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Old 04-17-2021, 07:46 AM   #21
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The rear windows on my 1992 46' are sloped.
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Old 04-19-2021, 08:51 AM   #22
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Which Batyline product?

Can you provide specifics on which Batyline product is used in your application?

It looks like it might be the Solits product. Do you know what % open mesh?


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Hi Steve

Thank you. Yes indeed I leave the batyline see-through covers all the year long except when cruising long distance at night from the inside helm for better visibility.

These batyline "dim" the light just perfect, well let see through from inside and mask the inside of the boat from outside. Also they perfectly prevent mosquitoes and bugs to come in when windows are open.

They cover and protect as well the external frames of the windows.

Indeed I cover with sunbrella to protect from the weather when not in use or sometimes as well at the anchor when too much sunshine.
White sunbrella for the saloon windows to let the daylight in, marine blue to obscur the 14 windows of the 3 cabins for long sleepers
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Old 04-19-2021, 01:14 PM   #23
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Can you provide specifics on which Batyline product is used in your application?

It looks like it might be the Solits product. Do you know what % open mesh?

Hi Contingensea,

"Batyline Soltis" has different % open mesh but it's not what I have.

Mine is "Screen Boat Batyline Iso" Reference 7407

Sable color ("sand" in English) Refence 5029
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Old 04-19-2021, 04:22 PM   #24
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To illustrate the great sketch from Ray.

Enlarge the pic where a green arrow is pointing. Itís the same "system" on the top track.

Monitoring for earth-quacks???
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Old 04-19-2021, 04:38 PM   #25
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Monitoring for earth-quacks???
Itís a marine barograph, a recording aneroid barometer where the changes in atmospheric pressure are recorded on a paper chart.
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Old 04-19-2021, 06:13 PM   #26
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Itís a marine barograph, a recording aneroid barometer where the changes in atmospheric pressure are recorded on a paper chart.

Interesting "little" device your don't often find on a boat! How old and what brand is it if your don't me asking?
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Old 04-19-2021, 07:48 PM   #27
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Interesting "little" device your don't often find on a boat! How old and what brand is it if your don't me asking?

I don't mind at all

This barograph was made in France by MAXANT, a company specialized in developing and manufacturing technical and scientific instruments.

The aneroid barometer was invented by French watchmaker Antoine Redier (1817-1882), it was patented in 1844. At that time Antoine Redier manufactured thermometer, hygrometer, timer, chronometer (stopwatch), pressure controller, in a little factory located in Paris.

Later, the factory was bought by Lťon Maxant (1856-1936) who manufactured precision instrumentation and controls including barometer and barograph. Then Lťon's sons took over in second generation and developped the company, then followed by Lťon's grand-son until 1999 when the campany Maxant was sold to Jules Richard to form the JRI Maxant company.

Now JRI Maxant company is manufacturing thermal appliances and temperature indicators and recorders in the field of ultra high precision for the pharmaceutical sector, hospital, research laboratory, health care, health and safety's logistic. They have developed innovative technological solutions in monitoring on site and remotely the appropriate storage conditions of Covid vaccines.

From the 19th century until 1990, Maxant was a French Navy approved supplier.

In late 1978, my future husband, who was 22 years old at that time, won a very unusual contest, organised by a Grand Banks dealer. He was awarded with this barograph.
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Old 04-20-2021, 06:49 AM   #28
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Interesting "little" device your don't often find on a boat! How old and what brand is it if your don't me asking?

Before digital barometers, the state of the art was the aneroid barographs. The most important element for predicting weather is looking at trends, not absolute numbers. Frequent readings are necessary to understand what the barometer is telling us.

The solution to the need for noting trends is to have a recording barometer (barograph), a device that makes a record of pressure readings over time. Then if you donít pay attention until weather deteriorates, you still have a record. Pen and paper barographs use aneroid barometers to measure air pressure and record it on paper attached to a drum. The drum turns slowly, usually powered by clock movement, as the pressure changes and the arm moves, it makes a mark on the paper. The drum takes a week to make one revolution, after which the paper must be replaced.

The old-fashioned recording barographs with pen and paper drums are expensive and vulnerable in their glass cases, and generally only true devotees carry them on cruising boats, like myself. They are still so precise that many of them still operate in perfect working order.

New barographs are almost exclusively digital, which allows to digitize, amalgamate and quickly compare stored charts. Also most everyone carries a smartphone these days, and since itís collecting data from the phoneís own sensor, the app doesnít require Wi-Fi or cellular service to work.
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Old 04-20-2021, 05:14 PM   #29
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Before digital barometers, the state of the art was the aneroid barographs.

I think you meant "Android", correct? And, what is this "paper and pencil" instrument you are referring to? I'm not sure I'm familiar with this....

By the way, you might want to upgrade the electronics on that yacht of yours! You can get live satellite images downloaded right to your multifunction display, phone or tabloid! Garmin recently did away with paper. It might give you a bit more detail about the weather! I'm kidding of course.


Great info, thanks! I worked for a German balance and scale instrument company (Sartorius) for ~25 years. There old 1800's and early 1900's units looked very similar, also in a glass wooden cases. Now they are mostly Biotech company.
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Old 04-20-2021, 06:15 PM   #30
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You are welcome.

"The aneroid barometer was invented by French watchmaker Antoine Redier (1817-1882)". I meant "aneroid", not "android" .

An aneroid barometer is a nonliquid barometer. It contains a flexible-walled evacuated capsule, the wall of which deflects with changes in atmospheric pressure. This deflection is coupled mechanically to an indicating needle, or to a pen on a barograph.

I like your humour . Yes I have as well a computer and some electronic devices on board , but we like this barograph that in late 1978 my future husband was awarded with when he won the first prize of the contest of the youngest world-wide Grand Banks's owner. Indeed he took delivery of his new Grand Banks 42' Classic on the day of his 23 birthday. We got married 6 months later and spent our honeymoon aboard, cruising the Western Med. Just saying that for the small history of the barograph we have aboard, not at all "to show off". 2 months ago I had a good laught when one member of the forum asked me on a sarcastic tone if "I had ever put my foot on a boat ?" while I have been boating for more than 40 years on our several Grand Banks .

Thanks for the pic of the lab scale instrument. You worked for Sartorius ? Great! Sartorius (indeed now "Sartorius Stedim Biotech") is now a key partner company in the global biopharmaceutical industry, biotech industry, and the research sector, especially in bioprocess development and instrument services among many others applications and services. Sartorius is so-called "the Rolls-Royce of health".
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Old 04-20-2021, 09:39 PM   #31
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Thanks to all the replies. Steve your attachment will not open . That's what I am looking for a picture of how they are attached. I did look on Sailrite and their eye with hook is not for a pleat as far as I can tell. We had mini blinds on our last boat and I was not a fan, besides I want the "Grand Banks look". The sketch Ray sent was VERY helpful but I have never seen that kind of "mushroom" attachment for curtains. I am wondering if I could just stitch the eyes that are made to slide in the track to the curtain pleat.
Another question is are your curtains made of a lightweight material and lined ?
Thanks so much for all the input it is much appreciated.
Jann
Ray's sketch is very accurate. I will try to get you a picture so you can see them. What is really nice about these pleated curtains is that they seem to be pleated linen, with all the "dubs" and inconsistencies that give them texture in interest. I started to have all mine dry-cleaned, and had a couple of them done, in spite of worried disclaimers from the cleaners that they might disintegrate. They're a little yellowed, and the first two I sent in had blackened due to what I think was maybe some hair grease where the former owner may have put their head back and stained them. Nonetheless, they came out just fine, intact and pretty. That means about 12 more trips to the cleaners if I take them in pairs, which seems to me like the best approach because I don't know if each are a little different shaped, or are standard shapes. I totally agree, those pleated linen curtains are a classic look that I'd hate to lose.

I guess the u-shaped aluminum track extrusions and plastic buttons are proprietary, but I don't know where they're from because I haven't looked for them or needed to replace them. The curtains hung from the buttons are a bit fussy to get out of the tracks behind the valences, but I did do it with the one pair I started with.

It'll take me a day or two to send you a picture, but it will help me finish with the project of cleaning them all. Please remind me if I haven't got back to you. Best
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Old 04-20-2021, 09:44 PM   #32
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Oh, also mine are not lined, just hemmed as appropriate.
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Old 04-21-2021, 12:28 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilou View Post
Thanks for the pic of the lab scale instrument. You worked for Sartorius ? Great! Sartorius (indeed now "Sartorius Stedim Biotech") is now a key partner company in the global biopharmaceutical industry, biotech industry, and the research sector, especially in bioprocess development and instrument services among many others applications and services. Sartorius is so-called "the Rolls-Royce of health".
Yes, I was involved with the Stedim purchase and spent a bunch of time in Marseille France as the Stedim HQ is in the town of Aubagne next door. Without Sartorius, we most likely would not have the c19 vaccine right now. Itís there bio-reactors, equipment and filters that are making it possible. But I know nothing about all that, I ran the IT dept here in NA.

FYI, I was just joking with the Android reference.
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Old 04-21-2021, 01:17 PM   #34
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Yes, I was involved with the Stedim purchase and spent a bunch of time in Marseille France as the Stedim HQ is in the town of Aubagne next door. Without Sartorius, we most likely would not have the c19 vaccine right now. It’s there bio-reactors, equipment and filters that are making it possible. But I know nothing about all that, I ran the IT dept here in NA.

FYI, I was just joking with the Android reference.
I work in Marseille, I know where is the Sartorius Stedim Biotech plant in Aubagne managed by Olivier Guitard where they work on different systems around a bioreactor process to mix different components and raw vaccines.
Also Sartorius has a partnership with Minebea Intec, Hamburg, Germany on bioreactor process.

I agree with you, no Covid-19 vaccines in 2021 without Sartorius, I told you that at my work we call it the Rolls Royce of Health.

Thanks for very interesting chat, my apologies to the OP !
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Old 04-21-2021, 05:41 PM   #35
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Check out R.I.F in La Ciotat, love that restaurant.
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Old 04-24-2021, 10:14 PM   #36
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I have a 2000 GB 42C. She has pleated curtains. There's a pretty good group on Facebook called Grand Banks Owners. Look it up (you may have to join the group, but it's worth it). One owner recently redid their pleated curtains and uploaded a file on exactly how they did it. It will be a big help for you. Lots more GB info on there as well. Another good place to ask GB specific questions.
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Old 05-06-2021, 10:39 AM   #37
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Thanks for the Facebook information. I guess Iíll have to join now! I have been making trial curtains out of old sheets and may have finally made an inroad. I really appreciate all the advice. As always the forum is a treasure trove of shared information!
Jann
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Old 05-12-2021, 07:51 AM   #38
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Hello there! Just a quick question to the OP... I just bought a 49 Classic and I am looking to redo the Headliner. You mentioned that you are too in that process, Have you source the fabric for it? Do you know where to get or are you going with the Slat look?
Thank you Sir!
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Old 05-12-2021, 08:18 AM   #39
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Hi, we did a ship lap headliner. Pre primed white pine boards that we primed again with oil base marine primer then finished with semigloss marine interior paint. We have teak battens to finish it but havenít gotten to those yet. It was a lot of work but isnít that the definition of boat? We are happy with the way itís turning out.
Jann
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Old 05-12-2021, 09:29 AM   #40
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FANTASTIC!! Great work there.. Looks like the boards are jointed like tongue and groove?
Looking forward to see the finish work.. I want to do the same work on mine!!
Are you around Ft Myers/Punta Gorda area?
Also would you mind if I message you with a couple of questions?
Thank you!!
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