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Old 02-09-2020, 10:13 AM   #101
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I own a 1987 42' Roughwater. My tanks appear to be aluminum.
Thanks. I've seen several broker write ups where they mention tanks being replaced. This boat definitely has fiberglass tanks ( looking at it again today), just makes one wonder why and how?

Btw, your overall opinion of your 42'? Anything that surprised you after buying it?

Thanks
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Old 02-09-2020, 10:38 AM   #102
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I really like the boat. Great use of space, headroom, lots of storage especially the inside closets in the aft stateroom. Handles well, great visibility from the pilothouse for docking etc. No negative surprises. Not everyone seems to be a fan of the 8.2 Detroit diesels, but they have given me no problem.

I was looking at an old ad for another RW 42 and it had Fiberglass tanks listed. The name of the boat was "Plan Sea"

Hope my rambling helps
Jim
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Old 02-09-2020, 06:59 PM   #103
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My Roughwater is a 29 foot, and it has fiberglass fuel tanks but I have never seen another Roughwater. As near as I know I have the only one of any size in eastern Canada. The 29 was built in Korea and only 12 were built. We have owned Waymaker for 12 years and have done many upgrades. We have always been happy with her , usually getting questions and comments wherever we go. Gary.
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Old 05-07-2020, 03:21 PM   #104
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Hi all - thanks for the very informative thread!

I'm likely going to be taking a look at a 1975 Roughwater 35 in Newport CA tomorrow - any comments on suitability for summer family SoCal coastal cruising? Wife and I in the v-berth, 3 girls (6,10,12) in the aft cabin is what I'm thinking. We're coming from a 40' sailboat. Has a re-built 1991 Perkins 6.354 and looks to be well loved.

Let me know if there's anything in particular I should look for. Bit worried about headroom as I'm 6'2" but it could be a great compact & efficient boat for the price. Love the way she looks too.
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Old 05-07-2020, 03:25 PM   #105
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Nice boats! Previous owners care will dictate how well it surveys and overall condition. Be glad it has the Perkins engine rather than the Detroit 8.2's which they put in a lot of RW's.
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Old 05-07-2020, 03:29 PM   #106
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Hi all - thanks for the very informative thread!

I'm likely going to be taking a look at a 1975 Roughwater 35 in Newport CA tomorrow - any comments on suitability for summer family SoCal coastal cruising? Wife and I in the v-berth, 3 girls (6,10,12) in the aft cabin is what I'm thinking. We're coming from a 40' sailboat. Has a re-built 1991 Perkins 6.354 and looks to be well loved.

Let me know if there's anything in particular I should look for. Bit worried about headroom as I'm 6'2" but it could be a great compact & efficient boat for the price. Love the way she looks too.
Welcome aboard. Not familiar with that particular boat but they do seem to have a good reputation. Get a good survey and have a lot of fun.
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Old 07-21-2020, 12:35 AM   #107
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Achilles heel or maintain-able?

My wife and I are considering our return to boating with a Roughwater 37 or 41. We had a Canoe Cove 41 for 8 years but we love the lines of a Roughwater and the simpler single engine to maintain. The one part that is holding us back are the rumors of trouble between the glass hull and the marine ply upper. Does anyone here have any experience with this? We would need to keep it outside but I am pretty on top of maintenance - assuming there are things I can do to avoid rot once it surveys well. All thoughts welcome and I am not sure if I should have started this as a new thread (couldn't figure that out) so advice welcome there too! Thanks,

Erik
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Old 07-21-2020, 02:59 AM   #108
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These do have plywood deck houses that were reasonably well built. My Willard 36, like all pre-1980s Willards, has a plywood deck house with heavy glass over, more or less a female mold that was not removed. Willards have their faults, but rotting deck houses is not one of them.

A good friend and knowledgeable boater had a R37 for years. He always lamented selling her, so much so that he bought a replacement last year. He had it trucked from PNW to San Diego and had to remove the flybridge. He decided not to reinstall it and I have to say it's a great looking boat without the FB. Handles much better without the weight aloft. Lower helm station is very good.

I almost bought a R41 25 years ago. Unusual layout but functional. Those did seem to suffer more deck house rot than the R37, but thats only a passing observation of a few. Roughwater have a devoted following. I'm sure there are knowledgeable resources.

I like the R37. Not crazy about the larger twins in most, but I do like the boats traditional styling. Very nice for a couple. And very good hull design from Monk Sr

Peter
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Old 07-21-2020, 08:34 AM   #109
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My wife and I are considering our return to boating with a Roughwater 37 or 41. We had a Canoe Cove 41 for 8 years but we love the lines of a Roughwater and the simpler single engine to maintain. The one part that is holding us back are the rumors of trouble between the glass hull and the marine ply upper. Does anyone here have any experience with this? We would need to keep it outside but I am pretty on top of maintenance - assuming there are things I can do to avoid rot once it surveys well. All thoughts welcome and I am not sure if I should have started this as a new thread (couldn't figure that out) so advice welcome there too! Thanks,

Erik
I looked hard for a roughwater a few years back. I was after the 41 because I wanted a full time liveaboard / cruiser. All of the boats I looked at had lots of rot. If you're really serious I suggest you try to find one that's been kept under cover most of her life and be willing to pay a premium for that.

What I observed was the windows leak so a boat that has not been kept under cover is almost certain to have rot in the cabin sides. Pretty easy to spot leakers with the typical water stains and efforts to disguise same. A bit of gentle tapping with a smooth faced hammer will tell you if there is a lot of rot. I won't call myself a surveyor by any means but I've learned enough to determine on my own if it's worth a professional surveyor's cost.

Another issue is the way the cabin sides join deck. It looks to me like that is a joint asking for trouble. I've never pulled that joint apart but it looks like looks like the cabin side runs down past the deck edge, so leaks there and the both the cabin side and deck are saturated. More tappity-tap along that joint, both house and deck, is called for.

As you inspect the interior open all of the drawers, cabinets and slide outs you can to view the house to deck joint. On the Roughwater 41s I looked at it's a bunch of wood blocks used to fasten hull to deck. On one I could stick my finger into soft spongy wood on many of the blocks. I don't recall that joint on the 37s but it's probably the same.

That's all I can think of that in my experience is unique to Roughwaters. You'll still need to keep an eye out for all the old boat issues. Such as soft decks from improperly bedded hardware, old fuel tanks, old wiring and all the endless old boat stuff.

In the end I just couldn't find a Roughwater that wasn't going to be a huge expense to bring her back to shape for extensive cruising. Too bad because I love the looks and design. Especially the 37 though I was mostly after the 41 for living space.

Comments on doing you own pre-survey inspection looking for water damage.

Tap testing. Ask permission from the owner and broker before you start. And be sure to use a hammer that won't leave marks. I got a nylon hammer at Harbor Freight with no sharp edges. I'm sure a surveyor would rather use a metal faced hammer but as I said I'm trying to eliminate boats that are too far gone to be worth the cost of a survey.

You can use a moisture meter as well but without a lot of experience the results may not be accurate. Here are 3 links to well written pieces on the use of moisture meters.

Understanding the Moisture Meter on Marine How To a well respected source of information. This article is very positive on the use of moisture meters.

Next up is Moisture Meter Mythology from another highly regarded source. The author is not as positive about the value of moisture meters.

Quite a difference of opinion between these two experts. In the for what it's worth column I purchased the meter discussed in Understanding the Moisture Meter and used it on several boats I rejected. Then one day I wanted to see a boat but my meter was not at hand. So I dashed off to Home Depot and purchased a meter similar to the one discussed in Moisture Meter Mythology.

I have since compared the results from both meters used side by side. My recommendation is to buy the less expensive one. Keeping in mind that unless you are an experienced surveyor you may not really know how to interpret the readings.

And finally The Use and Misuse of Moisture Meters where you will find this "A major benefit of the moisture meter is in its use for locating moisture penetration areas around through-hull fittings and deck hardware. A quick check with the meter can find evidence of moisture around fittings with good assurance that there is a potential problem unless the item in question is pulled and at least rebedded with a marine grade sealant." So I keep my miosture meter to do annual checks on deck hardware bedding.
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Old 07-21-2020, 12:36 PM   #110
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Roughwater (reply to Portage_Bay)

Thank you Portage_Bay. Great info. I always wondered on those glass to ply house connections why there wasn't some type of reverse lip in the glass (like a bath tub install where the bottom row of tile overlaps the tub so that last row is irrelevant in terms of sealing). Roughwaters are great looking boats but covered moorage is not an option for me so I am going to come up with another plan. Island Gypsy maybe or mvweebles (replied to me also) has a Willard 36... they look nice. The joy of kicking hypothetical tires. Thanks again.

Erik
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Old 03-30-2022, 02:10 PM   #111
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Roughwater

Iíd like to find out if anyone knows of a surveyor who has experience with Roughwater boats? Iíd like to find a 1984 or newer Roughwater 41 somewhere on the Loop. I realize it is more likely to find expertise with this manufacturer on the West coast and I am willing to pay extra travel expenses for an expert Iíd be comfortable with. Plan is to try and find a R41 that would need no or little work in order to be a half time live aboard while slowly traveling the loop. If I canít find a RW41 that fits the bill before Winter of 2022, I plan to widen search to include Monk 36 trawlers. I have owned small boats most of my life. The thought of purchasing a trawler built in the 1980ís is a little overwhelming and any help with pointing to expertise is appreciated. Thank you.
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Old 05-02-2022, 05:16 PM   #112
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Hiya John Newbie - check the post by Portage_Bay above - some good general things to look at on RW boats, and most late 70’s early 80’s Taiwanese made trawlers.
Finding a RW “expert” surveyor, or even one very familiar is tough anywhere. The good thing is the RW is fairly typical of the era Taiwan was cranking out fiberglass trawlers. So the fiberglass hull issues, cabin sides (cored) rot under windows, electrical issues and the Perkins Diesel engines are all pretty darn similar across the board. I’d look for a surveyor who has a lot of experience/expertise in the era/type rather than RW specific IMO.
My 1980 RW41 has a solid hull, topsides are in good shape and is mechanically sound. The rest (a long list of mostly electrical upgrades, rewiring, cosmetic maintenance inside & out and plumbing) are all things I do as time & money permit. The rest of the time my wife & I live aboard, cruise the Channel Islands (California) and enjoy the heck out of her.
Best wishes in your search!
Ed
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Old 05-05-2022, 12:17 PM   #113
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Thank you Ed and Portage_Bay; Your information makes since and if a RW shows up in East half of US that appears survey worthy, I’ll find a surveyor with Taiwanese trawler experience. Good luck with your RW41 repair/upgrades, I appreciate your insight.
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Old 05-07-2022, 02:38 PM   #114
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Rw41

Rw41
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Old 05-10-2022, 09:03 PM   #115
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Nice looking boat, thanks again.
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