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Old 06-24-2022, 01:22 AM   #21
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Here is a link to that article by Charles Culotta.

https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/...1&postcount=27

He was. I think, the first guy in N America to try pickup bedliner on his teak decks to stop leaks. We tried this last year on our decks, as a stopgap measure to buy some time before taking more permanent measures. I chatted with Charles several times. He said his boat was still leak free after 10 years, at which time he sold it. He paid a lot of attention to the surface prep. The Durabak polyurethane bedliner he used is available now in a transparent version, which is what we used. and can be rolled and painted on. I hope our beat up an-teak deck lasts half as well as his. So far so good, and it looks nice, in its beat up way. I regard it as a sort of emergency temporary fix at best.

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Old 06-25-2022, 03:58 PM   #22
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My teak decks were left on because they were structural, but the entire thing was coated with elastomeric. Then painted with sand mixed in. It was perfect!
My aft deck is all teak and last year I re-caulked and sanded down to new wood. It came out very nice. I do not think the teak had ever been sanded but here is another option if your decks are leaking. Mine were not but the caulk clearly needed to be renewed. If they were leaking I would seriously consider the product I am about to describe.

It is a liquid sealer made by Semco, not the Semco stuff that is like varnish but another product by a company named Semco (semcoworks.com). Semco call its a liquid membrane and represents that it can be used on concrete basement floors, concrete swimming pools, tile, and wood. I just sealed the basement floor in our newly-built home. This stuff is amazing. It is water based so easy cleanup. Roll or brush it on. It cures quickly to a rock hard surface and seals completely. Requires two coats. Use on a leaking teak deck and leaks be gone. I would have thought the surface would be slippery but it is not. A sand mix can be added for more traction. It is very easy to apply as opposed to kiwigrip.

Guys, take a look. I think this product will pique the interest of a few of you. There is no doubt that this is the product I would use to rehab a leaking deck absent a tear-out. One gallon costs about $110 and covers 200-250 square feet, two coats.
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Old 06-25-2022, 09:48 PM   #23
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I think Kiwigrip is very easy to apply, but I would not put it over teak decks. Wrong product for that application. Kiwigrip is great on fiberglass decks.
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Old 06-25-2022, 10:44 PM   #24
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I am tied up between two boats that have great teak. One, a CL 37, has the most perfect varnish of any in our club. The owner does it. His brightwork is so perfect that I told him he can't tie near me. He took it well.
The other has a Sonship 58 with minimal teak. His cockpit rails are done by the other guy, so are perfect. In return, he does his own and the other guy's teak decks, with Semco "natural". I discovered this when I was standing, barefoot, on his deck and asked what it was, thinking it was one of the synthetic teak products, but when I stood on the synthetic teak deck on a different 58 Sonship, it was unbearably hot. His weren't. He explained what he had and what he used on it.
I will be trying that product. It works!
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Old 06-26-2022, 09:13 AM   #25
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Thanks for the Semco link cj. This is definitely worth considering. There are a few end edges that need to be refastened. Once that is accomplished I could clean and use the Semco elastomeric sealer. That could buy me some time before the inevitable. Plus have some funds for electronics updates.
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Old 06-27-2022, 02:13 PM   #26
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Removed mine. 44' Marine Trader Tri-Cabin

My teak was bedded in a rubber compound and screwed down. The screws mostly had to be turned out with vice grips after prying off the teak with hammer and those 2 inch wide flat pry bars, sometimes resorting to hammer and chisel, when unable to catch an edge of the teak otherwise. Cleaning off the rubber bedding was mostly angle grinder with the metal sanding flap discs.

Removal is best done from scaffolding of some sort so standing leaning in, but also on deck with a stool and padding to lean your chest on so to work with both hands.

Crunch time is a careful survey of the deck when clean to fiberglass with a tapping hammer. A steel hammer is not tuned for the job. With a little practice you can map soft core, sketching it out with marker as you go.

Cut out sections of skin where needed leaving an inch or inch and a half intact next to the walls that will have to be dug out from the side, painful, but that lip is needed for strength in the rebuild. Don't bother with long lifts of skin, keep them to 18 inches or so with cross members left joining side to side and being 2 inches wide, and relatively easy to clean under and wet out when you get to it. Clean up the removed skins of all adhesives and sand them to make ready of top and bottom fiber glassing. I prepped my skins with holes to allow air to escape when put back in place. I.e. resin will ooze up from the holes if all is well.

I used balsa core and glass layers/resin above and below to fill the void, leaving room for one final glass layer/resin to accept the skin. The balsa sheets have the advantage of being really easy to size to the void using only a blade. And, they wet out thoroughly so are not going to rot in any relevant lifetime. Anyway, the water is not going to get to the core with a sealed top. I find the result strong and firm so options that might theoretically be better engineering solutions may be overkill, outside the side decks that might be a real consideration.

Did I mention all the sanding this all entails.

I am finishing with a layer of heavy fiberglass over the whole deck before moving on to the coatings for finish and non-slip.
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Old 06-27-2022, 05:10 PM   #27
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My 37 sundeck boat had fiberglass deck soft spots. The solution would have been to remove the top fiberglass layer, dig out the rotted balsa, replace the core and re-glue the carefully cut out fiberglass onto the new core. I note this because cored fiberglass decks also have issues.


Cosmetically, the re-glued fiberglass wouldn't have been pretty. A cosmetic solution could have been a new wood topping over the repaired fiberglass sandwich: i.e. add wood rather than remove it.



We sold the boat before I got to any of this.



If there is a way to salvage and seal that teak deck, I'd be looking at it, since cored fiberglass also has issues.


There's a stain I've been using on my wood docks and pontoon boat deck made by a company called Boodge. I have to reapply it every couple of years, but there's virtually no prep required and the reapplication takes less than an hour. If I had a teak boat deck, I'd consider this stain.
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Old 06-28-2022, 08:39 AM   #28
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Has anyone removed them? According to the web...... GB did not start gluing them til early '90s. '81 going to survey and I would take them off (as they are passed due) and apply nonskid.
I am removing mine from a GB36 1973 model. There is what looks like polysulphide (black) beneath, also with (believe it or not) duct tape. I really don't know what the duct tape is all about. I tried a few different methods and settled on a hammer a 3' ply bar. Just ripping them up and rip the screws out. I am in an unusual circumstance ( I was in the industrial coatings business and we sand blasted and coated steel & concrete structures) so I am going to try sand blasting the glass afterwards to see if that is easier/better than grinding. I will post something when that happens. Good luck, it just comes down to a lot of crappy work no matter how you approach it.
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Old 06-28-2022, 09:17 AM   #29
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BDalt, Iím exhausted and sweating and my arms ache, just reading your post of the work to be done!
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Old 06-28-2022, 10:30 AM   #30
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Quote:
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My teak was bedded in a rubber compound and screwed down. The screws mostly had to be turned out with vice grips after prying off the teak with hammer and those 2 inch wide flat pry bars, sometimes resorting to hammer and chisel, when unable to catch an edge of the teak otherwise. Cleaning off the rubber bedding was mostly angle grinder with the metal sanding flap discs.

Removal is best done from scaffolding of some sort so standing leaning in, but also on deck with a stool and padding to lean your chest on so to work with both hands.

Crunch time is a careful survey of the deck when clean to fiberglass with a tapping hammer. A steel hammer is not tuned for the job. With a little practice you can map soft core, sketching it out with marker as you go.

Cut out sections of skin where needed leaving an inch or inch and a half intact next to the walls that will have to be dug out from the side, painful, but that lip is needed for strength in the rebuild. Don't bother with long lifts of skin, keep them to 18 inches or so with cross members left joining side to side and being 2 inches wide, and relatively easy to clean under and wet out when you get to it. Clean up the removed skins of all adhesives and sand them to make ready of top and bottom fiber glassing. I prepped my skins with holes to allow air to escape when put back in place. I.e. resin will ooze up from the holes if all is well.

I used balsa core and glass layers/resin above and below to fill the void, leaving room for one final glass layer/resin to accept the skin. The balsa sheets have the advantage of being really easy to size to the void using only a blade. And, they wet out thoroughly so are not going to rot in any relevant lifetime. Anyway, the water is not going to get to the core with a sealed top. I find the result strong and firm so options that might theoretically be better engineering solutions may be overkill, outside the side decks that might be a real consideration.

Did I mention all the sanding this all entails.

I am finishing with a layer of heavy fiberglass over the whole deck before moving on to the coatings for finish and non-slip.

In reference to cleaning out underneath the 2" sections left near the wall and bulwarks, I used a 4" chainsaw type disk on a grinder. I bought the disks and chains on Amazon. They work great for getting under that lip and removing material. CAUTION: these things will tear you up BADLY if you are not very careful. It is after all a chain saw blade. Be sure and use the handle that I have seen so many guys remove (and have done myself). Go slow, think about what you are GOING to do and what you ARE doing. Don't take ANY risks and they work great. Here's a link. https://www.amazon.com/Carving-Grind...s%2C137&sr=8-4
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Old 07-18-2022, 03:48 PM   #31
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Well, no need to worry about teak decks or fuel tanks. That boat did not survey well and was rejected. Blisters.
So found one down in Marathon. A '79 36' that has new fuel tanks, no teak on main deck, and no blisters or moisture on the bottom. Haulout scheduled to replace 4 plastic drains with bronze at water line.
Look to replace the main and gen intakes as well. Any suggestions on replacements?

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Old 08-17-2022, 08:58 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catalinajack View Post
My aft deck is all teak and last year I re-caulked and sanded down to new wood. It came out very nice. I do not think the teak had ever been sanded but here is another option if your decks are leaking. Mine were not but the caulk clearly needed to be renewed. If they were leaking I would seriously consider the product I am about to describe.

It is a liquid sealer made by Semco, not the Semco stuff that is like varnish but another product by a company named Semco (semcoworks.com). Semco call its a liquid membrane and represents that it can be used on concrete basement floors, concrete swimming pools, tile, and wood. I just sealed the basement floor in our newly-built home. This stuff is amazing. It is water based so easy cleanup. Roll or brush it on. It cures quickly to a rock hard surface and seals completely. Requires two coats. Use on a leaking teak deck and leaks be gone. I would have thought the surface would be slippery but it is not. A sand mix can be added for more traction. It is very easy to apply as opposed to kiwigrip.

Guys, take a look. I think this product will pique the interest of a few of you. There is no doubt that this is the product I would use to rehab a leaking deck absent a tear-out. One gallon costs about $110 and covers 200-250 square feet, two coats.
Has anyone used this on their teak decks? Would like to see a picture or hear the results.
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Old 12-20-2022, 09:01 AM   #33
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GB 32 Decks?

Looking at a 78 with weathered decks. How to fix? Bungs are falling out not enough wood left to restore the teak.
Iím thinking sand smooth fill voids with epoxy fairing putty. Re-sand then
Do a few layers of epoxy glass. No apparent leaking at this time. Then paint with two part epoxy primer. Finish up with than imitation vinyl?
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Old 12-20-2022, 10:43 AM   #34
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It is not very hard, just hard on your back. They can be painted but the results will depend on literally hundreds of factors, most related to prep.

I covered mine with vinyl (pontoon deck covering) So far I like the look and result.

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Old 12-20-2022, 10:44 AM   #35
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If the teak is that worn then it will have water leaking into the core. Just glassing over it is like building a house on a shaky foundation. I would strip the teak off and then check the core for leakage and soft core. Then fix the soft core and lay some glass over the whole deck. Paint the deck with Kiwigrip and you donít have to finish the glas quite as smooth. The Kiwigrip will cover minot imperfections.
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Old 12-20-2022, 12:23 PM   #36
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So try to remove all bungs then the screws. Next set circular saw to 1/2” and rip across every foot or so. Then use an air chisel to pry up the teak?
Work from the stern forwards. Fill screw holes as you go.
How do you check for weakness in the sun decking?
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Old 12-20-2022, 12:47 PM   #37
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How do you check for weakness in the sun decking?
Jump
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Old 12-20-2022, 01:01 PM   #38
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I use a phoenolic hammer to check by tapping. You should get a sharp tone not a dull thud. It is pretty easy to figure out what is good or not. It may not be as accurate as a moisture meter but if you buy a moisture meter and donít have experience with it you will not get good results. I use the hammer in the photo below. You want a hard plastic surface on the hammer. I carry it when I am looking at a boat just as a quick test of the decks.
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Old 12-20-2022, 02:50 PM   #39
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I first drilled the bungs with a hole cutter in a cordless drill, then mechanically removed the screws, then pried the boards up. Later I just hammered a large pry bar ($10 at Harbor Freight) under the boards and ripped them up. I used the slotted end of the pry bar and yanked the screws out. This was much faster (albeit crude) and I could do a lot of it standing up.
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Old 01-15-2023, 02:26 PM   #40
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Teak Deck Replacement

Hey Old Sea Dog!
Take a look at "Teak Deck Replacement on GB32" my posting from last spring. It will give you a good idea of what you are in for. Good luck!
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