Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-09-2018, 10:05 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
City: Orange Beach, AL
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 150
We have a nextgen 3.5kw with just under 200 hours on it. Support and service has been excellent. Run AC 16k, Microwave, electric stove, 4-bank charger, and sat TV without overload. We try to limit running (especially starting) all the loads at once. The Marineaire AC has the soft-start feature that helps. I think I'm around 7K installed. Then next step up almost doubled the price tag. I bought direct from the company in Jacksonville, FL.
hjorgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2018, 10:18 AM   #22
Guru
 
City: Owings, Md
Vessel Name: Graceland
Vessel Model: Mainship 34 MK1
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 1,133
We should be going back in friday but will see you around. The boat is my father's, I do much of the off season maintenance as well as put many hours on it during the summer. It is kept at Ward's Marina on Mill Creek which is a small place run by a family in the pier business, our previous boat was kept there for 17 years. It is down Ward's Rd on the left shortly before you enter the Calvert Marina gate. My folks are ski bums, driving their way back from Utah at the moment. I have been scrambling to barrier coat and paint the bottom between the days of cold weather. Just finished up the last of painting and replacing the stern thruster yesterday (no bow thruster). We have only had it 3 years now but done a fair amount to it and enjoy looking at other ones. Your custom enclosure caught my attention, curious how the windage affects docking.
-Buddy David (son of Bob & Trish)
Gdavid is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2018, 10:51 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Solly's Avatar
 
City: Solomons MD.
Vessel Name: Sun Runner
Vessel Model: 1985 Mainship 34 Trawler MK III
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 488
Your custom enclosure caught my attention, curious how the windage affects docking.
-Buddy David (son of Bob & Trish)[/QUOTE]

I'm sure it'll be a joy to try and dock in the wind !! We are hoping the slip will be a little bit protected.
I'd love to have a stern thruster too along with the bow thruster. Still practice, practice, practice...Have to plan on opening the enclosure up when docking, let the wind blow thru !!
Solly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2018, 12:14 PM   #24
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Sold
Vessel Model: Was an Albin/PSN 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 26,363
just clearing something up about 1800 vs 3600 gensets.... in from the pros...

" An 8kW generator producing 8kW has an engine driving it that produces 8kW plus efficiency losses ... about 11 horsepower. Same-o same-o for both engines. It is very unclear what the guy is trying to say or what he means to tell the readers, if anything.

Just for discussion, a Northern Lights 8kW 1800 rpm generator uses an engine that is rated at maximum output of 15hp. One of the several 3600 rpm 8kW generators that use a Perkins 3600 rpm engine use the Perkins 402D-05G engine rated at just under 14 hp. So, while the maximum power available from the 3600 rpm is slightly less, it means that engine is working at or near its maximum output to obtain the same power from only 2 cylinders and will have a shorter life than the 3 cylinder 1800 rpm unit that is loaded much lower on the output curve. But, not considering efficiency losses, 8kW is 8kW is 8kW or 10.7 horsepower at any rpm."
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2018, 12:22 PM   #25
Valued Technical Contributor
 
DavidM's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 6,473
Yes, you are right. The 3,600 rpm (or 2,800 for belt reduction gensets) engine is working way up on its hp curve vs the 1,800 rpm engine. It is probably producing twice the hp per cubic liter. That is why I only recommended the 2,800 rpm NextGen for light duty. If you are going to run it a lot, say several hundred hours a year, then get a 1,800 rpm genset.

David
DavidM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2018, 01:08 PM   #26
Technical Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 6,194
Really the only thing that really that forces the need for a gennie is AC and heat. Water heater can be plumbed to main engine coolant and fridge, coffee pot, etc can be run off an inverter. Gennies are a PITA, especially if not run often.

If you do go with a gennie, the belt drive Kubota one-banger seems like a good fit. A bit noisy, but tolerable and a compact package.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2018, 02:53 PM   #27
Guru
 
Lepke's Avatar
 
City: Between Oregon and Alaska
Vessel Name: Charlie Harper
Vessel Model: Wheeler Shipyard 83'
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 2,854
A generator running at 1800 makes less noise and lasts longer than one running at 3600. Try to match your generator to a 60-80% load. Otherwise long hours at light loads will glaze the cylinders. It's worthwhile to have a load you can add when running light. Even a heater sat out on deck.
I run my water heater, laundry and water maker when a generator is running.
Lepke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2018, 07:26 PM   #28
Guru
 
foggysail's Avatar
 
City: Ashland, MA
Vessel Model: 1990 Silverton 40 aftcabin
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 1,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
Really the only thing that really that forces the need for a gennie is AC and heat. Water heater can be plumbed to main engine coolant and fridge, coffee pot, etc can be run off an inverter. Gennies are a PITA, especially if not run often.

If you do go with a gennie, the belt drive Kubota one-banger seems like a good fit. A bit noisy, but tolerable and a compact package.
Yes, fridge and coffee can make good useage of an inverter. I presume you must have some means to recharge your batteries without a genny? Note, I didnít read all the posts in this thread so you may have explained earlier that you have a genny and/or solar.

High wattage alternators do work but if at anchor or a mooring, not very efficient
foggysail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2018, 07:55 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Solly's Avatar
 
City: Solomons MD.
Vessel Name: Sun Runner
Vessel Model: 1985 Mainship 34 Trawler MK III
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by foggysail View Post
Yes, fridge and coffee can make good useage of an inverter. I presume you must have some means to recharge your batteries without a genny? Note, I didnít read all the posts in this thread so you may have explained earlier that you have a genny and/or solar.

High wattage alternators do work but if at anchor or a mooring, not very efficient
Only way currently to recharge is by running the main or dockside. We have done w/o a genny for years (another boat). The Mainship had a genny at one time and we were looking at options.
Not a live aboard but looking at anchoring out for several days to a week or at least longer than we have gone before. Although we would probably run-cruise somewhere to another anchorage during that time frame.
As above, I'll have to run the numbers and see how long the batteries will hold up...
Solly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2018, 09:02 PM   #30
Guru
 
foggysail's Avatar
 
City: Ashland, MA
Vessel Model: 1990 Silverton 40 aftcabin
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 1,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Solly View Post
Only way currently to recharge is by running the main or dockside. We have done w/o a genny for years (another boat). The Mainship had a genny at one time and we were looking at options.
Not a live aboard but looking at anchoring out for several days to a week or at least longer than we have gone before. Although we would probably run-cruise somewhere to another anchorage during that time frame.
As above, I'll have to run the numbers and see how long the batteries will hold up...
I have a 7.5KW genny that we use for hot water and cooking while away. I also installed 4 each 295W mono solar panels along with a Victron 150-70 MPPT controller. My batteries are setup as two banks with each consisting of 4 each 215AH GCís.

My point is the solar provides just about all of our power while away from our slip. Heck, we are power pigs with 2 TVs, 8.2 cuft 120VAC fridge with self defrost lights and my list just goes on. IF YOU HAVE THE ROOM for solar, it can make your familyís life far more comfortable and you can avoid running your big engine. Not picking on you at all, just trying to offer a helpful suggestion.
foggysail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2018, 11:14 PM   #31
Guru
 
Simi 60's Avatar
 
City: Queensland
Vessel Model: Milkraft 60 converted timber prawn trawler
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 4,812
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Just for discussion, a Northern Lights 8kW 1800 rpm generator uses an engine that is rated at maximum output of 15hp. ."
Well if that's the case I am feeling pretty good about ours.
7.5 kva with a 3 pot D950 Kubota which is around 20hp depending on which site you believe.
Simi 60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2018, 06:32 AM   #32
Senior Member
 
City: Florida
Vessel Model: 420AC Sea Ray
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 354
All these posts and unless I missed it nobody has mentioned anything about just running a Honda portable generator on the swim platform....


I KID!!!!!!


Honestly though, slap a genny in there and donít look back. One day you may need that air conditioner.
k9medic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2018, 06:40 AM   #33
Guru
 
ranger58sb's Avatar
 
City: Annapolis
Vessel Model: 58' Sedan Bridge
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 6,467
Quote:
Originally Posted by k9medic View Post
All these posts and unless I missed it nobody has mentioned anything about just running a Honda portable generator on the swim platform....

I KID!!!!!!

Honestly though, slap a genny in there and donít look back. One day you may need that air conditioner.

Or... a propane-enabled version of the portable Honda, Yamaha, Hyundai, etc.

Would seem like too much work, to me, compared to flipping the switch on an installed genset... and I'm not sure it would run an aircon... but it's an option.

-Chris
__________________
Chesapeake Bay, USA
ranger58sb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2018, 07:03 AM   #34
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Sold
Vessel Model: Was an Albin/PSN 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 26,363
Honda?....I dont know, unless an all electric boat and you need a couple ACs running.... maybe yes?

Those Hondas have some strong points...

My Honda has had zero maintenance in 18 years of intermediate use and saved my bacon on trips when my big genny went down. Plus it uses a fraction of the fuel. Only oil changes with frighteningly long intervals and doesnt even have a replaceable filter.

Granted it doesnt run big stuff as it is only 1000W, but a 2500W may be in the cards this summer.

It is even wayyyy quieter than my 8KW in a sound shield when the Honda is on the back deck and you arent in the aft cabin bed.

Plus if it stops working you have more options than an installed genset.

Tough choice for someone who leans their boat towards solar and less genny.... but...I still gravitate to an installed diesel genset for some reason...
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2018, 08:25 AM   #35
Guru
 
foggysail's Avatar
 
City: Ashland, MA
Vessel Model: 1990 Silverton 40 aftcabin
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 1,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Honda?....I dont know, unless an all electric boat and you need a couple ACs running.... maybe yes?

Those Hondas have some strong points...

My Honda has had zero maintenance in 18 years of intermediate use and saved my bacon on trips when my big genny went down. Plus it uses a fraction of the fuel. Only oil changes with frighteningly long intervals and doesnt even have a replaceable filter.

Granted it doesnt run big stuff as it is only 1000W, but a 2500W may be in the cards this summer.

It is even wayyyy quieter than my 8KW in a sound shield when the Honda is on the back deck and you arent in the aft cabin bed.

Plus if it stops working you have more options than an installed genset.

Tough choice for someone who leans their boat towards solar and less genny.... but...I still gravitate to an installed diesel genset for some reason...
I share your Honda experience!!! It (1KW) is a great generator, quite and very reliable. Mine is close to 30 years old and I have done nothing it other than oil changes but it does get little use now. When I had my Hunter sailboat it sat next to the mast, covered of course and it was my main means to battery charging.
foggysail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2018, 08:35 AM   #36
Valued Technical Contributor
 
DavidM's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 6,473
Quote:
Originally Posted by foggysail View Post
I share your Honda experience!!! It (1KW) is a great generator, quite and very reliable. Mine is close to 30 years old and I have done nothing it other than oil changes but it does get little use now. When I had my Hunter sailboat it sat next to the mast, covered of course and it was my main means to battery charging.
How did you use it for battery charging? If you powered the boat's AC electrical system so you could charge from your shore power charger then you had to have a relatively small charger, probably less than 40A to stay within the Honda's continuous rating of 7.5 A. If you are using the DC output, it is only 8 amps.

David
DavidM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2018, 09:46 AM   #37
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Sold
Vessel Model: Was an Albin/PSN 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 26,363
my Promariner 75A charger allows me to select 25/50/75/100 percent output...

so I just drop it down when using my Honda 1000W, back up with my Westerbeke.

with my Isotherm water heater only drawing 750W, I can even heat water.... but would like to do both at the same time, thusvlooking at 2000W as a replacement emergency genset.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2018, 10:09 AM   #38
Guru
 
foggysail's Avatar
 
City: Ashland, MA
Vessel Model: 1990 Silverton 40 aftcabin
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 1,208
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
How did you use it for battery charging? If you powered the boat's AC electrical system so you could charge from your shore power charger then you had to have a relatively small charger, probably less than 40A to stay within the Honda's continuous rating of 7.5 A. If you are using the DC output, it is only 8 amps.

David
Dave-- I purchased my Hunter back in 1979! The chargers available back then were the old ferroresonant chargers and mine was only capable of 30 amperes. Because these older style chargers had constant voltage outputs rather than current, the charging current quickly diminished as the battery regains charge.

I used to connect the charger via an extension cord while on anchor/moorings. I remember many times I filled the genny in the morning and left the boat for the day with it running on deck lashed to the mast. Not something I would do today although the Honda is very quite. Day usage was something I could get away with but night usage I am sure would have resulted in complaints.

A ferro charger would not come near satisfying today's battery charging requirements!
foggysail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2018, 10:27 AM   #39
Senior Member
 
Westiculo's Avatar
 
City: Boston
Vessel Name: Rose Mary
Vessel Model: 42 Grand Banks Motoryacht - 1985
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 271
I know it's not that helpful if your mind is made up, but it sucks to fire up the generator at a nice quiet anchorage - plus they're expensive!

You could install a real house battery bank
8X fullriver DC224-6 AGM batteries for 900Ah - $1800
Put in an inverter
Magnum MS2812 with monitor and remote - $1800
Install a diesel heater for hot water or on-demand propane
Webasto TSL17 with instant hot water heat exchanger - $1000
Upgrade your alternator to charge the battery bank
Balmar 200-amp (depends on number and type of engines) - $1500

Total price for an amazing setup: $6-8k. You could probably survive with much less, and you'll never have to think about having to start the generator; just cruise, make coffee whenever you want, and always have hot water.
Westiculo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2018, 10:31 AM   #40
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 10,952
Quote:
....a propane-enabled version of the portable Honda, Yamaha, Hyundai, etc....
We have an Onan/Cummins 2500 watt propane generator under our camper van. It burns about .4 gallons per hour at 1/2 load. A 20 lb propane cylinder, full, holds about 4.7 gallons I think. Iím not sure how practice it would be for a boat. Just saying.
Larry M is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012