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-   -   question: tipping the dock master (https://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s3/question-tipping-dock-master-39195.html)

dhays 06-25-2018 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mkeller (Post 675841)
So how many of you tip your doctors, lawyers, veterinarians or accountants?



I have one patient that brings me smoked salmon. Does that count?

BandB 06-25-2018 11:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dhays (Post 675891)
I have one patient that brings me smoked salmon. Does that count?

Depends on whether or not you like smoked salmon.

Woodland Hills 06-25-2018 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by foggysail (Post 675879)
Some jobs are not intended for career services. There are many minimum wage jobs that are not marine related such as fast food restaurants, store clerks for starters. Do those who tip dock people extend these same gifts to other low paid employees?

I don’t and I don’t tip dock help nor those who hand a gas nozzle to me so I can pump fuel. Personally I believe tipping can get out of control. Just my thoughts and we all have our own.

EDIT: Our small business often uses plumbers that charge $75/hour. They don’t get tips either.

Some jobs may not be intended as careers, but lots of people stay in them for decades: fast food workers for example. Hotel maids and cleaners are another example of adults trying to raise families in non- career jobs, ditto with many retail positions.

Not everyone can be the boss, but is she the only one who should be able to earn a decent life?

BTW, I never tip business owners, even if they are the workers: I assume you are charging me what you think your services are worth and that’s what I pay.

dhays 06-25-2018 11:40 AM

DDW, while some have mentioned that they get better service by being a good tipper, that is not why I tip and I donít think it is the primary reason tippers do tip. I tip to express appreciation for what someone does. If I appreciate the quality of the service, their attitude, their ability to go out of their way to meet my needs, I will tip.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DDW (Post 675885)
On the US east coast, it was very rare for any dock personnel to assist, so no tips were contemplated. On the US west coast I've *never* had dock personnel assist in 40 years. In Canada, on both coasts, this is far more common - and yet I have never seen a tip changing hands in Canada.


Rarely do I encounter dock hands. One significant exception was in Westview 2 summers ago. Westview is located on the BC Sunshine Coast and is a great stop over for folks heading to Desolation Sound. It is a medium sized marina that gets very busy in the summer. They have seasonal dock hands that help try to accommodate all the visitors like me. I called by radio and told where to go. As I was coming into the tight marina I saw a young running down the dock to meet me and help squeeze me into my spot and get me situated. The kid was good at his job, polite, friendly, happily answered my questions, and then took off running to help the next boat. He got tipped.

foggysail 06-25-2018 11:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Woodland Hills (Post 675900)
Some jobs may not be intended as careers, but lots of people stay in them for decades: fast food workers for example. Hotel maids and cleaners are another example of adults trying to raise families in non- career jobs, ditto with many retail positions.

Not everyone can be the boss, but is she the only one who should be able to earn a decent life?

BTW, I never tip business owners, even if they are the workers: I assume you are charging me what you think your services are worth and that’s what I pay.

Yes... and as those jobs demand higher salaries, they get replaced with automation. Consider McDonalds with their customer accessed computer menu to eliminate a counter employee’s job!

Non-career jobs are getting fewer. With the onset of uncontrolled immigration, competition for those jobs certainly will increase. I have no idea where low skilled people will find work 5 years from now. Terrible situation our Country faces.

DDW 06-25-2018 11:53 AM

I generally do tip when it is normal practice. To get along go along. I gladly tip if the service is truly exceptional, this is out of gratitude as you say. I reluctantly tip when the service is lackluster but tips are nonetheless expected. I tipped in Montreal where all the dock personnel were both helpful and damned good looking. Is that sexist? yeah, probably.

It still seems like a bizarre practice to me.

ranger42c 06-25-2018 02:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by foggysail (Post 675906)
With the onset of uncontrolled immigration, competition for those jobs certainly will increase. I have no idea where low skilled people will find work 5 years from now. Terrible situation our Country faces.


The local crab canning industry down here is in a jam, because they don't have enough employees to do the picking. "Local" labor either isn't interested or the supply is exhausted... and some recent changes to temporary work visas (controlled immigration?) means not enough foreign workers either. Last I heard, processed crab prices have been rising, expected to see the moon shortly...

-Chris

foggysail 06-25-2018 02:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ranger42c (Post 675961)
The local crab canning industry down here is in a jam, because they don't have enough employees to do the picking. "Local" labor either isn't interested or the supply is exhausted... and some recent changes to temporary work visas (controlled immigration?) means not enough foreign workers either. Last I heard, processed crab prices have been rising, expected to see the moon shortly...

-Chris

Sure, the crab industry made national news with reference to the difficulty getting help. And as you noted in your post, “controlled immigration” is fine and expected. Included in the controlled category are those tens of thousands who legally applied for immigration still waiting for their fortunate call. Time will tell if an unskilled labor shortage extends beyond temporary employment.

hjorgan 06-25-2018 07:49 PM

I always tip the dock help. Especially at my home fuel dock. They know me there, and I get great service. The lack of hassle makes up for the small expense.

hmason 06-25-2018 08:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by menzies (Post 675845)
Our local Mohel gets to keep the tips.

:D :eek: now that is funny.

BruceK 06-25-2018 09:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by menzies (Post 675845)
Our local Mohel gets to keep the tips.

Now that`s clever, especially for a Scot.
Limiting it to dockmaster,I`d say a Christmas gift ought to cover it.
More generally,the downunder wage structure is so different, staff are not forced to make their living wage out of tips, their employer has to pay it. In USA it`s a cost shifting exercise, so entrenched it`s there forever.
I`ve heard that our volunteer "Coastguard". Marine Rescue(aka "Dad`s Army), get upset if there are no tips. They are a volunteer organization with no fees, they get some funding from our licensing fees, but if I ever need them(so far I haven`t),I think I`ll tip willingly.

FF 06-26-2018 05:40 AM

"More generally,the downunder wage structure is so different, staff are not forced to make their living wage out of tips, their employer has to pay it."

In the USA folks are paid what there worth , in terms of skill sets.

A dock boy requires , and usually presents nothing , so is paid at a minimum wage .

A tip for breathing is hardly rational , and will not motivate an individual to learn more , to do more , to make more.

A tip for knowledgable help docking in a difficult situation was earned , not a handout, even though helping is the purpose of his employment.

NightCrawler 06-26-2018 07:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shrew (Post 675524)
I tip anyone who helps me with anything. The title might be 'Dockmaster', but if he/she is down on the dock tossing/grabbing lines, their role is now "Dockhand". Some places are so small it is one person who wears many hats. It is their right to refuse tip.

You have the right to NOT tip as well. You can tell the difference. Two boats come into a gas dock at the same time. Everyone runs to one boat until someone is told to go help the other boat. Guess who tips and who doesn't.

I tip the pumpout boat heavily. I rarely wait. I've watched them pass other boats hailing them to take care of us first. I talk to other people who don't have the same experience. I wonder why.

What he said.:thumb: When we return to marinas, we are treated exceptionally well, having taken care of the help on a previous visit. They remember.

smitty477 06-26-2018 07:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FF (Post 676140)
"More generally,the downunder wage structure is so different, staff are not forced to make their living wage out of tips, their employer has to pay it."

In the USA folks are paid what there worth , in terms of skill sets.

A dock boy requires , and usually presents nothing , so is paid at a minimum wage .

A tip for breathing is hardly rational , and will not motivate an individual to learn more , to do more , to make more.

A tip for knowledgable help docking in a difficult situation was earned , not a handout, even though helping is the purpose of his employment.

Agreed - here is an article I just ran across....
https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/fo...5875c22aa55be1

denverd0n 06-27-2018 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shrew (Post 675524)
Two boats come into a gas dock at the same time. Everyone runs to one boat until someone is told to go help the other boat. Guess who tips and who doesn't.

This ^^^^^


Most ESPECIALLY with places that you return to, a couple dollars worth of tips now and then can assure you FAR better service than the guy who never tips. It is, of course, the other guys right not to tip if he does not want to. It is also his right to sit and wait while the service people take care of the customer who takes care of them.


You can say that it shouldn't be that way, but the world works the way the world works. You might just as well complain that the Sun should not rise in the East.

smitty477 06-27-2018 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NightCrawler (Post 676162)
What he said.:thumb: When we return to marinas, we are treated exceptionally well, having taken care of the help on a previous visit. They remember.

Yes - they remember. They remember the nice or generous boaters as well as the pains. They also share information from marina to marina so your boat name ends up having a legacy if you happen to impress the dock hands one way or another.
It is not always luck which slip you end up in or what service, advice, direction or help that you get.
So while tipping is optional please try not to be 'one of those boaters' that come in with a huge attitude belittling the help.

Benthic2 06-27-2018 09:11 AM

The following people can be paid less than minimum wage:

Seasonal and recreational. The article I read mentioned Ski Lodges and amusement parks, but I assume a marina would fall under that as well.

Employees under 20 years old can be paid less than minimum wage for their first 90 days of employment.

Tipped employees. If employees recieve tips, they can be paid less than minimum, however the wages and tips must add up to minimum wage, or the employer has to make up the difference

. The interesting thing here is what constitutes a "tipped employee" Just by the discussion here, its not necessarily clear for some occupations. Obviously bartender, luggage porter and cabbie are tipped, but its not so clear for a few others.

sources:
https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclope...age-32961.html
https://www.cheatsheet.com/money-car...tml/?a=viewall

stanfromhell 06-27-2018 09:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by denverd0n (Post 676510)
This ^^^^^


Most ESPECIALLY with places that you return to, a couple dollars worth of tips now and then can assure you FAR better service than the guy who never tips. It is, of course, the other guys right not to tip if he does not want to. It is also his right to sit and wait while the service people take care of the customer who takes care of them.


You can say that it shouldn't be that way, but the world works the way the world works. You might just as well complain that the Sun should not rise in the East.

Please leave your tipping habits at home when you visit Canada. We like it the way it is now, where everyone is treated equal unless they are jerks and money doesnt buy your way to the head of the line.

hjorgan 06-27-2018 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stanfromhell (Post 676539)
Please leave your tipping habits at home when you visit Canada. We like it the way it is now, where everyone is treated equal unless they are jerks and money doesnt buy your way to the head of the line.

So ya'll are polite .... but cheap. Got it.

BandB 06-27-2018 11:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stanfromhell (Post 676539)
Please leave your tipping habits at home when you visit Canada. We like it the way it is now, where everyone is treated equal unless they are jerks and money doesnt buy your way to the head of the line.

I've tipped in Canada and not a single time had an angry employee upset with me. I will continue to do so. Not buying anything but thanking them for outstanding service.


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