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Old 10-11-2020, 11:23 AM   #1
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Pilot Fuel Lines

hi all,

we have a 2003 pilot 34. the fittings at the ends of main engine fuel lines have become severly rusted. i'm pretty sure i will be replacing them before next season.

the questions i have are: 1) has anyone done this. 2) are replacement lines available or is this a custom job. 3) what kind of shop would make them up. 4) are steel connectors standard hardware.

thanks in advance,
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Old 10-11-2020, 11:29 AM   #2
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i wasn't clear in my post. i'm talking about the big, approximately 2", rubber lines which connect to the tank on each side and the t which joins them to the line connecting to the racor.
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Old 10-11-2020, 01:08 PM   #3
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Can you post a good picture?
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Old 10-12-2020, 02:55 PM   #4
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Pilot Fuel Lines

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the t appears to be bronze or something other than plain steel. also there has never been any water in that area, since we've had the boat, so i'm not sure where the rust came from.
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Old 10-12-2020, 08:00 PM   #5
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Those look like hydraulic fitting so hie ye off to an hydraulic shop. Ask for stainless fittings this time or spooge steel fittings with Por15.
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Old 10-13-2020, 12:48 PM   #6
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so are hydraulic fittings std? since it's not under pressure, why not just fuel line and barbs?
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Old 10-13-2020, 02:02 PM   #7
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so are hydraulic fittings std? since it's not under pressure, why not just fuel line and barbs?
The hydraulic fittings and hoses are very durable, steel lined hoses and heavy duty fittings, won't pinch or collapse, last a lot longer with less chance of a leak. You can step on it, drop a battery on it, or try to cut it with a knife and it won't puncture it. They will tolerate heat better than simple fuel line.

The ones you have pictured are reusable type fittings, the hose can be removed and replaced. Since yours are so corroded, replacing them with the same will be fairly expensive, the fittings are $15-$50 each depending on size and style and hose is also fairly expensive.

A hydraulic shop can make hosesup for you using crimped fittings ($100+ per hose) just take them to a hydraulic shop and you can walk out with nearly identical replacements.

Alternatively you can purchase the fittings and hose and make them up yourself with the re-usable style fittings. I've not found a hydraulic shop that will make the re-usable style hoses for you, they will only sell the parts and you have to assemble them. In my boat refit thread, I have some part numbers and hose types for making up an oil drain for my engine oil pan, that would all be the same type of stuff.

Making up them yourself will be cheaper of course and you can get the re-usable fittings in stainless steel those will be pricey. To cut the hose, that requires a metal cutting fiber blade mounted in an angle grinder or a metal cutting chop saw with some basic mechanics tools to do the actual assembly, it's a pretty easy process to make up the hoses.
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Old 10-13-2020, 07:15 PM   #8
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Denson tape is also a good way to go to protect steel fittings.
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Those look like hydraulic fitting so hie ye off to an hydraulic shop. Ask for stainless fittings this time or spooge steel fittings with Por15.
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Old 10-13-2020, 07:31 PM   #9
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Denso not Denson. Auto correct got me again. Also called petro tape
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Denson tape is also a good way to go to protect steel fittings.
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Old 10-14-2020, 07:45 AM   #10
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does anyone think they are salvageable? if yes, what would be the best approach?
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Old 10-14-2020, 07:56 AM   #11
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does anyone think they are salvageable? if yes, what would be the best approach?

I think they should be replaced. A fuel leak is nothing to mess with.
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Old 10-14-2020, 08:56 AM   #12
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If you get new hoses or make your own make sure to flush them clean with water. The abrasive saw or hack saw used to cut the hose will leave metal filings in the hose.
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Old 10-14-2020, 08:57 AM   #13
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does anyone think they are salvageable? if yes, what would be the best approach?

IMO the best approach is to replace anything that looks like that. Those are very rusted and a fuel leak is not something to trifle with.


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Old 10-15-2020, 08:54 PM   #14
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does anyone think they are salvageable? if yes, what would be the best approach?


They are not salvageable. Take the hoses to a hydraulic hose shop and they will make you a replacement. Just do a search “ hydraulic hoses near me”
Your hoses are replaceable fittings. I would not use them unless you are really familiar with assembling hoses and obviously you’re not.
Just tell the shop these are low pressure hoses for diesel.
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Old 10-15-2020, 09:00 PM   #15
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does anyone think they are salvageable? if yes, what would be the best approach?
Definitely not salvageable if you try to take them apart. The options are to leave them alone, or replace them. Replacing with similar type is going to be pretty expensive but would certainly be recommended. Any hydraulic shop can make up a duplicate assembly of hoses and fittings easily if you don't want to tackle it on your own. I would paint the new ones well before installation and touch up any tool marks in the paint after installing so you don't end up with the same thing in a couple of years.
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Old 10-15-2020, 11:46 PM   #16
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I have rubber hoses and clamps on my ancient Lehmans.
Swaged fittings on hydraulic hose are a lot safer, sturdier, more reliable, less leak prone, etc etc.
There are specialty shops that do nothing but fabricate hoses for construction equipment. Start there. As mentioned, some paint and raise them up off the fg will give you another 10 or 20 years.
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Old 10-16-2020, 02:10 AM   #17
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Just rebuilt the last part of my fuel system. All in stainless. Cleaned the tanks at the same time discovering dissolved rubber because of incorrect gasket material..better now then in a seaway.Click image for larger version

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Old 10-18-2020, 08:00 AM   #18
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The hoses and fittings are made by Eaton Aeroquip. They are aircraft hoses but obviously can be used anywhere. Absolutely the best quality. Seems like overkill on our Pilots. Mine rusted in the same location. I had them checked by a mechanic who said it was just surface rust. I cleaned them up with a brass brush and some rust remover and they looked much better. I coated them with a rust protection product. I keep an eye on them and may replace in the future. Any good hydraulic shop should be able to help you out. As others have said it’s an expensive project but a fuel leak will cost you more.
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Old 10-18-2020, 01:43 PM   #19
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I’m a Newbie searching to purchase a Pilot 30-II, and while I’m unable to comment on this fuel line posting I have a question for the group regarding life expectancy of aluminum fuel tanks on MS Pilots.


In my original search for MS trawlers and now that I’m searching for a Pilots
30, I’ve found that numerous listings for boats around the 15 year old point have “new” aluminum fuel tanks. Two weeks ago I met a 2002 MS 390 trawler owner at a marina and during our discussion he complained about a leaking tank. And a 2004 Pilot 30-II owner whom I’ve been fortunate to hook up with told me he just had to replace his port fuel tank and had to remove the engine to do so.

Is this normal for aluminum fuel tanks, such that I should be limiting my search to purchase a 30 with new fuel tanks in order to avoid a major expense?

I haven’t found a thread on this forum that addresses this for aluminum tanks.

Any experience or comments would be appreciated.
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Old 10-18-2020, 03:29 PM   #20
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Quote:
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Denson tape is also a good way to go to protect steel fittings.
Why have anything ferrous in the system? My somewhat similar Pilot came with all hose, barbs, and brass valves; same setup I had on my trawler. That installation photo is the ugliest mess I have seen for a fuel system. Start over from scratch.
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