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-   -   question: tipping the dock master (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s3/question-tipping-dock-master-39195.html)

seattleboatguy 06-24-2018 07:37 AM

question: tipping the dock master
 
When you are out on a cruise and pull into a marina for the night and the dock master meets you at your assigned slip and helps you tie up, are you supposed to tip the dock master, or do you consider that service part of the overnight marina fee? I confess that, up to now, I have always considered it as part of the overnight fee.

menzies 06-24-2018 07:49 AM

Transient slip and fuel dock help, we tip. When we go on a cruise, for example to the Bahamas, we take our cash in 20s, with a hundred in fives for tips.

Donna 06-24-2018 07:53 AM

Yup, always tip!

Tom.B 06-24-2018 08:07 AM

Oh no, here we go again. ;-) Not trying to retain good information from you or dismiss your question, but I'd recommend you do a quick forum search as there are several LONG threads from the past about tipping. There are very passionate feelings around here regarding tipping for services like you mentioned. I won't state my position on it as it is well-documented (like everyone else's), but needless to say, tipping threads tend to get kinda heated and I'd hate to go back and recover that ground.



Tipping is a personal decision and you should do what you feel is comfortable.

rclarke246 06-24-2018 08:20 AM

I always tip service folks. I have great respect for the working people that are the life-blood of capitalism.

Usually a $20. May be a bit much but I figure it helps make up for those who don't tip at all.

Steve91T 06-24-2018 08:24 AM

Last year I asked this question and it turned in to pages of the value of peoples lives or something.

psneeld 06-24-2018 08:41 AM

I tip non management types always....

Not so much dockmasters unless it was truly a greater effort than walking down and catching a line or two.

Then again, I try to dock so there is no effort on anyones part and I do my own electric and water.

90 percent of the time I have to redo docklines after even dockmasters.

Yep tipping is personal and often based upon personal experience on both sides of tipping and or in the industry in question.

Donna 06-24-2018 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve91T (Post 675481)
Last year I asked this question and it turned in to pages of the value of peoples lives or something.


Pages? Huh. I just do what I feel I need to do. Honestly? Donít care what others do.

Pgitug 06-24-2018 08:50 AM

We give a $5 tip when the dock help comes out with a good attitude and is pleasant. Which is 99% of the time.

kchace 06-24-2018 09:37 AM

Same here. Usually tip $5.

hollywood8118 06-24-2018 09:54 AM

Must be a east coast thing?
I have never seen it done on the West Coast

Although it is rare that a marina has dock help to tie you up on arrival here.

On my recent trip to Mexico the dock help ran a long way to help tie up the boat on arrival.. at least a couple hundred yards.. I did tip them as they really showed effort

HOLLYWOOD

Floating 06-24-2018 10:20 AM

A couple of years ago I was chatting with the captain (not the owner) of a super yacht about berthing fees. He told me when they arrived in Italy the probable berthing fee for one night would be $3000 and he would be expected to tip the marinaros the same in cash for finding him the berth. Wish I had been a marinaros in Italy !!!

stanfromhell 06-24-2018 10:20 AM

Whats the difference between a Canadian and a canoe?
Canoes tip.:)
Tipping is an American custom that fortunately the rest of the world does not embrace.

Woodland Hills 06-24-2018 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stanfromhell (Post 675518)
Whats the difference between a Canadian and a canoe?
Canoes tip.:)
Tipping is an American custom that fortunately the rest of the world does not embrace.

The American custom is to not pay employees a living wage forcing customers to make up the difference.

Shrew 06-24-2018 10:36 AM

I tip anyone who helps me with anything. The title might be 'Dockmaster', but if he/she is down on the dock tossing/grabbing lines, their role is now "Dockhand". Some places are so small it is one person who wears many hats. It is their right to refuse tip.

You have the right to NOT tip as well. You can tell the difference. Two boats come into a gas dock at the same time. Everyone runs to one boat until someone is told to go help the other boat. Guess who tips and who doesn't.

I tip the pumpout boat heavily. I rarely wait. I've watched them pass other boats hailing them to take care of us first. I talk to other people who don't have the same experience. I wonder why.

KenM 06-24-2018 10:46 AM

For Service Above and Beyond
 
If someone really goes out of their way to help, when I could use it, I will tip them gladly, but for routine stuff, like grabbing dock lines at the fuel dock, that is routine and part of their job, why is tipping necessary?

psneeld 06-24-2018 10:54 AM

It depends....

Some places employ seasonal dock help and they work for barely minimum wage.

Other places are family owned and pay well, as municipal marinas that pay a given level pay commensurate with experience and job demands.

Hard to always guess what might be fair or a decent thing (here in the US)....all you can do is take the time to guess...or strike up a conversation and learn a bit about whose who.

Having a hard and fast rule or amount to meflies in the face of the concept of tipping, unless a known industry based on tipping.... which the marine industry really isnt.

jleonard 06-24-2018 10:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KenM (Post 675530)
If someone really goes out of their way to help, when I could use it, I will tip them gladly, but for routine stuff, like grabbing dock lines at the fuel dock, that is routine and part of their job, why is tipping necessary?

I agree.

AusCan 06-24-2018 11:03 AM

There is no right or wrong amount to tip. It is a personal choice.

Bigsfish 06-24-2018 11:08 AM

I agree with Ken too. If I get really good service I hand over a $20.00 tip if not just a thanks. Last year at Ft. Pierce for the get together, we had two deckhands help us, really didnít need it because Larry was there but we gave each dude a $20.00. We got beautiful greetings from then on. :)

smitty477 06-24-2018 11:09 AM

Always tip the dockhands - some places more than others. In a small town or dock the Dockmaster is the same as a dockhand so same with them.

markpierce 06-24-2018 12:11 PM

The city-owned marina here is operated by government employees. I don't tip them but pay berthing fees and property taxes.

foggysail 06-24-2018 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donna (Post 675484)
Pages? Huh. I just do what I feel I need to do. Honestly? Donít care what others do.

I agree!!! I donít and I donít care what others do:thumb:

markpierce 06-24-2018 12:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smitty477 (Post 675542)
Always tip the dockhands - some places more than others. In a small town or dock the Dockmaster is the same as a dockhand so same with them.

The only dockhands in this area work at fuel docks. I don't tip people fueling my automobile or my boat.

smitty477 06-24-2018 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by markpierce (Post 675565)
The only dockhands in this area work at fuel docks. I don't tip people fueling my automobile or my boat.

The dock hands in our small town dock as well as many of the towns around us are typically seasonal college kids trying to make money during the summer. These town docks have no long term customers at all just transient boaters - Northport, Norwalk .Milford, etc. Similar with many marinas that are mainly serving transients and staffed by college kids - Mystic, Greenwich, BI, Pt Jeff, Greenport, etc etc.

Irish Rambler 06-24-2018 02:06 PM

If you ever go to Italy and berth in a marina do not let the marinaro's touch your lines at all no matter how much they insist because the moment they do they demand a tip for 'assistance'.
Politely say no thank you, as long as they insist keep offering a polite no thank you.Eventually they will give up.

menzies 06-24-2018 07:02 PM

I put $2300 worth of diesel in today. The fuel dock attendant caught the lines, and tied us up and then chatted with my wife for the hour or so it took to fuel up, moved the fuel line between the three tank fills, then helped us off. Really, given what I slapped my credit card down for, a tip is reasonable.

Simi 60 06-24-2018 07:31 PM

I tip people for great service in low income 3rd world countries.
First world countries pay sufficient wages so tipping is not necessary.

menzies 06-24-2018 07:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Simi 60 (Post 675704)
I tip people for great service in low income 3rd world countries.
First world countries pay sufficient wages so tipping is not necessary.

So no tips from you in Australia for taxi drivers, restaurant wait staff, or hotel porters and chambermaids.

Interesting.

Simi 60 06-24-2018 08:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by menzies (Post 675706)
So no tips from you in Australia for taxi drivers, restaurant wait staff, or hotel porters and chambermaids.

Interesting.

Hotel staff no, but then I can't justify staying in Australian hotels, its cheaper for us to fly to south east Asia and rent a pool villa and even then in the vast majority of cases, tips have been refused. I have been chased out of restaurants, hotels and bars when leaving small money behind and that small money has been returned.

Different story now in tourist areas, Americans giving tips has now made it almost expected to tip, I suspect staff may have had wages cut in these areas.

Taxis? Don't catch them in australia,always use uber and no actual transaction takes place.


Restaurants? I can cook a far better meal onboard in most instances but if I do eat out and pay by card there is no facility here for tipping.
If paying cash I'll round up, but more as I don't want a pocket full of coin.


Most of my life in trade and service industry, never received or expected a tip.
Like I said, first world countries pay a proper wage.

dhays 06-24-2018 08:27 PM

I have very rarely been someplace where there are dockhands to assist. As such, the concept of tipping them just never occurred to me. It has only been in the last few years hanging out here on TF that Iíve learned that tipping is a ďthingĒ at a marina. As such, we try to keep $5 bills on the boat to use as tips on the rare occasion.

AusCan 06-24-2018 09:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by menzies (Post 675706)
So no tips from you in Australia for taxi drivers, restaurant wait staff, or hotel porters and chambermaids.

Interesting.

I'm not sure about taxi drivers but restaurant staff, hotel porters and chambermaids are paid $18-$24/hour in Australia. Tips are not necessary.

menzies 06-24-2018 09:31 PM

Clearly there weren't just a lot of Irish sent to Botony Bay, but a bunch of Scots as well.

Simi 60 06-24-2018 09:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by menzies (Post 675737)
Clearly there weren't just a lot of Irish sent to Botony Bay, but a bunch of Scots as well.

The Scots are in america.
Look to your pay rates for evidence of this.

Gordon J 06-24-2018 09:53 PM

Americans donít get it
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by menzies (Post 675706)
So no tips from you in Australia for taxi drivers, restaurant wait staff, or hotel porters and chambermaids.

Interesting.

Much, if not most of the world does NOT tip. In most places, people are paid a salary for their services and do not depend on hand outs from strangers.

markpierce 06-24-2018 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by menzies (Post 675694)
I put $2300 worth of diesel in today. The fuel dock attendant caught the lines, and tied us up and then chatted with my wife for the hour or so it took to fuel up, moved the fuel line between the three tank fills, then helped us off. Really, given what I slapped my credit card down for, a tip is reasonable.

At most, the attendant, typically a middle-aged man, hands me the fuel nozzle which I deploy while handling the hose, to the several tank inlets. And then, he processes the credit-card charge. No thought of a tip. And in Emeryville, fueling is self-service (not typical here).

South of Heaven 06-24-2018 10:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by menzies (Post 675694)
I put $2300 worth of diesel in today. The fuel dock attendant caught the lines, and tied us up and then chatted with my wife for the hour or so it took to fuel up, moved the fuel line between the three tank fills, then helped us off. Really, given what I slapped my credit card down for, a tip is reasonable.

WOW! This deserves its own thread IMO! How long or how far will that $2300 take you?

Mako 06-24-2018 10:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stanfromhell (Post 675518)
Whats the difference between a Canadian and a canoe?
Canoes tip.:)
Tipping is an American custom that fortunately the rest of the world does not embrace.

And at times when running around Europe you will insult people if you tip them.

Simi 60 06-24-2018 11:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gordon J (Post 675753)
Much, if not most of the world does NOT tip. In most places, people are paid a salary for their services and do not depend on hand outs from strangers.

Quoted for truth.:thumb:

menzies 06-25-2018 05:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by South of Heaven (Post 675757)
WOW! This deserves its own thread IMO! How long or how far will that $2300 take you?

Depends on a number of things, for example generator use (heat index of 113f here yesterday!).

That paid for 700 gallons on top of the 150 that was there. That is a similar amount to what I had on board for the two months on the Bahamas earlier this year. That got us down there, around there and back with the 150 left. That was using the Genny whenever we needed to, not as much as this time since there was wind a lot of the time.

Going cruise speed outside most of the way to the Chesapeake (approx 700 miles) two months slow cruising there, planning minimal time in marinas, I will probably need to add some before heading back or on the way back.

FF 06-25-2018 05:39 AM

"If you ever go to Italy and berth in a marina do not let the marinaro's touch your lines at all no matter how much they insist because the moment they do they demand a tip for 'assistance'.
Politely say no thank you, as long as they insist keep offering a polite no thank you.Eventually they will give up."

The most common way to travel in Italy and not be bothered endlessly is to fly the German flag.

The dock rats see it and don't bother to move.

OldDan1943 06-25-2018 06:04 AM

I must be a cheap bastard. At my home dock, every 3 months, I tip the 4 'dock boys' and the office secretary $100 bucks each, plus when I leave the boat for 2 months each year, I give them my canned goods and the good stuff from the fridge.
All tips are shared. It is my habit to give the money to one of the dock boys for distribution. One guy thought he deserved more than the others. When this was discovered, he was fired, on the spot.

smitty477 06-25-2018 06:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Simi 60 (Post 675713)
Hotel staff no, but then I can't justify staying in Australian hotels, its cheaper for us to fly to south east Asia and rent a pool villa and even then in the vast majority of cases, tips have been refused. I have been chased out of restaurants, hotels and bars when leaving small money behind and that small money has been returned.

Different story now in tourist areas, Americans giving tips has now made it almost expected to tip, I suspect staff may have had wages cut in these areas.

Taxis? Don't catch them in australia,always use uber and no actual transaction takes place.


Restaurants? I can cook a far better meal onboard in most instances but if I do eat out and pay by card there is no facility here for tipping.
If paying cash I'll round up, but more as I don't want a pocket full of coin.


Most of my life in trade and service industry, never received or expected a tip.
Like I said, first world countries pay a proper wage.


Uber accepts tips with their app , here is the link to how it is doneÖ.
https://www.ridester.com/uber-tipping/

Drake 06-25-2018 06:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pgitug (Post 675485)
We give a $5 tip when the dock help comes out with a good attitude and is pleasant. Which is 99% of the time.

Ditto me.

ranger42c 06-25-2018 06:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Simi 60 (Post 675704)
First world countries pay sufficient wages so tipping is not necessary.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Simi 60 (Post 675713)
Like I said, first world countries pay a proper wage.

Quote:

Originally Posted by AusCan (Post 675733)
I'm not sure about taxi drivers but restaurant staff, hotel porters and chambermaids are paid $18-$24/hour in Australia. Tips are not necessary.


I think restaurant wait staff here are paid something like $2.75/hour. Might have just risen closer to $3/hour...

That's not a typo.

I dunno what our dock hands are paid, but many, maybe most, are summer hire.

-Chris

friz 06-25-2018 08:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Woodland Hills (Post 675519)
The American custom is to not pay employees a living wage forcing customers to make up the difference.

But then again I do not believe "dock hand " at a marina is a career through which one expects to buy a home and send children to college. My experience has been is that tipping is for the service personnel, not management. The OP did specifically ask about a "Dockmaster" whom I would consider management. We once tried to tip a dock hand who had "Dockmaster" prominently displayed on his chest. He politely refused. Faux pas.

smitty477 06-25-2018 08:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by friz (Post 675821)
But then again I do not believe "dock hand " at a marina is a career through which one expects to buy a home and send children to college. My experience has been is that tipping is for the service personnel, not management. The OP did specifically ask about a "Dockmaster" whom I would consider management. We once tried to tip a dock hand who had "Dockmaster" prominently displayed on his chest. He politely refused. Faux pas.

Perhaps not in your area but around here Dockmaster is just a title for someone attending the dock. At many of our local public docks there is only one person attending the dock at a time and as each one comes on schedule they wear a shirt saying "dockmaster".
Not management but just college kids working summer shifts.

Woodland Hills 06-25-2018 08:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by friz (Post 675821)
But then again I do not believe "dock hand " at a marina is a career through which one expects to buy a home and send children to college. My experience has been is that tipping is for the service personnel, not management. The OP did specifically ask about a "Dockmaster" whom I would consider management. We once tried to tip a dock hand who had "Dockmaster" prominently displayed on his chest. He politely refused. Faux pas.

Why shouldn’t a marina dock worker be able to send her kids to state college or buy a small home if they work there for decades? In other countries service workers can expect health care, paid vacations, a living wage, etc why not in America? I can never figure out why we Americans feel that some workers are just not worthy of earning a good life..... Society would come to a halt without these citizens, yet we force them to constantly struggle to get the bare minimum: I just don’t get it.

alormaria 06-25-2018 09:12 AM

I tip everybody. Hell, I'll send you a few bucks for starting this thread.

Mkeller 06-25-2018 09:12 AM

So how many of you tip your doctors, lawyers, veterinarians or accountants?


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