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Old 05-25-2020, 04:41 PM   #21
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We have a high bow too. So we pick up the buoy through one of the side doors, thread a rope through the loop and walk it forward. Then we can attach the buoy at bow/foredeck. We wear gloves to avoid barnacles on ropes. This became a lot easier to coordinate since we started wearing headsets for communication. Also since Iíve had less experience at this, the last time we were out, I practised it a dozen or so times and it became easier. Click image for larger version

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Old 05-25-2020, 04:45 PM   #22
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I donít know if they still are in business or not but there was a device that you mounted on the end of a boat hook called the Happy Hooker. It would thread your line thru a ring by pushing the device onto the ring and then pulling it back. It worked well but I have not seen one in years.
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Old 05-25-2020, 05:39 PM   #23
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......and when we reserved the spot a month or two in advance, they were nice enough to put a long stick on a buoy Kind of like what you see on some crab/lobster pots but about 6 feet long, that we could grab when alongside.
That's what they do at Avalon, Catalina Island. My bow is over 6' off the water and I just sneak up to the buoy & my crewman lying down on the bow reaches out and pulls it aboard. After attaching it to the bow cleat, he or she walks the line back to the stern (with gloves) and attaches it to the stern cleat. Once your bow is abeam the "stick" the whole process takes about 1 minute. It works when single handing too but it takes planning & practice.
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Old 05-25-2020, 07:01 PM   #24
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That's what they do at Avalon, Catalina Island. My bow is over 6' off the water and I just sneak up to the buoy & my crewman lying down on the bow reaches out and pulls it aboard. After attaching it to the bow cleat, he or she walks the line back to the stern (with gloves) and attaches it to the stern cleat. Once your bow is abeam the "stick" the whole process takes about 1 minute. It works when single handing too but it takes planning & practice.
Not quite sure I understand that - why is he walking the mooring back to the stern cleat?
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Old 05-25-2020, 07:29 PM   #25
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Because the Catalina moorings secure you in one direction to be bow into the inherent swell, and mitigate swinging, which maximizes boat density. One more time, moorings vary greatly in configuration and the protocol by which you secure your boat to them.

https://www.visitcatalinaisland.com/...nfo-and-rules/
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Old 05-25-2020, 07:36 PM   #26
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A word of caution to boaters in WA state re marine park and DNR bouys. When the state changed over to the newer plastic globe floats they modified the ground tackle connection. The chain runs down to a rope/chain connection and the rope then runs down to the anchoring device. At the rope-chain junction is an egg-shaped float. At zero or negative tides that float can get very close to the surface, close enough to wrap a prop if you are trying to grab the ring from a swim platform or if you somehow cross the line in gear.

This happened to us in Sucia (on a rising tide). The diver had cut loose another boat at Sucia just 3 weeks prior and yet another boat at another park a week before that. In the first instance the captain waited almost too long to call for assistance - the water was just a couple inches from breaching the transom door when the diver made the cut. She said it sounded like an explosion and the stern seemed like it cleared the water. (It didn’t of course.)

So a word of warning to WA state captains who have switched to using the swim platform for picking up the mooring and walking it forward, or are thinking about it.
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Old 05-25-2020, 07:40 PM   #27
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Because the Catalina moorings secure you in one direction to be bow into the inherent swell, and mitigate swinging, which maximizes boat density. One more time, moorings vary greatly in configuration and the protocol by which you secure your boat to them.

https://www.visitcatalinaisland.com/...nfo-and-rules/
Didn't answer my question, but the graphic in your link did.

It is a bow and stern tie.
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Old 05-25-2020, 08:06 PM   #28
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We have been using a Hook & Moor for 5 years, and it works 100% of the time. The largest model extends to 10.4-feet. We usually pick up a dozen mooring buoys each summer and we both feel it's one of the best pieces of equipment on the boat. Totally removes the stress of picking up a mooring.

https://www.pacificnwboatertested.co...ucts/hook-moor
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Old 05-25-2020, 08:27 PM   #29
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I echo that regionally or even locally you will run across different types of moorings. Those of us posting RE the Pacific Northwest are typically dealing with park mooring buoys, that typically have a chain topped with a large ring passing through them. It is possible for a strong crewmember (in no wind/current with a well piloted boat) to hook the chain loop with a conventional boat hook, pull up the loop, and pass a line through. In practice this can be scary, you have a large boat drifting off station, with the master unable to see the buoy, and the crewmember unable to physically signal because both hands are full trying to hold on to the hook...

We carry the Grab n Go, hook n moor, and conventional boat hooks. None always seem to work 100%, but we always get onto the aforementioned moorings with one of them, depending on the exact style/conditions. Our hook n moor is relatively new to us, and has only been used 5-6 times so far.

But the OP asked about dealing with the high bow. NWD's bow is approximately 7 ft off the water at the bow. Amidships it is closer to 3.5 or 4 ft. (I'll have to go measure, now!)

All of our hooks are long enough to deploy from the high bow, but it tends to be a little more fiddly depending on conditions. I think people overthink picking up the mooring at the tip of the bow - yes, that's where it rides after you're done, but put the mooring where it is best for the master and crew to pick up.

Single handing the past two weekends picking up moorings (ie the buoys noted above) I primarily tried getting the mooring alongside just forward of amidships, and had my hook of choice rigged and ready to go. That allowed me to have a bow line ready that I could get onto the mooring, then tie off to one of my bow cleats.

Making sure to have the mooring (buoy) alongside instead of at the tip of the bow allows you to be down closer to it, and make it less likely for the boat to drift off to the other side of the mooring. You can move fore and aft easily to capture a mooring, but if it goes off to the other side, now your line and the pulpit/anchor are all fouled. Depending on visibility from the helm/flybridge, keeping the buoy off to the side past the bow also gives the master a chance to observe the mooring directly, and better position/maneuver the boat to keep it in position.

At the same time, I have a line rigged and ready at the stern. If I can't get it with the bow, and drift past it, I have a second line rigged to get myself secured. Once secure and on the mooring, you can usually get another line through the mooring and carefully migrate to the bow. I did that last weekend. This weekend my hook and moor worked perfectly. It didn't last weekend, but that was because I'm not usually using it and was not proficient enough to get it on the first try in current and wind. But my backup stern line and old school boat hook got me secured, and then I was able to get a bow line through the eye, and walk it forward.

Like others have posted, some always pick up the mooring well aft, and walk it forward. This weekend I watched a 32 Bayliner (hardly a super high bow, but with a very close to the water cockpit) in completely calm conditions secure to the mooring at the stern first, then walk it forward. It occurred to me that is their default way of doing it.

My point of reference is tying to single point (buoy) moorings here in the PNW. The bow/stern mooring fields found in SoCAL (Catalina for example) may or may not be handled in the same way - the videos I've watched (Winty on Youtube) indicate the mooring has a long whip you pick up that has line you then tie to your fore and aft cleats. I'm totally unfamiliar with what the east coast has available for moorings, so none of this may apply!

Please follow up with your experience, it enlightens all of us to see different ways others come up with or settle on for dealing with this mundane little tasks!
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Old 05-25-2020, 08:46 PM   #30
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I'm totally unfamiliar with what the east coast has available for moorings, so none of this may apply!
The east coast is pretty broad, with huge differences in mooring buoy set ups between south and north (e.g. Yorktown Riverwalk Marina mooring field that looks like a couple of dozen WWII floating mines!) but I will describe what I have seen in the SE and the Bahamas, while discussing the design of well maintained moorings.

The moorings around here have a big white ball with a smaller ball or "crab float" on a short line. Off that smaller ball is a pendant with an thimble eye. You can either grab the line between the mooring ball and the "crab ball" and then get the pendant/thimble or the line after the "crab ball," though you need to make sure you get the pendant thimble.

One you have either you can pass a line through the eye and bring it back to the boat. I have seen boats that actually bring the thimble on board and put it over a cleat, not my choice as they are often very tight plus pretty dirty!
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:04 PM   #31
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I do like most have said, take the ball alongside just outside the PH door, snag it with a hook, with line in hand. Eye thru the loop and walk it forward. One more thing about our state park buoys. Get enough current running and the ball will sometimes completely submerge and can get your line all wrapped up in the chain, underneath the ball.
Had this happen at Clark Is last summer, took me about 10 minutes to get my line untangled from the stupid buoy. Not too big a deal if you can roll the buoy over, but tough to do when the current is strong enough to roll it over.
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:34 PM   #32
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On my KK42 I pick up on starboard (starboard prop-walk) at bottom of stairs from front deck. Our bow line reaches this far. Sometimes it takes two tries but mostly not.

Exactly! Thatís what we do. We pick up the loop with a pike pole and then pass a line through. For the most part we get it done in one go. Then we walk the line to the pulpit and each through the two hawse holes.
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:45 PM   #33
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My boat has a high bow. I run a long line from the cleat through the hause pipe back to just outside my pilothouse door. Pick the mooring up there and take the line back up through the hause pipe and take the slack out. I do this solo, so getting the mooring in the right spot and completely stopping the boat is critical.

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Are you saying you actually run the buoy line thru the anchor "hawse" pipe? That seems a little counterintuitive.
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Old 05-26-2020, 12:20 AM   #34
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Just saw the above "hook and moor", that looks very good, but is expensive at over $300 Cdn and doesn't ship to Canada. I would be interested once shipping is overcome and the price comes down.
Ship to Canada? I bought one at Harbour Chandlers in Nanaimo.

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Old 05-26-2020, 03:26 AM   #35
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I always pick up from the cockpit. The bow is pretty high and I am single handing. I have a side-opening door in the cockpit that puts me almost a water level for that purpose. I wouldnít pick up from the swim step even if it werenít mostly covered by the tender - too easy to go in the drink if current or wind are moving the boat. I have a hook n moor, but generally donít use it. However, a friend showed me a really good technique for that just this weekend (at Sucia), and I think I will give it a try. I will post pictures if I am successful :-)
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Old 05-26-2020, 06:52 AM   #36
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Are you saying you actually run the buoy line thru the anchor "hawse" pipe? That seems a little counterintuitive.
He didn't say anchor hawse pipe.
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Old 05-26-2020, 07:38 AM   #37
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Unless it's a mooring with a particularly tall pick up stick, we typically pick it up from the aft deck (or the swim platform if necessary) and then pivot the boat and walk the line forward. Although if wave action isn't a concern, we'll sometimes just take a mooring off the stern depending on wind direction and what that gives us for shade / sun. The boat sits a lot more calmly in the wind off the stern.
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Old 06-01-2020, 12:43 PM   #38
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We use a grappling hook

Our Whaleback has no side walk around so picking up on the side is impossible. We use a light grapple hook attached to a polypropylene light line. Come up to the ball and drop the grapple beyond the pendant. Pull up yo retrieve the light pendant then the heavier mooring line itself. Second person sometimes needed for heavy lines. Have a short snubber to loop through mooring eye.

It works 90% of the time. On the east coast we use it 20 or more times a season. It does not work when the pendant does not have a float to hold the pickup line. This does not work if only a ring at top of buoy.

We tried the grab and go type hook but found it too heavy to maneuver at full extension.

Grapple available at Hamiltonís our other fishing supply place for cheap

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Old 06-01-2020, 01:46 PM   #39
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Ah, these small boats are so easy! Every time I was aboard a destroyer (usually conning or on the bridge in direct support) into Hong Kong, we had to perform the agonizingly complex standard Navy mooring to the man-of-war buoy dance. Entering harbor, prep an anchor chain by detaching it from the anchor and horsing it up to the bullnose. 500 yards or so from man-of-war buoy; launch the whaleboat with standard 3-man crew and two buoy jumpers with appropriate tools. Head the ship into the current and stop with the bullnose a close to the buoy as possible, and pass a mooring line messenger to the whaleboat which then transfers the buoy jumpers and the line to the buoy while remaining carefully clear of the area between ship and buoy. The messenger is rove through the buoy shackle, and the end returned to the ship where a lot of manpower is available to help pull the 6-inch mooring line down to the buoy crew who hopefully very quickly shackle it to the buoy. And we are moored, right? Wrong. Next the ship is winched up tight to the buoy (jumpers having retreated to the whaleboat) and the anchor chain is lowered to the buoy. Then the whaleboat returns the buoy jumpers to the buoy where they shackle the chain to the buoy shackle. Now we are moored. There are any number of ways this evolution can go very wrong very fast, and until that mooring line is first made fast to the buoy, the conning has to be of a high degree of precision. Unmooring is the reverse. The last time I was there in command of a towing and salvage ship, we were invited because of our size toe moor alongside HMS Tamar, the Royal Navy base. What a pleasure to not have to wait forever at either end for the water taxi!
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Old 06-01-2020, 02:07 PM   #40
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We have a high bow too. So we pick up the buoy through one of the side doors, thread a rope through the loop and walk it forward. Then we can attach the buoy at bow/foredeck. We wear gloves to avoid barnacles on ropes. This became a lot easier to coordinate since we started wearing headsets for communication.
That's a very good point (headsets) when hooking up to a mooring ball. They sure take the stress out of communicating with the catcher. We've used them for about 2 years without a shouting contest.
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