Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-24-2020, 02:00 PM   #41
Senior Member
 
City: San Diego
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 263
Re: winterized boat and proving you're a serious buyer. It seems to me that a serious seller would have everything running. The burden is on the seller to have the boat ready to go. Unless it's being offered for a crazy low price.
__________________
Advertisement

Swfla is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2020, 02:09 PM   #42
Senior Member
 
stroutmail's Avatar
 
City: Port Deposit, MD
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Grand Day Out
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36 Classic
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEXTrawler View Post
I looked into this boat a few months ago. Based on the engine serial numbers they are 375 hp versions not 435s. My main concern was the decks...in several places the teak has become delaminated and the sikaflex is completely loose or missing. I'd estimate there is water intrusion in a some portion of the deck coring. I didn't want to mess with that issue so I waived off.
Biggest risks with old boats with teak decks is probably the engines and the decking. As mentioned, teak decks with loose or missing caulking are sure signs of water intrusion. The hull is solid fiberglass--the decks below the teak are fiberglass with a core--usually plywood or foam. If the core gets wet and deteriorates, the only fix is to cut it out---can be a very messy and big deal.

While the surveyor may not be uber experienced with teak, he should be able to give you an idea of the condition of the underlying deck. In any case, the broker is aware that teak deck and core repairs are expensive---again, if you like the boat, simply factor an estimate for cost of repairs into your offer. (Some people have removed the teak deck from a Grand Banks and refinished the deck as a fiberglass non-skid one. It is still a very big job.)

https://www.cruisingworld.com/replac...onumental-job/
__________________

stroutmail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2020, 02:15 PM   #43
Senior Member
 
City: Prescott, Arizona, USA
Country: USA
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 115
I am a big fan of GB's and routinely charter one up in BC to cruise the Broughton's. I concur with the other remarks that Cat 3208's seem to be a bit of overkill for a GB 42 but it is what it is. We know about the brightwork and GB's have a fair amount. We talked about window leaks. Check the drain holes in the track to be sure they are open. The windows can be resealed but it's pricey and best left to professionals. The decks can be refastened where necessary and re caulked. Check out the TDS website for more information. Key unknown is the condition of the black iron fuel tanks, they can leak and it is prohibitively pricey to remove and replace - especially with behemoth 3208's in the way. An earlier comment remarked on access to the outboard side of the engines - be sure you can get in there and work comfortably. Of course get a survey. Good luck, I love GB's but unless they are kept up they can be a money pit to get right.
Exctyengr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2020, 02:16 PM   #44
Senior Member
 
stroutmail's Avatar
 
City: Port Deposit, MD
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Grand Day Out
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36 Classic
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swfla View Post
Re: winterized boat and proving you're a serious buyer. It seems to me that a serious seller would have everything running. The burden is on the seller to have the boat ready to go. Unless it's being offered for a crazy low price.
I sure agree on that, but I bought my boat from a serious seller with the boat at a very large and reputable broker and it was not ready to run when I viewed it--even though I made an appointment well in advance and drove more than 200 miles to see it. In my case, the problem related to COVID 19 and a shortage of boatyard workers.

Hard to know the whole story here but it appears the seller and broker may be afraid that the boat will still be sitting around this winter or they don't have people to do the work.
stroutmail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2020, 02:19 PM   #45
Senior Member
 
City: San Diego
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 263
This one, being under cover may have minimal water damage but ripe for it once out in the elements. Either case calls for repairs from someone versed in deck replacement. If there is the possibility of keeping the boat in it's current location, It'd be worth negotiating a year for repairs. We're all making experienced guesses. It does sound like the buyer is checking himself before hiring a surveyor. I think that's something we would all do. Keep up the good work!
Swfla is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2020, 02:32 PM   #46
Senior Member
 
Flatswing's Avatar
 
City: Windmill Harbour, Hilton Head Island, SC
Country: United States
Vessel Name: River Girl
Vessel Model: 2004 DeFever 49 RPH
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 181
Welcome! Those Cats are due for turbo service. Plan on $2500 per side minimum even if the motors run fine. Much more if the turbos and/or exhaust elbows are toast as I suspect they are. Pay careful attention to the top (External) of the fuel tanks. GB of this vintage with teak decks are notorious for leaking around the deck fills, rotting the deck core and then rusting out the tanks, repair/replacement will be more than the cost of this boat.
Check windows carefully for signs of leaks/rot -another common problem in this vintage. As others have mentioned, the time or cost of keeping up the exterior teak brightwork is not for the uninitiated. Most who say they will do it themselves, never finish stripping and applying the required 8-10 coats the first time unless they are fully retired like me. It truly is a labor of love - not for those who actually work for a living. Understand that this boat has a reputable pedigree and the hull is almost certainly solid. BUT - itís an as is where is sale, which tells you the owner either couldnít or didnít keep up the myriad of upkeep needed to maintain the GB pedigree. Unless you are familiar with trawler upkeep and maintenance, guaranteed you will underestimate the time & dollars required to make it the way you perhaps envision by a factor of 2, probably 5. If u are serious about purchase, donít be afraid to invest $1-2k in a good survey from someone who is familiar with GB. If u have to walk away As a result, it will be the best $2k u ever spent.
How do you expect to run the boat? On LOTO, surely most boats are weekenders? The GB is a coastal cruiser -burning 4-5 gph at 8 knots. It will plane And cruise at 16 knots but your fuel burn will curl your hair. This is not a lightweight boat. Great boat to use as a weekend cottage in a covered slip, quick cruise to another cove or for lunch and backwith friends with planing weekenders - not so much. As we used to say with our GB ďothers get up have breakfast and go to xyz, we get up, head out & have breakfast en routeĒ, Ďcause 50-70 NM is a full day.
That said if the engines run fine, the tanks are in good shape and you have some mechanical skills and donít intend to bring it back to Bristol condition, itís a lot of boat for the money. Your significant other (If present) has to really love it too,
__________________
Jeremy
Flatswing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2020, 03:00 PM   #47
Senior Member
 
Bryant's Avatar
 
City: Fleming Island, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sakura Perdido
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 316
1983 gb 42

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael S View Post
Hi, im new to the forum and I am considering buying a GB 42 classic, 1983. I have a Lakehouse at Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. Not the normal place youíd expect to find a Grand Banks, but there is one here for sale. Itís a one owner bone that spent a number years in Florida before being transported to this landlocked lake. It No longer has a mast or boom which is probably not a problem for this lake but makes it less desirable on the coast. It appears to have been well cared for throughout its life But bas been sitting without use for a couple of years. Wondering if anyone can offer advice on what the key things are to evaluate with this boat as Iím deciding whether or not to make the investment. The boat has been winterized and so I have not seen it running. The broker says that the generator does not work and that he thinks itís caused by a fuel issue.
Hereís the listing- many thanks in advance for taking a look and offering your thoughts.
https://www.boattrader.com/boat/1983...assic-7099409/
My GB 36 is an 84. First thing you need to do is check to see that you can insure an 83 and what it will cost. Older boats are getting harder to insure and it's getting more expensive. If you are financing the boat, your financial institution will require a survey as will your insurance company. They will then require all major issues to be repaired. Could be costly. The engine hours are good. Does this boat have the original fuel tanks? If so, they will probably need to be replaced. Costly and difficult. How many AC units does it have? How old are they? I just replaced my main 16,000 BTU unit in the saloon and it ran $2,500 installed. I see it still has teak decks. You may have a moisture issue in the deck. A survey will tell you that. And that's a lot of work to maintain. A new generator is costly and if you are going to anchor out at all, you need a generator. If you are ever considering having a dinghy and storing it on top of the boat you will need a mast and a boom, or a small boom and winch. The blister situation will need to be looked at and addressed. The price is reasonable, depending on what your survey says. The best money you will ever spend on that boat is the best survey you can get. You may find out it's a bargain or you may find out there is more work to be done than the boat is worth. I love my GB but trust me, whatever the survey says, an older GB is going to require some TLC and some investment. I've put a little over $30k into mine since purchase and I'm not finished yet. Good luck!
Bryant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2020, 04:20 PM   #48
Guru
 
rgano's Avatar
 
City: Southport, Florida
Country: USA
Vessel Name: FROLIC
Vessel Model: Mainship 30 Pilot II since 2015. GB-42 1986-2015. Former Unlimited Tonnage Master
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,877
Send a message via Skype™ to rgano
I sold a 1972 wooden hulled Grand Banks 42 (twin Lehman 120s - THE perfect engines for this boat) in 2015 for $61K and considered the new owner got a good deal - he still talks to me without calling me names. A 1983 GB42 in fiberglass in the same condition as mine should go for 2-3, even four times as much. This boat is priced for SALE. The level of neglect this poor boat has suffered is evident when you compare the photos of it and what I consider a reasonably well maintained GB42, which also lived undercover for many years. If I were crazy enough to get back into a GB42 again, and I bought this boat for the asking price and no sea trial, I would expect to put at least the full sales price back into it to get it anywhere near condition to re-sell down the line. The electronics look ancient. Do not be so naive as the believe the broker's comment about "fuel issue" as the reason that old clunky Onan generator isn't running. Decks! Are you a gluten for punishment or do you have a good friend knowledgeable and willing to help in what sounds like a massive job? Lastly, if you just want something to soak up money and dock time with probably little cruising enjoyment for about the first five years, buy it.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Awlgrip-roll-no-tip.jpg
Views:	16
Size:	88.3 KB
ID:	105429   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC00124.jpg
Views:	17
Size:	137.1 KB
ID:	105431   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC00054.jpg
Views:	17
Size:	124.5 KB
ID:	105432  
__________________
Rich Gano
FROLIC (2005 MainShip 30 Pilot II)
Panama City area
rgano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2020, 05:00 PM   #49
Senior Member
 
Bryant's Avatar
 
City: Fleming Island, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sakura Perdido
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 316
83 gb 42

Quote:
Originally Posted by rgano View Post
I sold a 1972 wooden hulled Grand Banks 42 (twin Lehman 120s - THE perfect engines for this boat) in 2015 for $61K and considered the new owner got a good deal - he still talks to me without calling me names. A 1983 GB42 in fiberglass in the same condition as mine should go for 2-3, even four times as much. This boat is priced for SALE. The level of neglect this poor boat has suffered is evident when you compare the photos of it and what I consider a reasonably well maintained GB42, which also lived undercover for many years. If I were crazy enough to get back into a GB42 again, and I bought this boat for the asking price and no sea trial, I would expect to put at least the full sales price back into it to get it anywhere near condition to re-sell down the line. The electronics look ancient. Do not be so naive as the believe the broker's comment about "fuel issue" as the reason that old clunky Onan generator isn't running. Decks! Are you a gluten for punishment or do you have a good friend knowledgeable and willing to help in what sounds like a massive job? Lastly, if you just want something to soak up money and dock time with probably little cruising enjoyment for about the first five years, buy it.
Brutal, but Brutally honest and some good insight and advice. Honestly, if you are going to use this boat as nothing but a "Dock Condo" on the lake and have no intention of actually using it on the water, offer $40k and see what they come back with. Either way, it would be a pretty cheap "lake cabin". Then be prepared to sell it for a song when you are done with it. If you intend to actually use it on the water, you are probably looking at a significant post purchase investment to bring it up to speed. Survey will tell.
Bryant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2020, 06:27 PM   #50
Guru
 
City: Boston
Country: US
Vessel Name: Adelante
Vessel Model: IG 30
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 884
The fuel tank might leak, the core may rot, blisters may form, a meteor may hit you tomorrow. The fuel tank might not leak, the core may be fine, and blisters never sank a boat. Lighten up people.

Yes, use a borescope to check top of tank. Also around the backside if you get access. Iron tanks have a finite life if they have been allowed to rust. Yes, there might be some wet core. So What. If your foot goes through the deck then it's a problem. If the deck sags when you walk on it, then it's a problem. Otherwise, the boat won't sink.

I think OP would appreciate shared wisdom on potential issues. Projecting your fears and predicting doom if he proceeds isn't helpful. It's a 40 year old boat at a bargain price.
SoWhat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2020, 06:47 PM   #51
Senior Member
 
City: San Diego
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 263
Quote:
Originally Posted by stroutmail View Post
I sure agree on that, but I bought my boat from a serious seller with the boat at a very large and reputable broker and it was not ready to run when I viewed it--even though I made an appointment well in advance and drove more than 200 miles to see it. In my case, the problem related to COVID 19 and a shortage of boatyard workers.

Hard to know the whole story here but it appears the seller and broker may be afraid that the boat will still be sitting around this winter or they don't have people to do the work.
Glad you were able to move forward with your purchase despite COVID related lack of prep. But I do think that in general it's reasonable to expect things to be running and unwinterized. If, in reality it's not, proceed with caution and tight purse strings.
Swfla is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-24-2020, 07:13 PM   #52
Senior Member
 
Bryant's Avatar
 
City: Fleming Island, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sakura Perdido
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 36 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 316
1983 gb 42

Quote:
Originally Posted by SoWhat View Post
The fuel tank might leak, the core may rot, blisters may form, a meteor may hit you tomorrow. The fuel tank might not leak, the core may be fine, and blisters never sank a boat. Lighten up people.

Yes, use a borescope to check top of tank. Also around the backside if you get access. Iron tanks have a finite life if they have been allowed to rust. Yes, there might be some wet core. So What. If your foot goes through the deck then it's a problem. If the deck sags when you walk on it, then it's a problem. Otherwise, the boat won't sink.

I think OP would appreciate shared wisdom on potential issues. Projecting your fears and predicting doom if he proceeds isn't helpful. It's a 40 year old boat at a bargain price.
As the owner of a 36 year old GB, sharing wisdom of potential issues that are particular to these boats is exactly what Iíve done. Not projecting my fears. I gave him an honest opinion based on experience, which is what a forum is all about.

The deck doesnít have to sag when you walk on it in order to have serious water intrusion issues. And typically, older GBs with teak decks have these issues. If the survey says there are issues beyond a certain point, you canít get insurance without fixing that and itís costly and involved.

As the owner of an older GB, I know what the hidden demons can be in these boats, what the cost and effort to fix them are, and Iíve tried to point those out so that the OP goes into this with eyes wide open. The poster that said he would probably have to invest as much as the original cost in order to deal with these potential issues was exactly right. Again, a competent survey will answer these questions.
Bryant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2020, 11:15 AM   #53
Senior Member
 
City: San Diego
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 263
Hi Michael S. I don't think you said if the engines had been properly "winterized" a few years ago when the owner realized he no longer wanted to "engage" with the boat. If it was winterized, that gives a MUCH better chance of the engines being easily brought to running usable condition. It sounds like you're slowly moving forward, we all understand that job and family comes first. I would think that by now, the owner/broker would be making maintenance records and logs available to you. How far away are you from the boat location? As always, wishing you clear vision as you learn more about a potential deal. David.
Swfla is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2020, 10:15 PM   #54
Veteran Member
 
City: St. Clair Shores, MI
Country: U.S.
Vessel Name: Solvogn
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 32
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 51
Huge engines in that old boat?

Something is wrong. That boat has no need for those engines. I would not touch it unless I heard them running. It looks like a money pit -- POs who did not have their heads screwed on straight.
grandbanksbayfield is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2020, 11:26 PM   #55
Guru
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Country: US
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 8,516
We are going to look at an older Hatteras Tuesday. I called Boat/US to see if they would insure a boat of that vintage. No problem and surprisingly the quote was only about 300 more for a stated value 3 times greater. So insurance can be had on older boats (1977).
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you arenít one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2020, 11:39 PM   #56
Guru
 
hollywood8118's Avatar
 
City: Port Townsend Washington
Country: USA
Vessel Name: " OTTER "
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander Europa 40
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,952
As an alumni of the grand banks owners I dont think that the boat shows too bad. If it has been under cover most of its life the decks may be just fine, the tanks may be fine too. Not that the pics are great but the interior looks decent and unmolested and I dont see any telltale signs of veneer discoloration or window leaks. I agree the motors are too big for a 42 but it isn't the end of the world, they probably were used lightly in that boat and could run for years. In the end someone will buy it and could get great boat. Yes it could also be a money pit, but a low dollar one.
HOLLYWOOD
hollywood8118 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2020, 08:37 PM   #57
Member
 
City: Kansas City
Country: USA
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 5
Thanks again for all of the constructive thoughts. I appreciate both the brutally honest concerns about potential problems, and the encouraging comments about the value of this boat. I live about three hours away from the lake and hope to get back there next weekend. More investigation to come!
Michael S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2020, 06:42 AM   #58
Guru
 
wkearney99's Avatar
 
City: Bethesda, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Solstice
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 47 Eastbay FB
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,317
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swfla View Post
It does sound like the buyer is checking himself before hiring a surveyor. I think that's something we would all do.
We've done this. I've taken the guy that handles coordinating all my boat work with me. Crawled all over the boat looking for "the usual suspects", identifying anything obvious. Satisfied that what we saw wasn't overly problematic, we hired a boat surveyor AND and engine surveyor. Both inspected at the same time, to avoid trips in/out of the water (winter in the northeast). We did a sea trial that same day, with both surveyors on board. Best money spent. Got us a laundry list of 'things to do' and leverage to haggle on the final price. Definitely something worth doing.
__________________
-- Bill Kearney
2005 Eastbay 47 FB - Solstice
wkearney99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2020, 09:00 AM   #59
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,917
Quote:
Originally Posted by grandbanksbayfield View Post
Something is wrong. That boat has no need for those engines. I would not touch it unless I heard them running. It looks like a money pit -- POs who did not have their heads screwed on straight.
I said as much on post # 18.
The OP needs to look at other boats.
Lots of other boats out there.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2020, 09:32 PM   #60
Senior Member
 
Capn Craig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 487
Overcoming the 'land locked' lake might not be too expensive. A sixty to sixty five mile haul from Lake of the Ozarks to Jefferson City on the Missouri River would put the boat in navigable water to anywhere in the midwest, Gulf Coast, or East Coast.
__________________

Capn Craig is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
grand banks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×