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Old 06-24-2014, 05:05 AM   #41
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Old 06-24-2014, 06:25 AM   #42
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Hi
I'm curious. Are 36 owners happy with their size of boat or do you wished you had bought a 42? Still trying to figure out what would work best for us.
thanks
We love our Clipper 34, but would have loved a 36'. Amazing what that extra gives. But I've looked at 42's, and for a couple, they seem larger than we would want to look after, moor and service. 'Course if I could have afforded a 40', that's a whole other matter...
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Old 03-13-2022, 11:00 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by bcarli View Post
Hi
I'm curious. Are 36 owners happy with their size of boat or do you wished you had bought a 42? Still trying to figure out what would work best for us.
thanks
We have had a GB 36 for 12 years and love her. Single screw, which I wanted and love. Wouldn't want twin screw. I think of her as a cozy mountain cabin.
I have heard there are single GB 42's, mostly in the NW, and would fly to see one. I think GB was brilliant in this design as everything is the same except just that much larger, which I might really like. But it still has to be a single screw which I haven't found. I wish they made any of them with paravanes, and we'd love a center island berth. There's no room for any sort of real stabilization in a 36 with out making the ER a nightmare.

If anyone has a single screw GB 42, please contact me. I'd be motivated.
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Old 03-13-2022, 11:18 PM   #44
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One thing to keep in mind is that maintenance costs escalate rapidly with length. The rule of thumb I was given was costs double for every five feet. While one could debate that figure one thing is very clear is that moorage is by the foot and I've seen many marinas where the per foot charge increases over 40'. So if a 36 meets your needs you'll save money over the long run vs a 42. But make sure you're comfortable with a 36 otherwise you'll be wishing for a 42 every time you see one.
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Old 03-14-2022, 02:42 PM   #45
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The living space will increase dramatically, but so will the fuel costs. If fuel costs are not a consideration, then go for the 42. That's the upside.
The downside is that depending on age of you and your crew, docking will be a little more strenuous, probably, a lot more. The other downside is that when you get over around 40', available dock space decreases. Depending on your local area and places you intend to travel to, this may or may not be an issue.
Just something to think about.
We didnt have a Grand Banks, we had a 36 Mainship Aft Cabin model. The 2 of us were quite comfortable with it. Every ones comfort level varies.
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Old 03-14-2022, 03:54 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bcarli View Post
Hi
I'm curious. Are 36 owners happy with their size of boat or do you wished you had bought a 42? Still trying to figure out what would work best for us.
thanks
So, seeing as it's been almost eight years since the question was asked, which way did you go?
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Old 03-19-2022, 11:54 PM   #47
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So, seeing as it's been almost eight years since the question was asked, which way did you go?
They are now selling a 32 Bayliner
https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/...ml#post1086046

Since I posted in an 8 yr old thread, may as well answer the OP.
We like our 36GB and considered the 42. There is a 6 foot difference. If it was all in the saloon/salon it would have won us over. As it is, I do not see much more than 2 foot extra. Sure, a little here, a little there gives more elbow room, but I do not need more room in the sleeping areas.
In a few years I may regret not getting a Europa 36, so there is that.
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Old 03-20-2022, 06:30 AM   #48
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Willard made the Willard 36 from 1961 thru 1970. Somewhere around 1972, they launched the W40. We've owned our W35 for 25 years and have ocassionally considered upgrading to a W40, mostly for the second stateroom. The W40 also has an exceptional engine room for its class (still a crouch affair though). If we were to start from scratch, we'd go with the W40. But benefits are not so grand that it offsets the expense and difficulty in swapping boats. Plus after 25-years, there's sort of a bond with the boat.

I have spent some time on GB36s. Personally, I consider it the absolute gold standard in trawlers for entry level people (even though GB calls them "cruisers" vs trawlers). They handle exceptionally well, are well suited to a single engine, and there's plenty of space for the average family with some friends. Plus they are large enough to cover some ground and cruise if so desired. Despite the legions of similar designs such as the Monk 36, the GB36 stands out with a certain fineness of design. I suspect that had I fallen in love with a GB36, I'd be equally hesitant to upgrade to a GB42 as I am with my Willard. Maybe even more hesitant since I really like single engines and so few GB42s were delivered with a single.

Good luck

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Old 03-20-2022, 07:09 AM   #49
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Not stressed is what size and displacement means beyond issues of second stateroom.
Increased lwl means higher hull speed.
Increased displacement means softer ride.
Increased size means greater payload.
Two heads means two holding tanks or even with one a much larger one.
Increased size usually means increased range.

On a day to day this commonly means (there’s exceptions) there are days you’ll go out instead of waiting longer to leave,
You’ll go further between fuel stops so have greater freedom in planning.
You’ll carry more stores, toys, tools, spares etc. so will have more freedom and perhaps a greater quality of life as regards creature comforts.
Would suggest it’s just the opposite as regards size than suggested above. Bigger boats are easier to handle at slow speeds. Given weight, stern and bow thrusters, inertia things happen slower and they are more predictable . Being more stable and larger it’s easier to move around. Slow is pro.
We cruised for 8 years as mom and pop but that second head and stateroom was a blessing. She had hers. I had mine. That was true for heads, closets, lockers etc. If necessary we could both shower at the same time or go potty. Same with the stateroom. Allowed a lot of extra storage even keeping some locker and closet space open for guests.
Yes, there’s an increase in maintenance costs but between 36’ and 42’ think it’s overstated. You have the same scale for things like HVAC. It’s not like needing massive air handlers. Same with galley components, watermakers, entertainment, navigation or any of the other systems. Fluids and filters are a bit bigger but cost is comparable.
So the significant difference is slips, and storage. Answer is stay out of marinas and short haul for bottoms.
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Old 05-01-2022, 02:00 PM   #50
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We've owned our 36CL for 5 years now and if we were just going to continue to cruise the local PNW by ourselves we probably wouldn't have upgraded. It's a very simple boat and with the single JD6404 and a bowthruster I can get into any slip I can fit in. Awesome boat. Even at todays prices if you can afford moorage, you can afford fuel. Maintenance is inexpensive as long as you're doing the simple stuff, oil changes and normal upkeep. Running gear is as cheap as it's going to get for a boat of this type. JD and Lehman engines will run forever if well maintiained, ie clean fuel and oil.


At 6'2" I bump around a bit but it's not terrible with 2 aboard. Add 1 or 2 adults and you'll want a 42.


We own both a 36 and a 49 at the moment. 49 is our retirement job and 36 is for sale soon.
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Old 05-01-2022, 02:36 PM   #51
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Our little input from this side of the pond.
Its known here as 'the 3 foot syndrome', and you often hear the comments 'Jeez wouldn't it be great if this boat was just 3 feet wider/longer' etc think of the comfort and the space.
Buy the biggest boat that you can handle as a couple and solo in an emergency.
Again it all comes down to you and your lifestyle, are you flash gadget man ? Speed freak ? Weekend sailor ? Party freak ? Planning for your retirement ?
I lived and cruised extensively quite happily on a single engine aft cabin Birchwood 33' for nearly 30 years.
On my way to Spain I got captured by a French lady, 2 years later we sold the 33' for a good profit and bought a single engined 42'.
We've lived contented on her for the last 12 years, but if I won the lotto ?
When buying a boat there are 2 maxims to follow.
Buy with the wallet not the heart, 'cause one day you'll sell her.
Do your research thoroughly. Measure twice cut once.
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Old 05-01-2022, 06:53 PM   #52
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Since the unnamed rule maker decided the swim platform must be included in the OAL, no longer can we make a decision on AOL without knowing the year.
Example, my boat was purchased and documented as 34.5 ft. Then magically, over night, it became a 36.5ft because the swim platform was added in. The hull is the same.
I asked the builder why the sudden change. His answer was straight forward, because we can charge more and everyone just followed along.

Soooooo, if you have 2footites, the newer boat ..... are all automatically taking care of that.
I sort of wish I bought an older 41ft AT. Now the newer ATs are called it 43ft boat I think ??

You have to be careful of what you buying when it comes to AOL. maybe the WLL will become more important ????
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Old 05-01-2022, 08:04 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
Since the unnamed rule maker decided the swim platform must be included in the OAL, no longer can we make a decision on AOL without knowing the year.
Example, my boat was purchased and documented as 34.5 ft. Then magically, over night, it became a 36.5ft because the swim platform was added in. The hull is the same.
I asked the builder why the sudden change. His answer was straight forward, because we can charge more and everyone just followed along.

Soooooo, if you have 2footites, the newer boat ..... are all automatically taking care of that.
I sort of wish I bought an older 41ft AT. Now the newer ATs are called it 43ft boat I think ??

You have to be careful of what you buying when it comes to AOL. maybe the WLL will become more important ????
You know the WLL went up 2 feet at the same time, as the mold now includes the swimgrid?
In the GB re-measurement, the 42 used to be hull length, but in the 47, now includes the swimgrid (molded in) and the pulpit (also molded in). So the WLL went up by including the swimgrid, but not the pulpit.
The price is more of a Supply v Demand thing.
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Old 05-01-2022, 09:59 PM   #54
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Our neat little 1977, twin screw, 34' x 12'6" Tolly tri cabin came to life pre computer chips and pre adding swim step onto LOA - Thank God!! For two people comfort; with, occasional two guests + baby [= 4.5 people] she's simply just right!

Easy for one to handle, inexpensive to maintain/dock/operate. Built like a brick shht house with room galore, and, Keeps Her [already bottomed-out] Value! What more can the occasional, part time relax-n'-swim senior boater couple ask for!!! Nutten!!!
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Old 05-02-2022, 12:10 AM   #55
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Our Formula 41 measures 41 with the swim platform but without the pulpit when added makes it a 43’. But then we put a swim platform extension on so now LOA is 45’. But since we dock ar our house it doesn’t really matter except in winter storage, they charge me for 43’ due to the swim platform extension.
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Old 05-02-2022, 12:15 AM   #56
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We have had a GB 36 for 12 years and love her. Single screw, which I wanted and love. Wouldn't want twin screw. I think of her as a cozy mountain cabin.
I have heard there are single GB 42's, mostly in the NW, and would fly to see one. I think GB was brilliant in this design as everything is the same except just that much larger, which I might really like. But it still has to be a single screw which I haven't found. I wish they made any of them with paravanes, and we'd love a center island berth. There's no room for any sort of real stabilization in a 36 with out making the ER a nightmare.

If anyone has a single screw GB 42, please contact me. I'd be motivated.
I have no relationship with this GB or the seller but saw this on Yachtworld.

https://www.yachtworld.com/yacht/199...assic-8226318/
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Old 05-08-2022, 08:15 AM   #57
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All boats are too big on the hard and too small in the ocean. Size means more surface area so more wok. But size means higher speeds, more storage, greater safety usually and more comforts.

Though out the years my rule has been. Weekend warrior any size will serve. Smaller is better as less work and cost. Easier to dock so less stressful when by yourself.
Seasonal coastal cruiser in WE or 1-2 week stretches 36-40’ serves adequately.
Full time or long term cruiser 40’ and above. There’s never enough storage on a boat. Range is always a concern. Creature comforts become a big deal as does self sufficiency. Yes smaller will serve but you get into the camping v living argument with the bride. Remember happy wife=happy life.
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Old 05-08-2022, 08:27 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
Since the unnamed rule maker decided the swim platform must be included in the OAL, no longer can we make a decision on AOL without knowing the year.
Example, my boat was purchased and documented as 34.5 ft. Then magically, over night, it became a 36.5ft because the swim platform was added in. The hull is the same.
I asked the builder why the sudden change. His answer was straight forward, because we can charge more and everyone just followed along.

Soooooo, if you have 2footites, the newer boat ..... are all automatically taking care of that.
I sort of wish I bought an older 41ft AT. Now the newer ATs are called it 43ft boat I think ??

You have to be careful of what you buying when it comes to AOL. maybe the WLL will become more important ????

The new lengths are a bit more accurate. On older boats, they often used the LOD, but listed it as the LOA. So they were claiming the LOA as the length of the hull mold without bolt-ons. But that's not really LOA. If you look at the detailed specs for boats, some builders just list LOA and LWL on new stuff, some also list either LOD or "hull length" to give a good idea of how much actual space it has. AT seems to only list LOA and LWL, but Beneteau lists all 3 on their sailboats, for example.



Example: My boat was sold as 38 feet. It's actually 38' LOD (length of the hull mold across the deck). LWL is 33'6". Measured true LOA including the swim platform and pulpit is 42'4". If sold now, it would be called a 42 or 43 most likely.
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Old 05-08-2022, 10:22 AM   #59
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Originally Posted by rslifkin View Post
The new lengths are a bit more accurate. On older boats, they often used the LOD, but listed it as the LOA. So they were claiming the LOA as the length of the hull mold without bolt-ons. But that's not really LOA. If you look at the detailed specs for boats, some builders just list LOA and LWL on new stuff, some also list either LOD or "hull length" to give a good idea of how much actual space it has. AT seems to only list LOA and LWL, but Beneteau lists all 3 on their sailboats, for example.



Example: My boat was sold as 38 feet. It's actually 38' LOD (length of the hull mold across the deck). LWL is 33'6". Measured true LOA including the swim platform and pulpit is 42'4". If sold now, it would be called a 42 or 43 most likely.
LOA [including pulpit and swim step] makes sense for a boat yard/marina calculating room occupied when boat is wet or on the hard... caus after all... that is the length of "rental" space being occupied by the boat. However... for using a boat [either regarding its capability in sea conditions and/or inside room for comfortable living-aboard] I believe the deck length from stem to stern should be utilized. Caus, after all... if you remove the pulpit and swim step... you have little change of the boat's seakeeping ability or live-aboard comfort.
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Old 05-08-2022, 12:30 PM   #60
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LOA [including pulpit and swim step] makes sense for a boat yard/marina calculating room occupied when boat is wet or on the hard... caus after all... that is the length of "rental" space being occupied by the boat. However... for using a boat [either regarding its capability in sea conditions and/or inside room for comfortable living-aboard] I believe the deck length from stem to stern should be utilized. Caus, after all... if you remove the pulpit and swim step... you have little change of the boat's seakeeping ability or live-aboard comfort.
That's where I appreciate manufacturers that publish all 3 length figures.
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