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Old 09-17-2023, 09:47 PM   #61
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Are we talking about the same Manatee? There are many positive attributes to a Manatee. Seaworthy and easy line handling do not immediately jump out. How do you lead a bow line aft so someone on dock can belay the bow? God forbid if you're single handing.

Did I miss something? I like the Manatee, but let's be honest. There are some serious issues to overcome.

Peter
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Old 09-18-2023, 07:52 AM   #62
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Iím not sure I understand your question. With my bow line attached at the bow, I just walk it back to the aft and hand it to the dock hand. Not sure Iíve ever wanted to do that. There are cleats everywhere I need them and I have lines everywhere I need them.

People concerned about line handling on a Manatee have never actually line handled on a Manatee.
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Old 09-18-2023, 08:04 AM   #63
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I'm not saying there are not ways to adapt. Some boats require more creativity and adaptation than others. Many of the newer style Motoryachts have similarly voluminous interiors that come at the expense of deck level access.

I personally like the Manatee because it's quite brazen in the compromise between deck space and living quarters. It's a great livesboard. But if I were cruising and docking in different locations frequently, or spending time in open water with even moderate swells and wind waves, it would not be high on my list. Having written that, I'm sure there are Manatee owners who have made trips and dealt with exactly those conditions. They adapted. I'm just saying the boat requires more adaptation than others. Not a knock, just an observation which I think is fair.

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Old 09-18-2023, 08:48 AM   #64
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The real trick in docking is good line handling. Many boats are seen to have docking issues and many boaters I know are poor line handlers. The two could be a bad combo.

If a Manatee is desired, learning better line handling is in order....well maybe auto positioning electronically could substitute.

If all conspires to not allow better line handling, I can see one not feeling a Manatee as a good choice.

I solved many a boater's docking problems by just loaning them a longer boathook..... yep.... many boaters just never get enough experience to be really good at most boating skills. There's 2 ways to get them.... use a boat a lot and challenge oneself or get a job as a pro mariner.
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Old 09-18-2023, 09:11 AM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
The real trick in docking is good line handling. Many boats are seen to have docking issues and many boaters I know are poor line handlers. The two could be a bad combo.

If a Manatee is desired, learning better line handling is in order....well maybe auto positioning electronically could substitute.

If all conspires to not allow better line handling, I can see one not feeling a Manatee as a good choice.

I solved many a boater's docking problems by just loaning them a longer boathook..... yep.... many boaters just never get enough experience to be really good at most boating skills. There's 2 ways to get them.... use a boat a lot and challenge oneself or get a job as a pro mariner.
....or get bow and stern thrusters.

I definitely agree with your overall sentiment - I called it adaptation.

I scrolled through pictures of about a dozen Manatees. Only two had midships cleats at the caprail level (vs upper deck level). Having a midships cleat allows a breast line (short line between the boats cleat directly to a dock cleat - normally only used temporarily while boat is tied-up). Midship breast line would more or less keep either end of the boat from drifting too far. For this boat, a common option would be to lay the stern line first and come forward on it.....assuming you can get the stern to the dock.

I think location matters in this discussion. The West Coast is exclusively floating docks. East Coast, where most of the Manatees reside, are primarily pilings except for fuel and guest docks. With exception of normal challenge of backing a single screw boat, Manatee would be okay for pilings.

Don't get me wrong, having more living space is great. If I were to buy a new boat in the 40-ish foot class, would have full width saloon such as a Nordic Tug. Doesn't bother me a bit to go through the saloon to dock.

Having owned and occasionally lived aboard a relatively small 36-footer, I covet the space on a Manatee. I would not be averse to owning one. But the interior space comes at a price. That's all I'm saying.

Peter.
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Old 09-18-2023, 09:34 AM   #66
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I never had midship cleats for over 5 years.... never got around to replacing them after redoing my decks.

Adaptation....but that requires the understanding you don't really need them and not listen to the cacophony of boaters saying the breast line is the "best" first line for tying up. There are many ways to dock and ty up.

Bull rails are a challenge for any single handler without really good skills or good tools to help.

I did also write "If a Manatee is desired, learning better line handling is in order....well maybe auto positioning electronically could substitute." That would probably include thrusters or directional controllable thrust on outboards, pods or some sort of non traditional shaft drives.....

The old adage of "if it were easy, everyone would do it" comes to mind...well many aspects of boating are not all that easy but yet it seems everyone is doing it.
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