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Old 12-21-2020, 01:58 PM   #21
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Our boat was converted from propane to a Princess inductive cooktop. Cooking on it isn't great but when we 'went up the delta' where the boat lived for a few decades it was easier to understand why it was converted. No where near as much heat inside from the inductive cooktop.

But we do most of our boating in the cooler climes of the bay. It's on the list to put a propane stove and oven back in...after making pull out drawers under the bed to make easier use of all that storage.

And you can do the work at least as safe if not safer than most professionals. I've worked in boat yards and worked on boats that had a lot of work done in boat yards. Owners often do dumb things on their own but if you do your research you will be happy with what you do
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Old 12-21-2020, 02:00 PM   #22
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Most insurance policies specify it has to be done professionally.
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Old 12-21-2020, 02:20 PM   #23
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Most insurance policies specify it has to be done professionally.
I've done thousands of surveys over the last 30 years and never heard that before.
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Old 12-21-2020, 02:58 PM   #24
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Electric breaker

We also had to flip a propane breaker on the panel of our Mainship 400 FWIW.
THE PROPANE BOX WAS PRICEY. One issue we also had waas that any wind at all made grilling take forever. I ended up buying disposable aluminum turkey pans and put it over the meat like a cover with a weight on it. Funny thing is I was gonna convert to an electric option but sold the boat.
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Old 12-21-2020, 03:39 PM   #25
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Gas Stove

Be sure to use a Marine stove with thermocouplings on the burners.

With the thermocouplings on the burners, if a flame blows out, the gas flow is stopped and you don't get a propane buildup down below.

RV stoves are cheaper, but don't have that feature.
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Old 12-21-2020, 03:42 PM   #26
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Electric induction is also viable if you have a big enough boat to run it on solar and battery power. Smaller boats don't have that option as there's just not enough room for solar panels and batteries.


.
There are several discussions RE this on cruisers forum
Plenty there with less solar than us claim they can do it, but I suspect they are giving their expensive lithium banks a severe touch up doing it as there is no solar at night.

We have a larger solar array (2.5Kw ) than most and with 880ah @ 24v a sizable battery bank, certainly more than most sailing vessels and there is no way that we will be going induction any time soon, certainly not while the gas is working for us.
Gas is cheap, proven and if done properly, safe.
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Old 12-21-2020, 03:44 PM   #27
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Be sure to use a Marine stove with thermocouplings on the burners.

With the thermocouplings on the burners, if a flame blows out, the gas flow is stopped and you don't get a propane buildup down below.

RV stoves are cheaper, but don't have that feature.
Over here they do
Pretty sure home gas stoves do as well - you can buy replacement home stove thermocouples.
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Old 12-21-2020, 05:06 PM   #28
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I have several friends who have gone the other way and ripped out propane systems in favor of induction. They both installed these Kenyon stoves

https://www.cookwithkenyon.com/produ...ops/induction/

The induction use much less power than an old style electric stove. The smaller stoves top out at 1800 watts and most of the time you aren't cooking at full power. There's no startup surge like a microwave so a 2000 watt inverter could handle it. If you plan to cook for hours you'll need the genset on but many boats have battery banks that can easily handle a normal dinner prep.

The other advantage is that one burner on full power is much hotter than propane. A full pot of pasta water will boil in 1/3rd the time of propane.
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Old 12-21-2020, 05:29 PM   #29
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^^^ But its $1200 for 2 burners
And no oven
Where's the logic behind ripping out perfectly good gas and replacing it with a lesser product at a higher price?
What do they bake bread in, pizzas, roast etc?
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Old 12-21-2020, 05:44 PM   #30
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Hmmm, 2 small observations, neither of which is a deal killer.
No pot rails, gotta design them or buy some that will work from a 3rd party
No protection for the glass top when not in use.
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Old 12-21-2020, 05:45 PM   #31
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Lots of good info in these posts... Here is all I can add:

We purchased a 2000 Mainship 390 in July. After looking at several boats of this make/model for over a year, it was the only one we looked at with Propane. For a number of reasons we made our move and we are thrilled with it including the propane stove ... as the generator is loud. Our surveyor really liked the idea of it too.

Tank is 20# fiberglass on upper sun deck, has electric solenoid shut off under cover just inside canvased fly bridge. Obviously, the tank's valve needs to be open, 12 VDC power to the solenoid circuit needs to be on at the panel, and the solenoid switch at the galley needs to be "on". Each of the 3 burners and the oven has a thermocouple that needs to be "hot" or else fuel flow stops. The brand is Princess, which I don't think is available any longer, but there are others. Everything including the stove was in great condition.

The admiral really likes me NOT having to start the generator for my early up coffee every morning! All meals on the hook are great. Oven temp is amazingly accurate for a 20 year old stove. (Frozen Pizza is a fav.)

In our previous boat, we pulled out the alcohol stove and put in a counter top that housed a portable single burner S/S butane stove. If we had landed a boat with electric range, a single burner S/S butane stove would probably what we would use 99% of the time (when not on shore power.)

When putting in a propane appliance, I agree a certified professional install is peace of mind. I'm sure the USCG has regs as well as the boating safety orgs.

Our water heater does get hot off the main engine (180F), or shore power. (The high temp makes up for the small capacity.)

Note... several of our local propane refill stations were wigged out by the fiberglass propane tank. The local West Marine store who stocks them, pointed us to a couple of propane vendors who were perfectly OK with refilling it for us. (When we push off for the loop, we'll likely need ANY nearby propane vendor to fill without question. So a steel or aluminum tank may be in our future before we push off.)

The teak wood to the immediate left of the stove seems to not like the heat. We have refinished that wood... but we are watching to see how long it lasts. There are a lot of decorative S/S backsplash type finishes that might work out better. We'll see.
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Old 12-21-2020, 06:05 PM   #32
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How well do those "as seen on TV" infomercials work on a boat?
LOL You folks with a 50 amp boat and a generator to support it, are lucky.
Folks with a 30amp boat learn all about timing and load shedding.
I put an amp meter in the galley area to give me guidance.
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Old 12-21-2020, 06:06 PM   #33
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Related:
Santa is delivering a "T-fal Clipso" stove top pressure cooker to the admiral, as requested on her wish list... as seen on SV-Basik's YouTube channel.
(Pressure cookers save on fuel and cooking time.)

All our investments are to avoid 120VAC appliance and "stuff" as much as possible.
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Old 12-21-2020, 07:00 PM   #34
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^^^ But its $1200 for 2 burners
And no oven
Where's the logic behind ripping out perfectly good gas and replacing it with a lesser product at a higher price?
What do they bake bread in, pizzas, roast etc?
I shopped around and found one of these two burners on sale for $124. It works great and can be flush mounted. I could build some kind of railing to keep pots on the stove, but I have found that this actually works better. It is a very thin silicon mat. It grips the glass surface and the pot and hold things tight in any sea conditions that you would contemplate cooking in. It even holds for the inconsiderate jerk that makes a big wake in the anchorage. It can be left on to protect the glass top (from what?) or rolled up and stored. It is thin enough to not effect the heat and can handle heat up to frying.

Getting rid of the traditional oven is another one of the benefits. When I had a diesel stove for heat and cooking, I baked bread every day because I just had to turn up the stove to get it hot enough. But most people don't use the oven that much.

For baking on an induction stove top, it just takes a little ingenuity. A $50 Coleman folding oven can sit on the silicon mat. I've put a piece of hardware cloth between the oven and the silicon mat and that seems to heat things quicker and more evenly. Check the YouTube videos for how well these work on Coleman propane stoves. Fortunately, they also work with induction.

I can roll up the mat and fold up the oven and save all that wasted space (which can now be used for food, pots and pans, etc.) No need to wonder how much propane is in the tank. No condensation from using propane. Total cost of $200 for the oven/stove. That's about what a fiberglass propane tank costs (one that you get to lug up and down the dock if you find somewhere to fill it when you run out). I don't know what an actual propane stove/oven costs. Hopefully a lot so I can sell mine to cover the conversion.

Induction seems to be the better product. Lesser price. I still get to bake bread, pizza, roasts. But I don't get the explosions for which propane is famous.

Capt Ray -- You will love the induction pressure cooker (assuming it is induction). I have one and use it for lots of things. One of my favorites is boiling a crab (our pressure cooker is probably 6 quart so one large crab). When the pressure is built up enough to start leaking steam, the temperature is about 230 degrees. Turn off the heat (which is instant). Let the cooker cool down and lose pressure (10 to 15 minutes). The crab is cooked perfect without a single bit of steam condensing on the windows. Same works for white rice.
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Old 12-21-2020, 07:44 PM   #35
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My house has been under construction for 9 months including kitchen. Have been living in out in-law suite in back along with an outdoor kitchen (Florida). Bought an induction hot plate and love it. Very efficient with no excess heat. I thought about replacing propane range on my boat but really want an oven. My sense is a modest LiFePo4 battery bank and solar would easily suffice

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Old 12-21-2020, 07:57 PM   #36
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Do a Google image search for "Yacht propane explosion" Look at the pictures.....slowly. I have had propane on boats. Odds of mishap with a proper installation are small. But not zero, and the "effects" are pretty impressive. Nope.

Two burner induction cooktop for me..... I actually think it cooks better than gas. (I am the chef in the family.)
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Old 12-21-2020, 08:02 PM   #37
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I put an amp meter in the galley area to give me guidance.
Even with 50A (times 2 of course) I have to watch it. 4 AC/Heat pumps, induction cooker, micro/convection, electric water heater. I laminated a picture of my AC distribution panel and have it in the galley and at the helm, so I can decide what to run on which leg. I can confirm with the ammeters but knowing what is hooked up where is usually enough.
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Old 12-21-2020, 08:11 PM   #38
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Peter's idea of an induction hot plate is a low risk way to try it out. We have one with our propane stove because the propane couldn't keep a big pot of water boiling hard enough to keep pasta from sticking together. The little hot plate heats like a gas home stove.

But I hadn't expected to find that they also have far more smarts built in than a regular stove. You can set it to a particular temperature to keep a soup just at simmer. And unlike a regular electric stove the heat changes instantly when you adjust it.

They are so efficient with electricity, that I expect many will find that the hot plate runs fine off their batteries. Many meals don't require more than one burner.

We don't have any trouble with pots sliding at anchor. Underway we use a silicone mat that takes care of moderate waves like a wake.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Old 12-21-2020, 08:13 PM   #39
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You all may be interested in this : https://www.cheboygannews.com/news/2...wo-to-hospital

I am told he died
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Old 12-21-2020, 08:32 PM   #40
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Yachting Monthly replaced an electric stove with propane. Soup's on!
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