Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-07-2020, 10:00 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
Newtrawlerowner's Avatar
 
City: Delray Beach, FL and Denver, CO
Vessel Name: PartnerShip II
Vessel Model: 2003 Mainship 400
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 258
Change electric stove, install gas stove

2003 MS 400 has an electric stove and grille in summer kitchen. Thinking of changing to gas. I know some 400s came with gas. Anybody done this conversion? I know I'll have to run a gas line. I'll find a certified marine mechanic to either advise or do that part.
Newtrawlerowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2020, 10:02 AM   #2
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Ft Pierce
Vessel Name: Sold
Vessel Model: Was an Albin/PSN 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 25,609
Not a Mainship, but I converted to a propane range top. Couldnt be happier.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2020, 10:38 AM   #3
Valued Technical Contributor
 
DavidM's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 6,323
It should be quite doable, but a few considerations:

Propane locker- I think that the 400s which had propane had a locker in back of the flybridge seating area. It needs to drain overboard.

Solenoid- Install an electric solenoid valve (available in a package with regulator) and gauge at the propane tank. The solenoid valve is controlled by a switch near the stove.

Propane sniffer alarm- I have mixed feelings about these as the sensor produces false alarms after a year or so. Replacing the sensor periodically is the only solution. But it is the safer way to do it. There are even sniffers who are tied into the solenoid so it automatically shuts off whan propane is detected.

Gas routing- This will be a big of a PITA. Also make the hose continuous from the propane solenoid to the stove, ie no couplings.

David
DavidM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2020, 10:43 AM   #4
Guru
 
Woodland Hills's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Vessel Name: Alzero
Vessel Model: Hatteras 63' CPMY
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 1,548
Why not switch to electric induction? Cooks like gas, but the fuel is much easier to deal with.
Woodland Hills is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2020, 10:38 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Newtrawlerowner's Avatar
 
City: Delray Beach, FL and Denver, CO
Vessel Name: PartnerShip II
Vessel Model: 2003 Mainship 400
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidM View Post
It should be quite doable, but a few considerations:

Propane locker- I think that the 400s which had propane had a locker in back of the flybridge seating area. It needs to drain overboard.

Solenoid- Install an electric solenoid valve (available in a package with regulator) and gauge at the propane tank. The solenoid valve is controlled by a switch near the stove.

Propane sniffer alarm- I have mixed feelings about these as the sensor produces false alarms after a year or so. Replacing the sensor periodically is the only solution. But it is the safer way to do it. There are even sniffers who are tied into the solenoid so it automatically shuts off whan propane is detected.

Gas routing- This will be a big of a PITA. Also make the hose continuous from the propane solenoid to the stove, ie no couplings.

David

Great information. The 400 has a summer kitchen at the rear of the flybridge. I will add solenoid in locker and propane sensor in main salon. And if they are like a CO sensor they probably have a 5-7 year life. I'm removing headliner due to damage and replacing radar so running propane line will be easier.
Newtrawlerowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2020, 06:54 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Pmcsurf1's Avatar
 
City: St Augustine
Vessel Name: Agape
Vessel Model: Mainship 400 Trawler
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 246
Go gas
Pmcsurf1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2020, 07:36 AM   #7
Member
 
City: Hill city
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 18
I am considering also installing a gas range oven combination. Have wonder what brand is a good one. I am at a Marina with no power, so we are off the grid all the time. What brand are you looking at?
Curiosity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2020, 12:59 PM   #8
Guru
 
City: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island
Vessel Name: Capricorn
Vessel Model: Mariner 30 - Sedan Cruiser 1969
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,019
Electric is good if you only do marina boating, or boating on the hook with a generator. If you enjoy the sounds of silence on the hook, gas is best. PNW boaters including coastal BC boaters who enjoy being on the hook a lot, tend to rely on gas. Anchoring and stern tying in Desolation Sound can often be tight so using a generator in God's country when silence is golden is the devil's work.
rsn48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2020, 01:02 PM   #9
Guru
 
City: Rochester, NY
Vessel Name: Hour Glass
Vessel Model: Chris Craft Catalina 381
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 5,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsn48 View Post
Electric is good if you only do marina boating, or boating on the hook with a generator. If you enjoy the sounds of silence on the hook, gas is best. PNW boaters including coastal BC boaters who enjoy being on the hook a lot, tend to rely on gas. Anchoring and stern tying in Desolation Sound can often be tight so using a generator in God's country when silence is golden is the devil's work.

Electric induction is also viable if you have a big enough boat to run it on solar and battery power. Smaller boats don't have that option as there's just not enough room for solar panels and batteries.

Personally, I don't find my electric stove inconvenient even when away from shore power. I'm going to need the generator at some point to make hot water for showers, so I just run it for 45 minutes to an hour to make dinner and let the water heater warm up. Once I've got the solar / inverter project done I can scrap the 30-ish minute morning generator run for coffee.
rslifkin is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2020, 01:09 PM   #10
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 9,617
Generator to make HW? Why not install a loop to the hot water tank and let the main engine make the hot water?

Converting to gas, get it done professional. Much safer.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2020, 01:14 PM   #11
Guru
 
City: Rochester, NY
Vessel Name: Hour Glass
Vessel Model: Chris Craft Catalina 381
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 5,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
Generator to make HW? Why not install a loop to the hot water tank and let the main engine make the hot water?

In my case, I've thought about it, but with how everything is placed, it would be tough to do without making the lines hard to bleed or having them in the way of crawling around the engine room. And I'd need a new water heater, the current one doesn't have a heat exchanger. Plus, that only helps if we've moved the boat that day. If we stay 2 nights in the same place without power, I'll still need the generator for hot water.
rslifkin is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2020, 01:28 PM   #12
Guru
 
City: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island
Vessel Name: Capricorn
Vessel Model: Mariner 30 - Sedan Cruiser 1969
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,019
Electric induction is also viable if you have a big enough boat to run it on solar and battery power. Smaller boats don't have that option as there's just not enough room for solar panels and batteries.

Personally, I don't find my electric stove inconvenient even when away from shore power. I'm going to need the generator at some point to make hot water for showers, so I just run it for 45 minutes to an hour to make dinner and let the water heater warm up. Once I've got the solar / inverter project done I can scrap the 30-ish minute morning generator run for coffee.


My Espar is hooked up to heat water, I just leave the fans off so the boat doesn't heat up in the summer.

I have Efoy, solar and of course boat generator. And I do use electric appliances while on the hook. But I only run these appliances for a short time. For example, the toaster will only get about 5 to 10 minutes a day of use, but I bought a cheap one, not because I am cheap, but because cheap ones have less wattage. My current toaster runs about 800 watts. Same with my microwave, its .7 cubic feet and runs on 940 watts (more when you factor in the power to make power) but again I use it for only 4 minutes a day.

I have two strategies, one on the hook and one at the marina. On the hook, gas cooking including BBQ and hot water for coffee, as well as the appliances mentioned above.

At the marina I use my convection oven and induction plate to use shore power and conserve propane. I can roast a chicken on the BBQ on the hook and roast it in the convection oven at the marina.
rsn48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2020, 01:34 PM   #13
Guru
 
City: Rochester, NY
Vessel Name: Hour Glass
Vessel Model: Chris Craft Catalina 381
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 5,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsn48 View Post
My Espar is hooked up to heat water, I just leave the fans off so the boat doesn't heat up in the summer.

I'm assuming it's a diesel Espar with separate tank?
rslifkin is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2020, 01:38 PM   #14
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 9,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsn48 View Post
[I]


I have two strategies, one on the hook and one at the marina. On the hook, gas cooking including BBQ and hot water for coffee, as well as the appliances mentioned above.

At the marina I use my convection oven and induction plate to use shore power and conserve propane. I can roast a chicken on the BBQ on the hook and roast it in the convection oven at the marina.
What is the brand name of the induction stove top, 120vt?, how many KW per "burner", how maybe KW for the convection oven?
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2020, 11:10 PM   #15
Guru
 
City: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island
Vessel Name: Capricorn
Vessel Model: Mariner 30 - Sedan Cruiser 1969
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 2,019
I'm assuming it's a diesel Espar with separate tank?

Yes, seperate tank, only 3 gallons; one of the things I did wrong. Knowing what I know now, I should have had something like a ten gallon tank for diesel storage. I often spend days on the boat at the marina on 15 amp service so I can't run a high watt electrical heater. I find I go through a little over a gallon and a half a day of fuel.

With running charger, heating fans for Espar, refrigerator, I can't have a high wattage heater going or I pop the breaker on the pier. So far I'm up to 7 resets on the pier breaker for my boat.

I also have a Dickenson propane heater, 9000 series one, and I will sometimes turn it on as well, especially if I've been away from the boat for a time and it is cold. So I run everything I can to heat the boat up quickly. I also have a 750 watt kicker heater built into the galley, so initially I might have all three heaters going - Espar, propane, ac heater.

This is the induction single cooking plate I use, I can only use it when I am at a 30 amp service receptible. Although occasional if I am at a 15 amp marina plug in, the Victron will take excess electrical needs from the batteries.

https://www.homehardware.ca/en/1800-...oker/p/3834374

The one big negative against the induction cooker linked above is the the LED lights are very difficult to see in bright sunlight. I've been known to put a towel over my head to read the numbers.
rsn48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2020, 02:16 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
BigTime's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Vessel Name: Shady Grove
Vessel Model: TMC Custom 41 Trawler & S-2 10.3 Sail
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 115
I just finished "reconverting" my boat to propane. In the 2 years I have owned the boat I could not make myself like running my genset to cook on the hook, although I really liked that Princess electric stove at the dock , plus it was a really nice install with a countertop cover that I consider necessary for my small galley to function when not using the cooktop. The boat had signs of it's original Taiwanese propane install which was just a bare tank shoved inside the brow with access from the upper steering station and a copper line to the galley with no sign of a solenoid valve.
I completed my propane install with a Trident propane locker that holds 2 twenty pound tanks, properly vented , solenoid inside locker and a Trident thermoplastic line to the galley a month ago and just spent the weekend on the hook for the first time . I also had installed a Victron 3000w inverter since my previous trip out.

IT WAS SO NICE ANCHORING, COOKING DINNER WHILE WATCHING THE TELEVISION NEWS AND MAKING MY MORNING COFFEE BEFORE A HOT SHOWER WITHOUT EVER STARTING THE GENERATOR.
BigTime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2020, 08:10 PM   #17
Member
 
City: Hill city
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 18
Electric to propane

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigTime View Post
I just finished "reconverting" my boat to propane. In the 2 years I have owned the boat I could not make myself like running my genset to cook on the hook, although I really liked that Princess electric stove at the dock , plus it was a really nice install with a countertop cover that I consider necessary for my small galley to function when not using the cooktop. The boat had signs of it's original Taiwanese propane install which was just a bare tank shoved inside the brow with access from the upper steering station and a copper line to the galley with no sign of a solenoid valve.
I completed my propane install with a Trident propane locker that holds 2 twenty pound tanks, properly vented , solenoid inside locker and a Trident thermoplastic line to the galley a month ago and just spent the weekend on the hook for the first time . I also had installed a Victron 3000w inverter since my previous trip out.

IT WAS SO NICE ANCHORING, COOKING DINNER WHILE WATCHING THE TELEVISION NEWS AND MAKING MY MORNING COFFEE BEFORE A HOT SHOWER WITHOUT EVER STARTING THE GENERATOR.
Sounds like just what I need to do.
Tell me what you used for a stove and how much solar you have to make this
Happen??
Curiosity is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2020, 08:55 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
BigTime's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Vessel Name: Shady Grove
Vessel Model: TMC Custom 41 Trawler & S-2 10.3 Sail
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curiosity View Post
Sounds like just what I need to do.
Tell me what you used for a stove and how much solar you have to make this
Happen??
Sorry but no solar , fossil fuel only. House bank 6 GC2 agm, 660ah. We rarely anchor longer than 2 days without moving. Balmar 120amp alternator on main engine seems to restore bank with a light days run. Hot water from heat exchanger will last 24hrs minimum. 2nd day at anchor generator run for hot water & 120amp charger from Victron.
As far as stove my first choice was Dickinson but would not fit my opening very well plus cost $250 for shipping. Second choice was Force 10 which I could buy from West Marine at high retail with no shipping expense, their NA Standard would fit my existing opening well but I was not sure how I could cover it for counter usage. Then I came across a RV stove branded " Greystone" that FIT my opening perfectly , had a really nice hinged tempered glass top and cost $499 delivered. How could I go wrong to try one ? So far I really like it.
BigTime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2020, 12:38 PM   #19
Guru
 
Marco Flamingo's Avatar
 
City: Dewatto
Vessel Name: CHiTON
Vessel Model: Tung Hwa Clipper 30
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 780
Quote:
Originally Posted by rslifkin View Post
Electric induction is also viable if you have a big enough boat to run it on solar and battery power. Smaller boats don't have that option as there's just not enough room for solar panels and batteries.
I use electric induction when cruising in my C-Dory 16. That's a pretty small boat. I do have a solar panel, but I used induction before that was installed. My house battery is a single Group 21 and it was enough to cook for 2 people for 10 days (my longest double cruise on the 16). We did cruise everyday, so I don't know if solar would have kept up if we had anchored for a few days.

I think that one of the misconceptions about induction is that it uses the same amount of electricity as resistance burners. Induction is freaky fast because it heats the pot directly. Not a flame licking at the pot or a restrictive coil that touches the pot in a few places. The low heat settings can turn on for a second, off for 4 seconds, etc., and not a single calorie, amp, watt, whatever the metric, wasted. Easy to clean cook top with nothing burning even if it spills over.

I just bought an inductive burner to replace the propane on my trawler. It will require me to replace the entire counter top and get a pure sine wave inverter for a proper install. Still, I can't wait to get rid of the propane issues. Way back when, I thought that propane was a slight improvement over my old alcohol stove, but that's a low bar.
__________________
Marco Flamingo
Marco Flamingo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2020, 01:27 PM   #20
Guru
 
City: Here
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,936
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtrawlerowner View Post
2003 MS 400 has an electric stove and grille in summer kitchen. Thinking of changing to gas. I know some 400s came with gas. Anybody done this conversion? I know I'll have to run a gas line. I'll find a certified marine mechanic to either advise or do that part.
I've done it three times. You might get some tips here....
Safe Boat Propane Installations

If you email me ... boatpoker@gmail.com I'll respond with pdf's of the propane standards
boatpoker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012