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Old 12-10-2020, 01:36 AM   #81
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It will probably be towed the majority of the time but while in protected waters, and docked in a marina I’ll prob have it on the davits on the stern of my boat. I’ll have it set up so It will stick out a bit on the bow end but blow boaters do it all the time so why can’t I have a longer skiff than my boat is wide at the stern lol
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Old 12-10-2020, 01:44 PM   #82
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Tow it behind your boat - you will have a great time.
I run at 20 knots. I have done a practice run and it was very unhappy over 8 knots. I think what needs to be done is the engine needs to be lowered and the helm lashed in place....then it will track straight. Just a matter if I want to tow a 1000lb boat at those speeds. I am a weekender. So maybe I should just keep it for when I slow down!
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Old 12-10-2020, 02:15 PM   #83
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I run at 20 knots. I have done a practice run and it was very unhappy over 8 knots. I think what needs to be done is the engine needs to be lowered and the helm lashed in place....then it will track straight. Just a matter if I want to tow a 1000lb boat at those speeds. I am a weekender. So maybe I should just keep it for when I slow down!
We have towed similar and larger RIBS at near those speeds for 1,000's of miles each season. If the bilge is self bailing, and you have a good bridle ,and you can get it to track well, it is a great alternative. In no case did we ever lower the engine(s) but often we did add 2 tow points to the RIBS on either side and slightly lower than the existing bow eyes.
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Old 12-10-2020, 02:50 PM   #84
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Is there any issue with towing when the weather gets fairly rough?
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Old 12-10-2020, 03:53 PM   #85
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Is there any issue with towing when the weather gets fairly rough?
Well we never knowingly cruise with really poor weather but when it has stirred up we never had a problem with waves or heavy rain for reasonable periods of time. Long swells are no problem, close waves would slow us down with the larger boat anyway so we would not be near the 16-18 knots anyway. A RIB that is self bailing and large eneough to handle the water on its own with a well setup bridle always was OK for us. We never needed to tow smaller RIBS than 15' or so ...so we would not know about those.
A couple of times in Long Island sound with short 5-6 footers and heavy rain was not a problem with a 19' RIB ...and slighlty worse conditions in Haverstraw Bay also went well.
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Old 12-10-2020, 04:13 PM   #86
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Thanks! I'm also in Long Island Sound mostly and have a small rollup inflatable but it's still a pain to haul in and deflate/inflate. I'm thinking that with the motor removed, it would skim along ok while towing. most of us don't knowingly go out in bad weather but sometimes find ourselves there, so having a dinghy that could get swamped or flipped is a concern and not something you want to deal with in rough conditions. I think I will try it next year and plan not to tow if the weather is iffy.
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Old 12-10-2020, 08:24 PM   #87
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Thanks! I'm also in Long Island Sound mostly and have a small rollup inflatable but it's still a pain to haul in and deflate/inflate. I'm thinking that with the motor removed, it would skim along ok while towing. most of us don't knowingly go out in bad weather but sometimes find ourselves there, so having a dinghy that could get swamped or flipped is a concern and not something you want to deal with in rough conditions. I think I will try it next year and plan not to tow if the weather is iffy.
"Thanks! I'm also in Long Island Sound mostly and have a small rollup inflatable but it's still a pain to haul in and deflate/inflate"
AOK - but just to be clear I have no experience nor would I recommend towing a small inflatable or RIB that was not long enough to stay stable, large enough to take the typical wave action, did not have suitable attachment point(s) , or that did not have a good self draining hull
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Old 12-10-2020, 09:40 PM   #88
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I think if planning on towing majority of the time a self bailing boat is a pretty important when you are making your list of wants and needs for a skiff. For those times when the weather does get bad not having to worry about your boat sinking after being swamped is pretty nice. So far I’ve had my little hobie power skiff out once in prob something around 13 foot waves and have felt relatively safe. Now it was super uncomfortable but I didn’t feel unsafe in the little 15 footer.
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Old 12-11-2020, 01:30 PM   #89
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We have towed similar and larger RIBS at near those speeds for 1,000's of miles each season. If the bilge is self bailing, and you have a good bridle ,and you can get it to track well, it is a great alternative. In no case did we ever lower the engine(s) but often we did add 2 tow points to the RIBS on either side and slightly lower than the existing bow eyes.
Thanks Smitty. You encourage me. Going through all of the gyrations in my head on how to solve this issue has been tiresome....not to mention very expensive. I apid a whopping $7500 for my current Caribe. I say "whopping" sarcastically because it was such an amazing deal. Every single one of my friends say "DO NOT SELL THAT DINGHY....YOU WILL REGRET IT!". They are as impressed with it as I am and I think I stole it. While a 2005, it was VERY well cared for. I bought on principle alone....IOW, I simply could NOT not buy it.

I have a bridle. BUT it only has the UNreinforced center tow eye. My thoughts were to simply reinforce that tow point and like I said, tow it with engine down. I looked into it and it won't harm the engine. Where did you add tow points? Did you add it to the fiberglass or glue on tow rings to the tubes? I think I am past the point of glue on tow rings as I am not sure they are up to the task....maybe I am wrong? Otherwise, I would have to put those new tow points into the hull and reinforce them for more of a sheer load. ANyway, just thinking out loud. It would certainly a LOT cheaper to be able to keep current dinghy....AND not only cheaper, but I really like the damn thing. But I do need a boat that can be my tender and not just a local runabout.


We have even gone so far as to trailer it 200 miles to our destination. Drive home. Drive the boat there. Drive boat home. Go back by car and trailer dinghy home. I have done that once and don't really care to do it again. Our other "normal destination" destination is Galveston and is less than 30 miles by car. Not a huge deal to do the trailer round trip twice there.....but still inconvenient.
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Old 12-11-2020, 02:52 PM   #90
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John, I bet if you can shift the CG further aft while towing combines with the low tandem tow bridle points, it just might become more stable on the fast tow.
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Old 12-11-2020, 03:17 PM   #91
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Thanks Smitty. You encourage me. Going through all of the gyrations in my head on how to solve this issue has been tiresome....not to mention very expensive. I apid a whopping $7500 for my current Caribe. I say "whopping" sarcastically because it was such an amazing deal. Every single one of my friends say "DO NOT SELL THAT DINGHY....YOU WILL REGRET IT!". They are as impressed with it as I am and I think I stole it. While a 2005, it was VERY well cared for. I bought on principle alone....IOW, I simply could NOT not buy it.

I have a bridle. BUT it only has the UNreinforced center tow eye. My thoughts were to simply reinforce that tow point and like I said, tow it with engine down. I looked into it and it won't harm the engine. Where did you add tow points? Did you add it to the fiberglass or glue on tow rings to the tubes? I think I am past the point of glue on tow rings as I am not sure they are up to the task....maybe I am wrong? Otherwise, I would have to put those new tow points into the hull and reinforce them for more of a sheer load. ANyway, just thinking out loud. It would certainly a LOT cheaper to be able to keep current dinghy....AND not only cheaper, but I really like the damn thing. But I do need a boat that can be my tender and not just a local runabout.


We have even gone so far as to trailer it 200 miles to our destination. Drive home. Drive the boat there. Drive boat home. Go back by car and trailer dinghy home. I have done that once and don't really care to do it again. Our other "normal destination" destination is Galveston and is less than 30 miles by car. Not a huge deal to do the trailer round trip twice there.....but still inconvenient.
My wife made our tow bridles and they are all similar.
- two attach points on each side
- one long main line to reach the back of the second wake wave (about 80')
- the "V" on the dinghy side and the main line are dyneema
- the "V" on the towing side is 3 strand twist
- all rub points on the tow line have chafe guard (at V attach and at hawspipes)
- the dinghy side attaches to both sides with 4" assymetric snap clips for quick attachments/detatch
- the heaviest RIB we towed was about 3,800# when loaded

The "U" bolts we used to attach dinghy
- always attached to stronger points in the RIB Hull near bow
- drilled and bolted to each dighy side lower than bow eye
- common from places like West Marine
- backed up by oversize starboard and SS plates/washers
- spread the load and divide it in two

On some long trips our daughter and a friend or two would take the RIB off the tow and go ahead of us to get there earlier and set up our slip.
I will try and post some pics of the bridle and maybe towing one of the RIBS when I get to another computer that may have the pics.
Hope this helps
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Old 12-11-2020, 03:30 PM   #92
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I had some bridle pictures handy - posting now hope this works...
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Bridle 1.jpg   bridle 2.jpg   bridle 3.jpg  
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Old 12-11-2020, 05:08 PM   #93
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Thanks Smitty. I will have to put more effort into it. I have a small dinghy, 10 foot tiller steer, that I have towed a lot. But a totally different ballgame with the big one. One driving factor is my lovely lady got thrown out of our small dinghy in relatively mild conditions. After riding in the big one, there ain’t no going back. Anyway, thanks again!!
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Old 12-12-2020, 05:01 PM   #94
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Thanks Smitty. I will have to put more effort into it. I have a small dinghy, 10 foot tiller steer, that I have towed a lot. But a totally different ballgame with the big one. One driving factor is my lovely lady got thrown out of our small dinghy in relatively mild conditions. After riding in the big one, there ainít no going back. Anyway, thanks again!!
FWIW - here is a picture of us towing a 19' RIB at about 17 knots on a 100 mile leg of a trip with that same bridle setup....
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Old 12-13-2020, 02:25 AM   #95
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FWIW - here is a picture of us towing a 19' RIB at about 17 knots on a 100 mile leg of a trip with that same bridle setup....
How many dinghies do you need??!!!!🤪🤪🤪🤪
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Old 12-13-2020, 09:40 AM   #96
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How many dinghies do you need??!!!!🤪🤪🤪🤪
Over time dinghies made all of our trips so much fun and they really did not cost us that much as they were all bought and sold used. There is no comparison between the utility of the 10-12' RIBS vs the larger ones like you have - all are fun but the larger ones can do so many more things.
The trip above was for two weeks up the Ct river and we used all 3 of the inflatables we had with us at various times.
One more picture from a longer trip to Block Island where we had about 30 boats traveling in the group - our boat is against the dock and you cannot see the 12.5 RIB which came off the boat deck but you can see the larger 24' RIB rafted up off of the other boats to the left.
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