, so you get to see what NOT to do as well as the right way, which I always think is pretty useful.
Good luck, whatever you wind up deciding.
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