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Old 02-19-2018, 12:39 PM   #21
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Which is the most desired boat , the 39 ft or the 400 mainship?
Which one best suits your tastes, needs and wants? That's the one you go for.
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Old 02-19-2018, 01:27 PM   #22
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I definitely prefer the 400 but it's generally far more expensive than the 39. 39 is more realistic for my budget.

I'll probably end up with a sedan cruiser but I'm trying to keep my options open.
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Old 02-20-2018, 02:21 PM   #23
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Thanks and that will be a mindset that I fully enjoy - when I'm retired. I simply do not have that luxury today. I don't live on the water - I'm 4 hours without traffic - 5 on summer weekends - from the boat. My cruising grounds are isolated. "Nearby" destinations are 75 - 100 miles away. At 15 or 18 knots I can realistically travel somewhere and return (with safety margin) in a 3 day weekend. At 7 or 8 I simply can't.

They put the 440 in there so that people could do that. I was simply wondering what it is about that engine that would lead Ski to conclude that. I highly respect his opinion.
You'd be better off with a Sportfish or an express. You're not going to get close to 18k with a trawler.
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Old 02-20-2018, 03:26 PM   #24
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Neither sportfish nor express cruisers meet my criteria. I'm primarily looking at Sedan cruisers - Ocean Alexander 42 Sedan is top on my list for example. But from a layout perspective there's no important difference between the OA and the Mainship. They both have two cabins, a salon, a cockpit, and a large flybridge. I wasn't considering a Mainship with a semi-displacement hull a "trawler". It's just a boat that is styled like a trawler.

I'm aware of the typical performance of these models, and 18 WOT is what Powerboat Guide provides as a guide for the 390 with twin Yanmar 230s, so I think one can "get close to 18k with a trawler" - at least a semi displacement one like this. My question was not whether I could reach that speed with the single 440. My question was why Ski made the comment to "avoid the 440". Perhaps I should just PM him instead. I just thought others might be interested in the rationale too.
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Old 02-21-2018, 02:46 PM   #25
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Please consider keeping it in the forum. Others can benefit. No offense was intended. An innocent comment with limited information.
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Old 02-22-2018, 07:48 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by BDofMSP View Post
Thanks and that will be a mindset that I fully enjoy - when I'm retired. I simply do not have that luxury today. I don't live on the water - I'm 4 hours without traffic - 5 on summer weekends - from the boat. My cruising grounds are isolated. "Nearby" destinations are 75 - 100 miles away. At 15 or 18 knots I can realistically travel somewhere and return (with safety margin) in a 3 day weekend. At 7 or 8 I simply can't.

They put the 440 in there so that people could do that. I was simply wondering what it is about that engine that would lead Ski to conclude that. I highly respect his opinion.
Here's my basis for not recommending the 420/440 6LY2 series:

The 6ly (up to 370hp) is about 5.2liter at 3300rpm. It has dry cylinder liners that can be replaced.

The 6ly2 (up to 440hp) is nearly the same engine, but bored out to 5.8liter without replaceable cylinder liners. The bores are hardened so engine can not be bored oversize should a piston/cylinder failure occur. Should that happen, block replacement ($$$$) is required.

Both are very well made engines and if not overloaded have a good reputation. But there is a liability of a low probability 6ly2 failure that that could bite you for big bucks.

If the 6ly can give you the cruise speed you want without pushing it too hard, I'd go that route. Should be able to make 3350-3400 full power and cruise ok at 2900.

If the 6ly needs to work too hard for desired speed, it may be preferable to go 6ly2 as with the larger displacement it would not need to work too hard.

Guess I am not condemning the 6ly2, just that if the ly can do it, it is preferred.
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Old 02-22-2018, 08:14 AM   #27
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That makes a lot of sense, and is a great insight. Perfect example of why I stick with this forum year after year. Thanks Ski!
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Old 02-22-2018, 08:31 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by BDofMSP View Post
I'm aware of the typical performance of these models, and 18 WOT is what Powerboat Guide provides as a guide for the 390 with twin Yanmar 230s
You might want to talk to owners of the model to get some real-world information. For example, while my 34T will do 16 knots at WOT it is not happy there--twitchy with a propensity to bow-steer.
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Old 02-22-2018, 03:21 PM   #29
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Good advice. If I decide to add this boat to my list I'll definitely have to do that. I've recently reviewed several other threads here on these boats and I'm beginning to see that this is probably not a good candidate to fill my needs though.
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Old 11-11-2018, 03:41 PM   #30
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We bought a 2001 390 this year. A well maintained 390 is a lot of boat for the money.
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Old 02-27-2019, 02:03 PM   #31
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390 or 400

We have a 390 and like everything about it with the exception of no dedicated eating area in the salon. The former owner had a futon type sofa which is very uncomfortable except for sleeping. We will replace it eventually. I am currently working on a design for an acceptable eating sitting area. I loved the 400, with it's spacious salon and flybridge, but couldn't quite justify the extra $50,000.
Good luck.
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Old 02-27-2019, 02:18 PM   #32
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This looks to be a very nice maintained 390
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Old 02-27-2019, 07:41 PM   #33
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I've not spent a lot of time on a 400 so cannot talk intelligently about the operation and handling. We have a 390 and are very happy with the boat. The 390 was originally built as a 350 with a molded in swim platform. Mainship decided to add the platform into the overall length. The 400 with a bolt on platform does not have it added to the length So the 400 is actually 3' longer than the 390. That 3' is in the salon. the staterooms and head are almost identical. I was on a 2003 400 and we have a 2003 390 and the staterooms are identical on those. Both boats have a 14' 3" beam. The walk arounds on the 400 are the same on both sides, the 390 has a step up and down on the starboard side. The 400 also has wider overhangs on the sides of the flybridge. When Mainship was designing the 400 they poled 390 owners to see what they liked and disliked about their boats. They used this info when designing the 400. So I guess you could say that the 400 is an upgraded 390. That said, the 400 is considerably more expensive than a 390 so if you cannot afford the upgrade and can only afford a 390 you still get a great boat.
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Old 03-04-2019, 05:19 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cjsangster View Post
Which is the most desired boat , the 39 ft or the 400 mainship?
We were looking for a 39 but when we saw the 400, we were instantly in love! The 40 is definitely more expensive, but the amenities and style!!

We ended up biting the bullet and buying the 400 last year and we are so glad we did!

We heard from our boat broker that with the 400, Mainship listened to its customers and added everything on the wishlist, including cherry cabinets and a gorgeous dining table.

Good luck with your purchase, but look at the 400 first!

Vickie aka Gouchergal
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Old 03-13-2019, 09:04 AM   #35
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Mainship 390 experience/advice

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Originally Posted by jgreene69 View Post
I'm currently in the market for a 1997-2005 model year Mainship 390. I want a single engine. Looking at Yanmars 300-380 hp. Any experience or advise would be appreciated before I pull the trigger..
A few thoughts after (1) spending two years researching and looking at seven different MS390's beginning in 2012, (2) owning, cruising and maintaining our 2003 MS390 since 2014.

- Buy the newest model-year 390 you can find and afford. The list of improvements and design fixes made over the years is very long. Beginnning in model year 2003 (production beginning in late 2002), all of the fixes and upgrades were incorporated. The 2003 upgrade from aluminum to stainless steel hardware (rails, portlights, etc.) is one of many. The new swim-platform/bustle design is also important. If you have a broker-friend who will run a 'sold boats' report for you on Yachtworld, you will see that the 2003 and newer years are fetching substantially higher prices than 2002 and older. When I last had the report run, the difference was 15-20%.

- Make sure you find a surveyor who has surveyed many of the 350/390 models. In Florida that shouldn't be hard.

- Be very careful in understanding any previous repairs that have been done. Be especially wary of quickie 'make-it-ready-for-sale' repairs. A careful owner will have excellent knowledge of repairs that were done, and I am >>not<< talking about reciepts, but rather detailed descriptions of the repairs with before and after photos and methods used.

- Especially if you are looking at pre-2003 models, learn about all of the various 350/390 issues including the exhaust system, swim-platform, mast base and Caterpillar 3116/3126 history.

- A really nice thing about the 350/390 design is the relative scarcity of screw holes drilled into horizontal (cored) deck surfaces, there are VERY few. As a result...compared to other Mainship models (and most boats in general) the occurance of soft deck problems in 350/390s is quite rare. One look at how they screwed the flybridge railings into the fiberglass (using high-and-dry 'saddle' design) tells that story. This was an expensive design choice, but well worth it, there is simply NO way for water to stand on those screw holes and soak in there. That said...if previous owners have screwed anything into the decks anywhere on the boat, make sure it was well sealed and that your surveyor scrutinizes it carefully.

- Closely examine the cabin sole under the refrigerator, especially in carpeted boats. Mainship made a very poor choice to 'toenail' screw the port/aft cabinet to the sole pretty much right under the refrigerator, creating an unsealed entry point into the plywood in >>exactly<< the place that moldy refrigerator/freezer condensate water would drain following a refrigerator failure or power outage. If you can't pull up the carpet, carefully inspect the sole from underneath (you will need to move the foil-over-foam acoustic insulation located above the port fuel tank). I have seen this on several 350/390's.

- Remove the two small drain-covers from the scuppers at the aft of the flybridge and make sure the edges of the 2.5" thick plywood coring there are well sealed. Make sure the sealant extends all the way down into the stanchion tube (which serves as the scupper drain). One of mine was not sealed, but since I am always paranoid about anything screwed or cut into a horizontal deck surface, I sealed it right after buying the boat.

- Note: Final assembly of the MS350/390's was performed by the DEALER, not by Mainship! This included installing the upper "half' of the flybridge, the table, the mast and all the hardware on the flybridge including the bimini. Most of the leaks I have seen on MS350/390s (including ours) were the result of poor workmanship by the delivery dealer, not by Mainship.


- Our Yanmar 6LYA-STP (370hp) has been fantastic. The Cummins 6BTA would be my second choice. I saw comments about the 6LY2, and while I can appreciate Ski's objections, I am not aware that any MS390's were ever made with that engine, at least none I ever encountered.


Hope this helps.
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Old 03-14-2019, 10:39 PM   #36
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I believe all the single engine 350/390's had a bow thruster standard


Correct, all of the singles came with the thruster standard.
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:16 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
Look for the Yanmar 6ly 370-ish hp or Cummins 6BTA 330 or 370. Avoid the 6LY2 420 or 440. Cat 3116 or 3126 ok, but not the preferred engine. Avoid twins on this boat. Make sure you can get to the critical parts of the gennie and that it is not all rusted up.

Did Mainship ever put 6LY2's in the 390's? I didn't think so.


The 6LYA in our 2003 390 has been excellent.



Avoid twins! Agree...way too cramped to work on them.



re: "Make sure you can get to the critical parts of the gennie..."



The only genset I ever saw in a 350/390 was the Kohler 8E0Z. At first glance, it would appear that access for service/maintenence would be a problem, but I've been able to get to everything, although replacing the thermostat was a real PITA.



Have you seen other generators in these boats?
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Old 03-15-2019, 08:12 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by Cjsangster View Post
Which is the most desired boat , the 39 ft or the 400 mainship?
The 400 by a LOT, however, comes with a price. If my attachment works, here's an article about the differences between the 400 and the 390.

While there's a ton of improvements, it doesn't make the 390 a bad boat. On my recent Loop trip I ended up with several friends with the 390 or 400 and had plenty of time to discuss differences. All were happy with their boat.

The performance is so close with all of the singles, it would be hard to compare. I've operated the 390 a bit and couldn't tell the difference with the 400.

The Mainship is not a boat to by for speed, even the twin version. But the twins will give some speed when needed, perhaps up to 15 knots. The singles, much harder to get any speed out of, perhaps 10 to 12 knots and then you're pushing water. My 400 empty would top out at 15.5 knots, but not even close to a realistic cruise speed.

The inspection on the sole (mentioned above) is a important place to look. I can't comment about the genny in the 390, but on my 400 I had to remove the cover to service it, and ain't putting that damn thing back on.

Overall, the Mainship is a very popular boat. I call it the "Chevy" of boats. Easy to buy, easy to own and operate, and easy to sell, and simple. And has a lot of nice creature comforts. It's a terrific Loop boat, probably the most popular boat on the loop.
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File Type: pdf Difference 390:400.pdf (165.7 KB, 63 views)
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