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Old 05-25-2020, 09:53 AM   #1
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Mooring pick up with high bow

Hi Folks,


We are the new owners of a KK42 #41 which is now named Jubilee. We came over to the power side from a Camper Nicholson 39 ketch and I am wondering how folks deal with picking up the mooring over the KK42 high bow.



Do you have a ten foot high pickup buoy, do you pick up the mooring abeam and walk it forward or do you just have an enormous boat hook?



I get dizzy just looking down off the bow.


Cheers
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:07 AM   #2
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My boat has a high bow. I run a long line from the cleat through the hause pipe back to just outside my pilothouse door. Pick the mooring up there and take the line back up through the hause pipe and take the slack out. I do this solo, so getting the mooring in the right spot and completely stopping the boat is critical.

Ted
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:08 AM   #3
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We pick up from cockpit, attach a long lead and walk it forward on side decks. Many KKs have the aft enclosure that adds a gyration or two.

Many years ago I served as foredeck crew on a large ocean racer. We'd approach mooring ball under sail, helmsman would luff off and with vessel possibly stationary I'd grab it with a long boat hook. The skipper taught me some new words if I missed the grab as it was a sin to start the auxiliary and go around.
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:10 AM   #4
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We had an even higher bow than yours on our Hatteras 56MY. Depended a lot on the mooring configuration, but typically we would grab it midships. We also had an extendable boat hook available. We based ourselves one summer in Westport Harbor, MA and when we reserved the spot a month or two in advance, they were nice enough to put a long stick on a buoy Kind of like what you see on some crab/lobster pots but about 6 feet long, that we could grab when alongside.

You can see the stick poking out from the port side of the bow. I sometimes thought of getting one that we could attach to various mooring rigs if we were going to be there awhile, but never did. As a side note this is also an example of how mooring systems vary:

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Old 05-25-2020, 10:11 AM   #5
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We cleat one end of a line to the bow and walk it back outside everything to lower midship ( off the Portuguese Bridge). Sian picks up the pendant, puts the line through the eye, drops the pendant and walks the line back to the bow and cleats that.

We fall back off the ball and leave the line long until we have engines off and everything settled, then we go to the bow and snug the mooring as we wish.

It took a while for me to get comfortable doing this as I was worried about catching the mooring line on the stabilizer fin, but that really is not a worry.

Another big advantage is that I can easily see where the ball is in relation to the side of the boat - which you can't do with a high bow.

I would be cautious having your crew pick up the pendant and try walking that forward as mooring lines are pretty short as they tend to go more directly to the bottom. And with your boat falling back there will be a big strain, especially if walking higher onto the bow.
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:28 AM   #6
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I pulled up next to it on the helmsman's side and grabbed the float with a boat hook.
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:38 AM   #7
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As you'll discover, there is not one method that fits all mooring systems, which there are many variations. So take our various suggestions as a group, there is not one be-all and end-all answer. One advantage of using a managed mooring field is you can call ahead and have the harbormaster tell you what the process is; some places you can radio as you approach the harbor and they will have a launch come out and help you get secured (and maybe even sign you in). They will tell you if you need to use your own lines to make fast, which I do anyway if at all possible. Most harbormasters don't want your boat careening loose through the field any more than you do.
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:41 AM   #8
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We have been using a Hook & Moor for 5 years, and it works 100% of the time. The largest model extends to 10.4-feet. We usually pick up a dozen mooring buoys each summer and we both feel it's one of the best pieces of equipment on the boat. Totally removes the stress of picking up a mooring.

https://www.pacificnwboatertested.co...ucts/hook-moor
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:47 AM   #9
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Do you pick up from the bow using that?
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:50 AM   #10
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In a strong current past the mooring, picking it up from a high bow may not be possible. In that case, what I do is to pick it up from the lower side of the boat, or even at the swim grid and tie off. Then I arrange a bow line through the mooring eye.

If you can park with your bow on top of the mooring, then you could use a pendant that you can pick up with a boat hook, so that there is something you can reach with your boat hook and bring on deck. In my home waters, a floating pendant quickly grows weed, so is unwelcome on deck. Even carefully coiling a pendant on the top of the mooring doesn't save it from being in the water when you arrive, as animals, Otters, Cormorants, that like to claim the bouy as their own will push the pendant into the water. The shape of the bouy itself may prevent keeping the pendant out of the water

Just saw the above "hook and moor", that looks very good, but is expensive at over $300 Cdn and doesn't ship to Canada. I would be interested once shipping is overcome and the price comes down.
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:56 AM   #11
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We use our mooring bridle. Just attach it to the bow cleats normally and throw it over the mooring ball when you get close enough. The weight of the shackles and chain hook will sink the loop below the ball holding you in place as long as you want. We then use the boat hook to pull the pendant up and run our mooring line through the ring. You can then remove the bridle from the bow cleats and adjust the mooring line to the correct length.
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Old 05-25-2020, 11:16 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by menzies View Post
Do you pick up from the bow using that?
Yes, every time. Our bow is 6'6" high.
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Old 05-25-2020, 11:31 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by koliver View Post
Just saw the above "hook and moor", that looks very good, but is expensive at over $300 Cdn and doesn't ship to Canada. I would be interested once shipping is overcome and the price comes down.
We do ship them to Canada. But you're right, they are not cheap! (But well worth it, in our opinion)

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Old 05-25-2020, 12:33 PM   #14
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We’ve got a KK42 as well. You’re simply going to have trouble catching a ball from the bow! What we do is approach a ball at a crawl speed, then grab the ball at midship and walk it foreword. I don’t think that with the shape of our vessel that it would be safe to grab a ball from the swim step. Personally I don’t want any lines near that prop!
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Old 05-25-2020, 12:47 PM   #15
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Lots of good advice given. I can offer how not to do it.

Since you have a heavy boat, best not to attempt to pick up a mooring line bare-handed and try to hold it in a strong current. Mollusks just love them. Ask me how I know.
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Old 05-25-2020, 12:49 PM   #16
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Something that we’ve Found to be very handy is a”Grab-N-Go” by C. Sherman Johnson available from West Marine for about $95. This easy to use hook allows you to make an easy temporary connection to a ball while threading a more secure line Thur the eye. I leave the Grab-N-Go line connected to the ball to use as a safety line. Also makes it very safe and easy to drop the ball when you are all done!
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Old 05-25-2020, 02:05 PM   #17
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Make no assumptions. You do NOT want to secure yourself in anyway to that ball shown dangling off my bow in the picture. We had a device similar to the Hook 'n Moor on our boat, based on PNW charter experiences in the San Juans and Gulf Islands and the types of moorings we experienced up there. In our years of cruising up and down the east coast and mooring in any number of places, we never used it, for a variety of reasons, mostly due to variety of moorings.
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Old 05-25-2020, 02:05 PM   #18
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Here is another brand
EasyMoor
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Old 05-25-2020, 02:37 PM   #19
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I own the EasyMoor, the HappyHooker, and a couple of other versions. The Hook & Moor is better than all the rest, hands down. It is made better, and it works better. The mechanism is fiendishly clever.
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Old 05-25-2020, 03:18 PM   #20
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On my KK42 I pick up on starboard (starboard prop-walk) at bottom of stairs from front deck. Our bow line reaches this far. Sometimes it takes two tries but mostly not.
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